Ultrafast-Charging Solid-State EV Batteries Around The Corner, Toyota

jack_christie

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Cellos88GT

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I hope this works out for Toyota. I would like to see them deflate the egos of the Cult of Muskers. That being said, I'm highly skeptical that we'll see solid-state batteries that soon at a cost that makes sense.
 
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JCE

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I hope this works out for Toyota. I would like to see them deflate the egos of the Cult of Muskers. That being said, I'm highly skeptical that we'll see solid-state batteries that soon at a cost that makes sense.
The cost thing is what is the most curious. With this being a new technology once it is officially available to the public I'd imagine the extra cost will be quite high. Even higher than Douchie Musk is charging for his better battery in the model 3. ;)
 

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I've wondered, what exactly happens once these batteries no longer take a usable charge? How safe or environmentally friendly is recycling or disposing of the components? Plus, how are current or even future manufacturing practices all that much better than what we currently have with ICE? Only improvement I can see is the pollution is no longer visible on a day to day basis, it's condensed to the areas where the batteries are manufactured and recycled.
 
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prizrak

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Well for one you are going to improve urban air quality quite a bit, for two believe it or not it is actually easier to clean up one big pipe vs a bunch of small ones. I wouldn't say that this would have some sort of massive positive environmental impact overall but it would improve it in places where most people live (urban and suburban areas)
 

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Ultrafast-Charging Solid-State EV Batteries Around The Corner, Toyota

Right so, we're just moving the pollution away from where people live. Not really changing actual pollution output. We might be but, my limited google searches don't seem to yield any evidence.
 

Spectre

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Right so, we're just moving the pollution away from where people live. Not really changing actual pollution output. We might be but, my limited google searches don't seem to yield any evidence.
It still comes down to the same issue BEVs have now.


It's not really an electric vehicle. It's really a "whatever the local generation authority uses" powered car - be that nuclear, natural gas, solar, wind, coal, burning biomass, souls, or a forsaken child.
 
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GRtak

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I've wondered, what exactly happens once these batteries no longer take a usable charge?

The first thing will be to re-use them for a home or commercial solar or wind power storage battery. That will still have enough of a transfer rate to be useful for at least another decade, if not two.

How safe or environmentally friendly is recycling or disposing of the components? Plus, how are current or even future manufacturing practices all that much better than what we currently have with ICE?
I have no idea on the first part. Disposing of the components is always a bad idea, and recycling does not come free, but it can't be any worse than pulling oil out of the ground, converting it to fuels and oils, burning it through an engine that is started and stopped several times a day.


Only improvement I can see is the pollution is no longer visible on a day to day basis, it's condensed to the areas where the batteries are manufactured and recycled.

We already have that problem around our current energy production systems.



It still comes down to the same issue BEVs have now.


It's not really an electric vehicle. It's really a "whatever the local generation authority uses" powered car - be that nuclear, natural gas, solar, wind, coal, burning biomass, souls, or a forsaken child.

You forgot hydro electric power in there.

I find it hard to believe that even a coal powered plant, that runs for weeks at a time, would produce more emissions than a vehicle that is started and shut down several times a day. Is it the cleanest? No, but we are shifting away from coal anyway. And if the person has solar or wind, they are really not polluting much at all.
 

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You forgot hydro electric power in there.
I didn't forget it, I couldn't be bothered to list all of them. I also left out tidal motion, industrial fuel cells and several other power generation systems.

I find it hard to believe that even a coal powered plant, that runs for weeks at a time, would produce more emissions than a vehicle that is started and shut down several times a day. Is it the cleanest? No, but we are shifting away from coal anyway. And if the person has solar or wind, they are really not polluting much at all.
Burning gasoline does not produce or release significant levels of radioactives. Burning coal does, quite a bit. Pretty sure "some" is more than "none" and that "radioactive" is generally worse than "non-radioactive."

Wind and solar does have additional hidden environmental costs as well as additional issues for the rest of the grid. Wind power has resulted in damage to German nuclear reactors, actually.
 

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I have no idea on the first part. Disposing of the components is always a bad idea, and recycling does not come free, but it can't be any worse than pulling oil out of the ground, converting it to fuels and oils, burning it through an engine that is started and stopped several times a day.
Problem is that we are not going to stop pulling oil out of the ground any time soon, we need it for basically everything that makes modern living possible, including all those electric cars. Some uses here - http://business.mapsofindia.com/india-petroleum-industry/multifaceted-uses-of-petrochemicals.html

Also believe it or not but modern gasoline engines are quite clean because of catalytic converters it's really mostly CO2
 

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That is part of why we are shifting away from coal. Nuclear power was a poor choice for that type of use anyway. It also needs to drastically change to be considered for future use.
 

prizrak

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Not for nothing but I hope this isn't vapor ware. Even if I personally wouldn't choose an EV I would love the tech in all my electronics.
 
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