The Gun thread

Der Stig

is Der Slut
DONOR
Joined
Dec 19, 2008
Messages
7,116
Location
Misery Knob
Car(s)
Too many and yet not enough
Those are good fakes if they are. They have the third pinned drilled, so with the right parts kit, capable of full auto.

Can you liberate some for us and send them up for further examination? 😆
 

ScarFace88

Forum Addict
Joined
Jul 12, 2012
Messages
6,704
Location
Central Floriderp
Car(s)
'00 CVPI, '88 Integra, '05 GTO
Those are good fakes if they are. They have the third pinned drilled, so with the right parts kit, capable of full auto.

Can you liberate some for us and send them up for further examination? 😆
ATF wants to know your pupper's location.
 

Spectre

The Deported
Joined
Feb 1, 2007
Messages
36,231
Location
Dallas, Texas
Car(s)
00 4Runner | 02 919 | 87 XJ6 | 86 CB700SC | 89 POS
The "IAR" lower does appear to be counterfeit - however, unless I miss my guess, it's likely to be a 'real' lower in the sense that you can put an AR half on it with the other parts required to finish out this lower and have it function as a regular rifle.

The ones in the last picture are definitely not USMC issue IAR lowers, IMHO.
 

Spectre

The Deported
Joined
Feb 1, 2007
Messages
36,231
Location
Dallas, Texas
Car(s)
00 4Runner | 02 919 | 87 XJ6 | 86 CB700SC | 89 POS
Remember this?

Remington will not be leaving NY - the US government just gave them an $80 mil contract over 10 years and apparently one of the conditions is that they stay in NY. We'll see how well that works out for Remington when they start losing civvie sales.
Weeeelllll, looks like that $80M contract didn't quite work out the way Remington thought it would. The government has stopped ordering the Remington M2010 for SOCOM and will be buying Barrett MRADs instead. The MRADs not only will be replacing the Mk13 family but taking over the same "Mk" number as the M2010 had in SOCOM service, implying that it is likely going to be a complete replacement for the SOCOM M2010 derivative as well - and that the government considers the M2010 in SOCOM service a mistake to be deleted.

https://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zone/26940/u-s-special-operators-are-getting-new-sniper-rifles-for-the-second-time-in-six-years

U.S. military special operations forces are set to get new bolt-action Barrett Multi-Role Adaptive Design sniper rifles, or MRADs, which operators can readily reconfigure to fire any of three different calibers depending on the mission requirements. The new weapons will help U.S. Special Operations Command streamline its sniper rifle inventories and expand its capabilities, but comes less than six years after a previous contract for entirely different guns that was supposed to meet many of the same basic goals.
The ASR is primarily slated to replace the remaining variants of the Mk 13 rifle family, which are derivatives of the Remington 700 in .300 Winchester Magnum.
But the purchase of the Barrett rifles raises questions about performance, or lack thereof, of rifles that SOCOM began purchasing in 2013 under an earlier program known as the Precision Sniper Rifle (PSR). That effort began four years earlier and called for a rifle that could accurately engage targets between 330 and 1,640 yards and could swap quickly between 7.62x51mm, .300 Winchester Magnum, and .338 Lapua Magnum.

Remington won this competition with their Modular Sniper Rifle (MSR), a derivative of the 7.62x51mm M2010 sniper rifle the company had developed for the U.S. Army. Among the rifles that lost out was the MRAD, which Barrett had originally developed specifically for the competition.
At the time, SOCOM confusingly announced that Remington’s rifle would also be designated the Mk 21. Though not unheard of, it is extremely rare for two completely distinct rifles to share the same base designation.

The PSR contract was also supposed to include work through 2023, but there has been very little discussion about the introduction and use of these rifles since Remington won the deal. In 2015, SOCOM almost zeroed out the fifth delivery order – cutting more than $4.8 million from the option, which was originally worth less than $5.1 million – without offering a public explanation. There have been no other contract actions relating to the PSR deal since then, according to the Federal Procurement Data System.

In 2018, U.S. Army Lieutenant Colonel Mark Owens, the Program Manager for Ammo and Weapons within SOCOM’s Program Executive Office for Special Operations Forces Warrior, made no mention of the PSR program whatsoever in a briefing he gave at the National Defense Industry Association’s annual Special Operations Forces Industry Conference. The same presentation said that special operations forces would continue to use the existing Mk 13 rifles until they got phased out in favor of the new ASRs.
SOCOM

This slide from US Army Lieutenant Colonel Mark Owens' 2018 briefing makes no mention of the PSR program at all.

So, it remains to be seen whether the new Barrett Mk 21 rifles will supplement or outright replace the Remington Mk 21s. Depending on how many of the latter rifles SOCOM actually accepted delivery of as part the PSR program, it may be easy for the new ASRs to supplant them entirely.
Those that think this might be some machination of the Trump Administration, please note when the government abruptly stopped buying Remington PSRs - 2015. Looks like the military was having problems with the rifles long before Trump was elected. Or Remington's recent bankruptcy.

Since I had to go back and find the original post, I was reminded of this:

You really think it's worthwhile for Remington to pack up and move while also violating an $80 million federal contract?
Welp, at this point, it looks like they should have done a Magpul and begun moving whilst fulfilling the contract. Especially considering that about a year or so after they got the contract, SOCOM prematurely stopped ordering their rifles and in their public briefings since have basically pretended that the PSRs don't exist. Add to that their bankruptcy due in part to staying in NY and losing civilian sales as a result, weeeeeellllll... yeah. That was a huge mistake on their part.
 
Top