What's your latest [non-technology] purchase?

prizrak

Forum Addict
Joined
Apr 2, 2007
Messages
20,898
Location
No, sleep, till, BROOKLYN
Car(s)
11 Xterra Pro-4x, 12 'stang GT
A major difference also is that vinyl has an effective sample rate of around 192 kHz, where as the max you can get on a CD is 48. On the other hand, vinyl isn't that good for definition on the edges of the frequency spectrum. If you really want the best possible recording, you'd need a lossless copy of the studio masters (which you can sometimes get), but for that you need playback equipment well beyond any of our budgets and even then it'd be questionable if most of us could hear the difference.

I'm just fine with CD quality (or v0 mp3).
Sample rate is somewhat meaningless if your master is below that rate, there is also the point where your ears "resolution" is too low to detect it.
 

Dr_Grip

Made from concentrate
DONOR
Joined
Jul 8, 2008
Messages
14,015
Location
Germany
Car(s)
1979 Opel Kadett | 1972 Ford Country Sedan
The thing is: Most hifi freaks know nothing about music. Most hifi freaks are completely surprised, when they get out of their stylish homes with state-of-the-art equipment and listen to pure, straight live music. The real sound and the real volume of natural instruments is sometimes really shocking to them. When I was still active in the scene, many have gotten so far away from what music really is, that live music is strange or even irritating to them. Mind you: When I say "live music" I mean acoustical instruments and voices without amplification, I don't refer to a rock concert!
You are right and wrong at the same time, I'd say. For thinks like classical music, jazz and some kinds of blues you are right, as the live performance is the primary medium of this kind of music and any recording "only" is a reproduction of a live performance at a certain time, date and place - even if said performance was staged for the sole purpose of recording it and no audience except for the engineers was present.
That's why every performance is comparable - no matter if it's a school orchestra trying their hand on Beethoven or Daniel Barenboim, no matter which jazz combo is improvising on "Changes", they all share the same direct relation to the original sheet music - some performances are better, some are worse, but all are directly linked to the sheet music.

For pop music, as a broadly put genre (you can use "rock" or "rock and roll" as a descriptor here as well), it is different. Here, the studio recording, produced in one or a series of sessions by musicians and engineers/producers is the primary medium. "Folsom Prison Blues" by Johnny Cash refers to the song as he and his band recorded it under the auspices of Sam Philips at Sun Studio, Memphis, TN on July 30, 1955. And not to any take (or "cut" in early recording parlor) they put down that day, but the single one they selected for release. Any other recording of the same material, even if done by the same people in the same space, is not the pop song Folsom Prison Blues, but a cover, a copy, a fake. The reason for this is that pop music has always been thought with mass reproduction in mind, with the fact that it is possible to make identical copies of the same recording taking center stage. With the advent of recording techniques like Phil Spector's "Wall of Sound" or the excesses possible by multi-track consoles, like "Dark Side of the Moon", Queen's "Bohemian Rhapsoody" or even any 80s Iron Maiden Album (which generally feature four or more guitar tracks), it becomes blatantly obvious that a huge chunk of pop music was never even be conceptualized to be reproduced in a concert - of course, Floyd and Maiden regularily play these songs on tour, but these live performances have to feature stripped-down versions of the original songs (it should come as no surprise that both Maiden and Floyd have a reputation for excessive retouching of their "live" releases in studio).

So, if you primarily listen to pop music, emphasizing on getting your playback equipment right makes a whole lot of sense. Sadly, many "audiophiles" are jazz or classical music buffs. For them, it's a different story...
 
Last edited:

MacGuffin

Forum Addict
DONOR
Joined
Mar 29, 2008
Messages
8,275
Location
Wilhelmshaven, Germany
Car(s)
'17 Ford Mustang GT Fastback
I don't make a difference between certain styles of music. The same technical and physical rules apply to all sorts of electronic music signals, no matter if they contain classical music, heavy metal or the recording of a steam locomotive. If the signal is being processed accurately, there shouldn't be any differences than that in the recording itself. I admit it's difficult to achieve but not completely impossible. And of course there is the budget question...
 

CraigB

Ich bin ein Kartoffel
DONOR
Joined
Feb 14, 2007
Messages
12,743
Location
SWMO
Car(s)
Mustang SVO - Nissan Frontier Pro-4X & Altima
The one I had put American candy bars to shame in the sweetness category.
 

warden

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 21, 2005
Messages
817
Location
Melbourne, Australia
Car(s)
2016 Hilux Diesel Dual Cab, BMW R1200GS Adventure
Bite a corner off either end and use it as a straw to suck your coffee through. Heaven....
 
Top