The end of an era: say goodbye to the Porsche naturally aspirated engine

marcos_eirik

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A 1500cc Porsche engine:



On the other hand, you'll still be able to get an NA-911:
[video=youtube;-hTLk1rU_ZI]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-hTLk1rU_ZI[/video]
 
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Redliner

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A 1.6 in a Porsche... I'm sorry, that's just sounds so wrong.

With this strategy the Cayman GT4 will actually grow in value as it will become older.
The Cayman GT4 would appreciate in value anyway, because 3-pedals.
 

marcos_eirik

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But for how long? (I apologize if it was spelled out in the video...I missed it, if so). It wasn't that long ago that it was presumed they would always be available with 3 pedals.
For the foreseeable future is the answer to that, head of Porsche's GT-cars development Andreas Preuninger has repeated this in several interviews.

When it comes to the manual gearbox, the reason for not having one in the GT3 was that they could only do PDK or manual, making both didn't make economic sense with such a (relatively) small production run (GT3 accounts for less than 1/10th of the total 911 production) because that would almost double development costs. PDK was chosen for it's performance benefits, and to broaden the GT3's appeal and make it's performance more accessible to the average customer. With the introduction of the Cayman GT4, the manual was back (no PDK option), and the reason behind that was the emphasis on driver involvement, and the production run was too small to do both here as well.

For the future, Preuninger has stated in some interviews that the manual may make a comeback in the GT3 if customer demand is strong enough, the speed of which the GT4s were sold out may have convinced them. So there is a chance that the manual may appear in the face-lifted 991 GT3, as an expensive option, to cover the additional costs.

But then again, you can still get a new 911 with three pedals you know ;)
 

marcos_eirik

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This is the facelifted 991:





[...]After hearing it how it sounds, N?rburgring Bridge To Gantry believes the car likely had a turbocharged engine which shouldn't come as a surprise as the facelifted 911 range is expected to go all-turbo except for the GT3 models.

The Carrera version will reportedly make use of a six-cylinder 2.7-liter engine outputting 407 PS (300 kW) whereas the Carrera S is believed to receive a larger 3.4-liter turbo-six, but it's output is not known at this moment.

As for the styling changes, there are revised graphics for the lighting units, new DRLs, slightly different bumpers, new exhaust system with the tips closer to each other, along with vertical slats for the engine cover. On the inside, previous spy shots have shown the 991.2 model will bring the 918 Spyder's steering wheel, a bigger display for the infotainment system and a toggle switch mounted on the right-hand side.

Since Porsche doesn't even bother camouflaging the prototypes anymore, an official online reveal should come very soon. A public debut is set for mid-September at the Frankfurt Motor Show and sales will likely begin shortly thereafter.
Typical Porsche facelift: only small changes to the exterior, however the engines are all new (like the 997 mid life update with the DFI engines)
 

marcos_eirik

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Here it is: (Porsche Microsite here)












And so the next chapter of Porsche 911-kind begins. Stuttgart has confirmed the worst-kept secret in motoring: the second-generation 991 will sprout a pair of turbochargers on lowly Carreras, boosting power and torque significantly and lowering emissions and fuel consumption.

This is downsizing in action. The new 2016 model year 991.2 will shrink the flat six to 3.0 litres in capacity, but swell outputs through forced induction. Key figures are:
- Porsche 911 Carrera 365bhp, 332lb ft from 1700-5000rpm
- Porsche 911 Carrera S 414bhp, 369lb ft from 1700-5000rpm

In both instances, that?s 20 horses more than their predecessors. Both models share the same capacity; the Carrera S?s extra power comes from modified turbos, a separate exhaust and tuned engine management.
 
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marcos_eirik

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Now this is what the base Carrera (without sports exhaust) sounds like inside:

 

marcos_eirik

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Worried about Porsche going turbo with the 911 Carrera? - Don't be. It's fine. ;)

2016 Porsche 911 Carrera S review: why turbocharging hasn't ruined the Carrera

[...]

So, the car we have is a standard Carrera S without any PDCC or rear-wheel steering and? it feels pretty bloody fantastic. There is real feel though the steering, the wheel bubbling with background chatter even on the motorway without any lock applied. Up on the island?s equivalent of a B-road the steering weights up beautifully in your hands as you load up the suspension in corners and it really encourages you to push the car. This is a massive change from how the electric steering behaved in the first generation 991 when it was launched.

The chassis reacts as a 911 should ? in other words it feels like a rear-engined car, flowing through corners, shifting subtly from turn-in to exit and making the most of the weight balance. The extra torque of the engine really helps to push it through the final phase of a corner too, working the formidable traction to its limit, getting the car to squat and drive beautifully out of bends. As for the new 3.0-litre flat-six, you can certainly tell that the engine is turbocharged in its delivery, but the throttle response is very good and even with a standard exhaust the sound is much closer to an old naturally aspirated Carrera than it is to the gas rush of a Turbo.

The engine continued to impress during our full day on Tenerife. It certainly sounds softer low down, but it is still a pleasing, distinctively flat-six sound. The most gratifying thing however is the way the 3.0-litre engine revs. In a 911 Turbo (the full-fat four-wheel drive monster) you get a lot of gas rush and the limiter not only seems to arrive quite early, but it is also quite hard to distinguish aurally where it is. With the 991.2, the engine has a real crescendo to it, revving sweetly all the way to the far side of 7500rpm and never letting up in its power delivery. In short, while you can surf along on the low-down torque you are also rewarded for chasing the red line.

The overall grip of the car is staggering. It?s also quite deceptive. As I said in my initial impressions, at sane speeds the car feels very much like a 911 should and with the dampers in their normal (softer) setting there is a delightful amount of weight transition and body roll. This leads you to expect that the car might slide quite easily, but certainly on the dry, super grippy tarmac of the roads around the volcano, the 991.2 would just cling on and cling on. Getting hard on the throttle early in the corner the car would feel like it was about to relinquish grip before digging deep with its rear tyres, finding extra reserves and just firing you out of the bend. It was both deeply impressive and a touch disappointing at the same time. I found the car would indulge in small but enjoyable slides that almost didn?t require any corrective lock but it will be interesting to get it onto a track (with a bit more space and less traffic!) and see how it behaves when the limit is conclusively breached.

[...]

More reviews: Autocar 1 (Carrera S), Autocar 2 (Carrera), CAR, and PistonHeads.
 
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