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Where we are going, we might not need four wheel drive... '94 Fiat Panda 1000 "Cosi"

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  • Where we are going, we might not need four wheel drive... '94 Fiat Panda 1000 "Cosi"



    I haven’t bought a car in ages. With the FinalGear Balkan Roadtrip™ coming up soon, I felt like getting a roadtrip car from Slovenia – just like MXM – would be the natural thing to do, and getting a Panda – just like MXM – was the logical choice. Driving down there in one of my own cars would be more expensive than buying one from afar, and just flying in and passengering would be a bit boring after all the shenanigans in recent years.

    Like MXM said, I originally planned to get a Yugo. But in fact, when the idea of the trip came about, I suggested we group-buy an old Alfa Romeo. Neither of these happened: I found Yugos to be almost as expensive as 4x4 Pandas, and suitable Alfa Romeos were available only on the wrong side of the country, on the coast.

    Unos were a bit boring,, and only one suitable Tipo and Tempra seemed to be available. But amazingly, FWD Pandas offered great value compared to anything else, as they only cost hundreds of Euros instead of over a thousand.

    One particular example was in the clear from the start: a 1994 “Cosi” edition (no idea, either) with the 999cc, 45hp FIRE unit. As I watched better-photographed 4x4s vanishing from the listings, this stayed, mainly because there was just one photo and no price assigned. But as it was said to have valid MOT, it was a contender from the start.







    After MXM got his Panda, it was time for me to get mine. Nicjasno went to see it, verified that it’s in actually pretty decent shape, and did a deal for just 300 euros. And immediately after, the little teal box passed MOT with only a couple easily rectified demerits.









    So, the hard facts: 155,000 km or thereabouts, with the belts done 3000 km ago. Despite its colour, it’s not quite mint – there are a bunch of scrapes and dents and a bit of rust, but it’s all still manageable. Some bubbling is apparent in the door seams as always on unrestored cheap Pandas, and some more rust can be find in the underbody trunk floor seam behind the bumper.





    The interior has fared well, with the original seats just worn but not ripped, and most importantly, it has the dashboard clock! There will be some light nicjasno spec maintenance done before the hard core Balkan to Baltic run, and I’m really happy about the state of things currently! The plan is to drive this beautiful bastard home and see if it's good for registering or as a parts donor for MXM's 4x4. Can't wait to fly down to Slovenia and get behind the wheel.
    Last edited by public; July 3rd, 2018, 5:41 PM.

  • public
    replied


    Successfully inspected in Finland! A necessary step in importation is a registration inspection, where they mostly check your papers and verify everything complies with the system here. Since the car had valid and fresh EU/ETA inspection, it wasn't subjected to a roadworthiness inspection, but the emissions were still checked as well as the, well, general appearance of the car. Now I'm just waiting for the import tax randomizer to spit out a bill and I can apply for plates.

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  • Adunaphel
    replied
    Originally posted by MXM View Post
    "does 160 km/h"... Oh, you journalists
    It can pobably even hit 200, if the plane flies high enough

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  • MXM
    replied
    "does 160 km/h"... Oh, you journalists

    Leave a comment:


  • public
    replied


    So, a month later...

    Let me just post my current feelings and fill in the gaps later. After thousands of kilometres hauling this thing first south, then north, I can confirm I've completely bonded with it. While it's totally a 300 euro car that cost a fair bit more to get here, it's absolutely brilliant and in truth extremely reliable and durable. Repairs/maintenance needed during our 7000 km together: some CRC in some underbonnet relays, couple bulbs, two fuel filler caps, new tires, an alternator and a couple litres of cheap oil. Fuel consumption ranged from just under 5 to 6.8l/100km, or about 35 mpg to 47. The car seats four in undeniable comfort, does 160 km/h, hauls a lot of beer, climbs mountains and does 13-minute ringlaps. It is one of the best ways to condense a car and still have it remain perfectly useable.

    I have already confessed to the Finnish authorities that I have committed the sin of bringing yet another car into this country, so it will be interesting to see what kind of import duty it will be subjected to.

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  • Aston Martin
    replied
    Originally posted by public View Post
    All Parades had the canvas roofs? This doesn’t.

    OK, but the Cosi was available in this colour and purple like the Parade, it has the same interior fabric.
    However I believe yours should have clear front indicators.

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  • public
    replied
    All Parades had the canvas roofs? This doesn’t.

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  • Aston Martin
    replied
    That’s a fucking Parade. I think.

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  • Eye-Q
    replied
    So that's what's meant by "polishing a turd"...

    Leave a comment:


  • public
    replied








    Thoroughly detailed by nicjasno! It looks very tidy now.

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  • Adunaphel
    replied
    It's Something Awful, indeed

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  • samulis
    replied
    Can anyone who's spent time behind the wheel tell, does the seating position follow ISA?

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  • public
    replied
    Confirmed with a Finnish MOT office that the car will not need a CoC document at import, as it's old enough to not need one. The two Pandas have slightly different VIN plates, as MXM's 1999 car has the EU type approval stamped on it, and mine only has the German ABE equivalent. Weirdly, the MOT office where I took my same-year MX-5 at import initially said I should've needed the CoC, and later marked down the EU type approval codes in the Mazda's German documents that luckily had them. But since I have confirmation from another place on this occasion, it should sail through registration with minimal expenses instead of needing costly documents. And since it has fuel injection, a catalytic converter and headlight adjustment along with fresh Slovenian MOT, I can't foresee that many problems.

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  • narf
    replied
    Either that, or speed limit reminders at 30, 50, 80. The Beetle has the lines for 30 and 50 painted red, despite a) not a manual and b) as it sits, 30 and 50 aren't sensible shift points together.

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  • public
    replied
    They are!

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  • WDWBen
    replied
    Originally posted by public View Post
    And since there's no rev gauge, the speedometer has a red zone
    I'm assuming that's what the little red dots are for; shift points!

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  • public
    replied
    And since there's no rev gauge, the speedometer has a red zone

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  • Redliner
    replied
    Originally posted by public View Post


    Yeah, the older gauge cluster is a lot more concise!
    I love how it tops out at 140km/h

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  • public
    replied
    Originally posted by public View Post




    Thinking this wheel might be a good fit for the car. Needs the correct O.B.A. boss, of course.

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  • public
    replied
    Well, that's a decent plan. However, I have no idea about the Talbot center hole.

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