Telegraph.co.uk's top 10 most annoying Americanisms - we can do better.

zaybxcwd12

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Cell phones are called such because the phone moves from cell to cell, ie an area in the range of a certain antennatower.
Ok then forget phones, what about radio transmitters that use a similar system to the mobile (cell) system. are they cell radios?
 

toma_alimosh

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^Batteries have nothing to do with it.
The "cell" in cell-phones is the range that a certain wireless antenna intended for two-way communication can cover. And when moving around with your mobile phone, it connects to different antennas every time. Also, when you move while talking on your mobile phone, your phone will, depending on which route you take, disconnect from one antenna servicing one cell and connect to the antenna servicing the cell you are entering seamlessly. Thus, because cells overlap, you travel from cell to cell without your signal being interrupted (most of the time).

Therefore, it is called a cell-phone because cells are used as determinants as to where your phone connects to the network and also your signal is portable from cell to cell.

Now, wireless home phones don't have this functionality. Once you're outside the range of your one and only transmitter/receiver antenna, the signal is cut off ... there's no other antenna to take over, thus there's only one access point servicing the phone, as opposed to a system of multiple cells. Now, of course there are phone systems made for the phone/office which can do the same thing as a cellphone within the same building, but those are expensive and you won't find them at your local shops, you have to order them especially and have your house rewired and stuff.

Ok then forget phones, what about radio transmitters that use a similar system to the mobile (cell) system. are they cell radios?
What exactly are you referring to?
 

chaos386

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Or in other words, a phone designed to work with a cellular radio network, i.e. "cellular phone" or "cell phone".

I'd say it's actually "mobile phone" that doesn't make sense. If I put some wheels on my landline phone, does that make it a mobile phone? It can move now, after all! :p
 

Dogbert

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So, uh, what's up with calling a trunk a "boot"? I can understand "bonnet" sort of... but "boot"?
 

teeb

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So, uh, what's up with calling a trunk a "boot"? I can understand "bonnet" sort of... but "boot"?
Where's the logic in 'trunk' at all? Cars have very little to do with elephants...

"In earlier usage, a boot was a built-in compartment on a horse-drawn coach, used originally as a seat for the coachman and later for storage."

Boot isn't that logical at all really, but I can't find any better explanation online. Also "Car trunk sale" doesn't sound right...
 

IceBone

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trunk 1462, "box, case," from O.Fr. tronc "alms box in a church" (12c.), also "trunk of a tree, trunk of the human body," from L. truncus, originally "mutilated, cut off." The meaning "box, case" is likely to be from the notion of the body as the "case" of the organs. Eng. acquired the other two senses of the O.Fr. word later; sense of "main stem of a tree" dates from 1490; that of "torso of a human body" from 1494. The sense of "luggage compartment of a motor vehicle" is from 1930. The use in reference to an elephant's snout is from 1565, probably from confusion with trump (short for trumpet). Railroad trunk line is attested from 1843; telephone version is from 1889.
 

hansvonaxion

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Speaking of the whole toilet/bathroom fiasco...

When I first came to Japan I stayed in a youth hostel, I was in the cafeteria and needed to use the loo so I checked my dictionary for the Japanese. Now, being a polite person and in a polite culture I looked up the word for "bathroom" and used that.

"Excuse me, where's the bathroom?"

confused look... "Aahhh, down there (points to a building across the court-yard), but it doesn't open until 5pm"

After I realised what had happened I was too embarrassed to ask again so I peed in my glass under the table and left.
 

Redliner

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Is it my impresion or Japan has *everything*-flavored water?
 

Blind_Io

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Where's the logic in 'trunk' at all? Cars have very little to do with elephants...

"In earlier usage, a boot was a built-in compartment on a horse-drawn coach, used originally as a seat for the coachman and later for storage."

Boot isn't that logical at all really, but I can't find any better explanation online. Also "Car trunk sale" doesn't sound right...


Because that thing on the back is a trunk.

 

smib

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It was mentioned earlier but I want to bring up "I could care less" again. It annoys the shit out of me when people say this to convey the fact lie that they don't care at all about the subject matter.
 
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