The European Refugee Situation

Delll

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That's fair enough.
That's not at all the case - I'm not Donald Trump (or Delll). The fact that SOME refugees are criminals does not mean that they ALL are but it certainly reinforces the idea that they ALL should've been very thoroughly screened before being allowed in. You can be humane without shooting yourself in the foot.
Good point, but as far as I understood right, those asylum seeker volunteers were never alone with the children. So, I don't really see the problem with not being able to check their criminal records. As long as the volunteers are not regularly alone with the children, I don't think allowing them to work would be against the law.

I work with minors myself, and have had to prove to my employer that I have no criminal record, as the law states I have to do. But the difference is that I work alone with the children and get paid for it, whereas those volunteers were always there with another person and are not in employement contract with playschool.
The law says that they don't even have to be alone with kids:
Vapaaehtoisteht?v?n j?rjest?j?ll? on oikeus pyyt?? Oikeusrekisterikeskukselta rikosrekisterilain (770/1993) 6 ?:n 2 momentissa tarkoitettu rikosrekisteriote vapaaehtoisesta, jos vapaaehtoisteht?v?n j?rjest?j? on antamassa vapaaehtoiselle teht?v?n, johon kuuluu:
1) s??nn?llisesti ja olennaisesti alaik?isen opetusta, ohjausta, hoitoa, huolenpitoa tai muuta yhdess?oloa alaik?isen kanssa;
2) henkil?kohtainen vuorovaikutus alaik?isen kanssa; ja
3) teht?v?n hoitaminen yksin tai sellaisissa olosuhteissa, joissa alaik?isen henkil?kohtaista koskemattomuutta ei t?m?n lain 4 ?:ss? tarkoitetuista toimista huolimatta voida kohtuudella turvata.
Besides, a couple of "17-year-old" bodybuilder asylum seekers could easily overpower the 15-25 and 50+ women that typically work in kindergartens. And on that note, 90 out of 149 asylum seekers claiming to be underage and subjected to age tests (based on dental and hand/wrist bone development (I'm not an expert)) in 2015 were found to be over 18. Edge cases were decided in the seeker's favour.
 

nomix

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You're so paraonid you could be a song by Black Sabbath.
 

topgearwascool

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I wished I'd have known I was going to pass that refugee camp at Calais last September, but it's on the very last turn in Europe so it's like 7 hours and they don't tell you about it and then you're there, going through immigration.
Shame... Had I have known (I went in the dead of night going, arrived, saw the lights on the boat, the light house)... - So I just didn't see it going, coming back in the day, it looked livelier than Belgium; like Vauxhall Market on a Sunday but more bonfires.
Would have been a nice snapshot.
 

LeVeL

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I wished I'd have known I was going to pass that refugee camp at Calais last September, but it's on the very last turn in Europe so it's like 7 hours and they don't tell you about it and then you're there, going through immigration.
Shame... Had I have known (I went in the dead of night going, arrived, saw the lights on the boat, the light house)... - So I just didn't see it going, coming back in the day, it looked livelier than Belgium; like Vauxhall Market on a Sunday but more bonfires.
Would have been a nice snapshot.
What are they, zoo animals?
 

skeleton

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Recap of last year in my country.
We received little over 100 refugees from the relocation program. Government tells us we take families with children and every person is thoroughly investigated before accepting. So the best of the best. Simple math says thats ~30 families.
Within a few months of arrival 2 of the husbands have tried to burn their wife alive. Luckily they failed although last victim is over 40% burnt. I guess 93% success rate of not trying to burn the mother of your children to death is pretty good?

So all of this has taken a few million euros. Not a lot for Germany or such but quite a lot around here. Would have solved some local insignificant problems like people freezing to death in winter or children going to bed hungry.
Wasting 3k euro per person per month while quarter of locals get under 500? is nice too.

Can a politically correct person explain how this makes sense cause i really want to believe something good can come of this..
 

DanRoM

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Please define your country so that we have a chance of knowing what you're talking about.
 

LeVeL

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Looks like ISIS has been kicked out of Syria and generally reduced to virtually nothing, as they have no major strongholds anymore. Will the refugees be going back now or are they staying put across Europe?
 

Interrobang

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LeVeL;n3542479 said:
Looks like ISIS has been kicked out of Syria and generally reduced to virtually nothing, as they have no major strongholds anymore. Will the refugees be going back now or are they staying put across Europe?
They have very little say in the matter, they have to follow the laws of the countries that are hosting them. If Syria is being declared "safe" (not so far), they will be able to return home if they are not at risk of being harmed by the Assad Regime. Which is still in power and lots of people fled from Assad and his murderers. So the people fleeing Isis may be able to return - the ones fleeing from Assad's Bombs and politcal Prisions on the other hand will likley still have to stay untill they are no longer at risk and they can return to their home safely.
 

LeVeL

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Berlin sets up New Year’s Eve ‘safe zone’ for women amid sexual assault concerns

As thousands celebrate New Year's Eve at Berlin's iconic Brandenburg Gate on Sunday night, a team of medical professionals in a white tent only yards away will be standing by, waiting for possible victims of sexual assault and harassment to seek their help.

After mass sexual assaults occurred on New Year's Eve in several German cities two years ago, Berlin officials now work on the assumption that prevention efforts alone may no longer be sufficient at such large-scale events. Women will be able to speak to psychologists immediately after being assaulted or harassed in a “safe zone” at the Berlin New Year's Eve event.

While the presence of medical professionals and police officers at crowded event sites is nothing new, it is the first time such a dedicated area with experienced staffers will be set up in Berlin, and the first time that such an effort is being undertaken on New Year's Eve in Germany.

"[Assaulted women] can stay here and calm down or speak to someone trained to offer psychological support,” said Anja Marx, the spokeswoman of Berlin's main New Year's Eve celebrations. Up to five members of a German Red Cross team will be available to offer immediate support to victims.

On New Year's Eve 2015, about 1,200 women became victims of sexual assault in several major German cities, with more than 600 women attacked in Cologne and about 400 victims in the northern German city of Hamburg. Prosecutors established that more than 2,000 men were involved in the assaults, but only a tiny fraction — about half of them foreign nationals who at the time had only recently arrived in the country — had been identified a year later.

It took months for the full scale of the 2015 assaults to emerge, but when prosecutors released their final estimates, Germans' attitude toward refugees changed dramatically: To many, New Year's Eve 2015 is the night Germany's welcoming attitude toward newcomers ended. Leading politicians called for tougher deportation laws soon thereafter.

Far fewer cases of sexual assault were registered last year after authorities sent out thousands of additional police officers onto the streets and banned the use of fireworks in several locations. Privately purchased fireworks can create intense smoke, potentially hindering police operations to prevent or stop sexual assaults and other crimes.

Germany's parliament also passed stricter sexual assault laws last year that addressed complaints that German codes had been too lax. Previously, prosecutors had to prove that alleged perpetrators used force or made threats. Most of the alleged perpetrators responsible for the 2015 New Year's Eve assaults stood accused of offenses such as facilitating sex assaults as part of a group or groping, accusations that were difficult to prosecute under the old laws.

This year, authorities have doubled down on efforts to not only prosecute but also prevent assaults. Apart from an increased police presence, authorities have installed more CCTV cameras and streetlights across major cities.

Far fewer sexual assaults occurred in Berlin during the 2015 celebrations than in other cities, partially due to the experience Berlin authorities have in dealing with crowds. Still, authorities there have taken more preventative measures since, this year adding the safe zone. A similar effort was made at the rowdy Oktoberfest celebration in the German capital.

However, Berlin's safe zone has come under some criticism. The chairman of Germany's police union, Rainer Wendt, criticized Berlin's planned safe zone for women in an interview with a German newspaper this week, saying: “Whoever came up with this idea did not understand its political dimension. It implies that there are zones of security as well as zones of insecurity.”

Wendt's criticism was shared by others who believe that the introduction of women's safe zones would essentially come close to accepting sexual violence as a reality of life, and that it could lead to the “end of equality, freedom and self-determination,” in Germany, as Wendt phrased it.

But experts on sexual assault prevention disagree with that assessment. “Germany’s efforts are a step in the right direction — they counter the expectation that sexual violence should be treated as a private problem, not a public concern,” said Rachel Davis, managing director at the Prevention Institute in Oakland, Calif., even though she emphasized that “more can be done to prevent it in the first place.”

“It’s also important to counter the promotion of other norms, such as rigid gender norms that associate masculinity with control and femininity with compliance, acceptance of abuse of power over others, and acceptance of aggression and violence,” said Davis.
 

LeVeL

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[h=1]German study links increased crime rate to migrant arrivals[/h] The German state of Lower Saxony witnessed a 10.4 percent increase in crime at the height of the migration crisis, according to a study. The study’s authors said age and reporting practices factored into the connection.

A new study suggested a link between an increase in reported violent crimes in Lower Saxony and a significant increase in migrant arrivals in the state.

According to the study, which was conducted by the Zurich University of Applied Sciences and paid for by Germany's Ministry of Family Affairs, police witnessed an increase of 10.4 percent in reported violent crimes in 2015 and 2016. More than 90 percent of the increase (not of total violent crimes) was said to be attributable to migrants.

The study's authors claimed that part of the increase was due to the fact that violent crimes committed by migrants were twice as likely to be reported compared to those committed by German nationals.

Contributing factors

Another factor contributing to the authors' correlation was the age of the migrants. According to the study, men between the ages of 14 and 30 are more likely to commit violent crimes than those in other age brackets.

The study said the 14 to 30 age bracket formed the largest of its kind for migrants in Lower Saxony, suggesting that in turn contributed to the link between the rising rate of violent crime and the increase in migrant arrivals in the state.

The authors also noted that there was a significant difference in the criminal migrants' country of origin, saying men from Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan were significantly less likely to commit a violent crime than those hailing from North Africa.

The findings reflect earlier reporting that violent crime had increased notably during the so-called migration crisis. However, other studies found no links between increased crime rates and migrants.

Increased migrant arrivals

Roughly 1 million migrants in total entered Germany in a relatively short period of time in the second half of 2015, many of them fleeing war and extreme poverty in the Middle East, Asia and Africa. This followed Angela Merkel's snap decision to ignore European protocols on a temporary basis and allow people walking across Europe to apply for asylum in Germany, rather than returning them to the first EU country they set foot in.

The most common reason for the migration was the civil war in Syria that has killed more than 300,000 people and displaced around half of the population.
 
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