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    #21
    Greasing the pads?
    GREASING the PADS?

    Jeez...*shakes head*

    "I'm sure Burger King is doing great in Germany, but they're not exactly stopping making schnitzels."

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      #22
      Originally posted by Redliner View Post
      Greasing the pads?
      GREASING the PADS?

      Jeez...*shakes head*
      Yeah, was not happy about that discovery.


      Here's the bike in assembled configuration - though I may swap the seat and paint/powdercoat some of the silver/gray parts black/graphite/'asphalt' soon. There's also going to be some hard bags in the future.















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        #23
        Great!

        "I'm sure Burger King is doing great in Germany, but they're not exactly stopping making schnitzels."

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          #24
          Here is the 919 that I sold about 6 months ago. It was a nice, fast, reliable bike but I wasn't putting any miles on it.





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            #25
            Such a sexy bike.

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              #26
              Just got back from the tax office - she's now taxed, titled, licensed, inspected and pretty much good to go. A trip over to collect a new rear tire will be the first order of business tomorrow.

              Amusingly, when I had the bike appraised (so I didn't have to pay 'perfect condition' amount of SPV-calculated sales tax), its nominal value was -$252.
              Last edited by Spectre; April 20th, 2011, 9:03 PM.

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                #27
                Originally posted by Spectre View Post
                Amusingly, when I had the bike appraised (so I didn't have to pay 'perfect condition' amount of SPV-calculated sales tax), its nominal value was -$252.
                Pah, that is nothing. When I got my nighthawk 750 appraised, it was worth -$3500.


                The sky has been falling for decades.

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                  #28
                  My model hasn't fallen quite so far down the depreciation curve yet, either.

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                    #29
                    Oh, it looks awesome! When Dave told me that they had greased the brakes...

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                      #30
                      Originally posted by Kiki View Post
                      Oh, it looks awesome! When Dave told me that they had greased the brakes...
                      If you thought he was joking - he wasn't. The previous owner really did. Previous idiot owners.

                      Like I said, the prior owner was an 'amateur alcohol enthusiast.'

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                        #31
                        Oh, BOY was this guy an alcohol enthusiast.

                        As part of getting it ready to go back into service, I decided to perform the usual servicing - fluids check, chain maintenance, etc. Since I also had to fix the leaking alternator cover (owner ineptly removed the cover part way with the intent of painting it, stopped when oil came out and bolted it back up, been leaking a little ever since), the first order of business for tonight was to drain the oil.

                        Here is the SIX quarts of oil that came out.


                        The 919's only supposed to have 3.8 quarts.

                        Yeah.

                        In other news, I did get the alternator cover off and swapped the gasket out.




                        I'll be refilling it with oil as soon as the Hondabond HT has a chance to set up (overnight) and then riding it over to a local shop for a new Avon Sprint ST rear tire.

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                          #32
                          Six quarts? How the... never mind.

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                            #33
                            Originally posted by Kiki View Post
                            Six quarts? How the... never mind.
                            The guy must have thought that he'd be racing the bike and overfilled it like race teams do with their racing cars.
                            (V) ( ;,,; ) (V)

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                              #34
                              Originally posted by Spectre View Post
                              Amusingly, when I had the bike appraised (so I didn't have to pay 'perfect condition' amount of SPV-calculated sales tax), its nominal value was -$252.
                              Originally posted by Crazyjeeper View Post
                              Pah, that is nothing. When I got my nighthawk 750 appraised, it was worth -$3500.
                              Don't suppose that means the state pays you? No? Of course not.

                              Originally posted by vikiradTG2007 View Post
                              The guy must have thought that he'd be racing the bike and overfilled it like race teams do with their racing cars.
                              Or he just filled it up to the cap or something.

                              Greased pads and 6 quarts of oil? My bike is total hack job and even that sort of scares me.
                              Saying smaller engines are better is like saying you don't want huge muscles because you wouldn't fit through the door. So what? You can bench 500. Fuck doors. - MadCat360

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                                #35
                                The repairs were successful and the bike no longer leaks oil. The adjustable handlebars are perfect and well suited to the beast. I still have to get an adjustable flasher relay so I can get the rear sequential to work 100% instead of cutting off at two or three bars.

                                The new rear Storm ST is on and while I don't have many miles on it, I am impressed so far. The first owner (before the duuuuuuude who attempted to ruin the bike) apparently had good taste in tires; so far, I think I'll be sticking with these. Reviews look good on them as well and I've ordered in a replacement front Storm ST to get everything 'new'.

                                Next up is a new RK chain, Honda front sprocket, and Sunstar (Honda's OEM) rear sprocket. Should be here in a week or so. Careful shopping has scored them for $150 total, which is significantly less than retail - though I am seriously thinking about getting a Sidewinder Sprocket Titanium II rear sprocket, which is guaranteed to last for my lifetime without significant wear. Going to start investigating and comparing automatic chain oiling systems late next month - Scottoiler is no longer the only game in town.
                                Last edited by Spectre; April 25th, 2011, 1:57 AM.

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                                  #36
                                  Bike is now in service.

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                                    #37
                                    TUTORO Chain Oiler Review and Install

                                    Thought I'd throw this up in here to avoid cluttering up the GenMoto thread.

                                    (Note: I am writing this up for three different forums, so pardon if this is a bit generic.)

                                    Part 1: Installation -

                                    I hate chain maintenance. I mean, I really, really, really hate chain maintenance. It's dirty, messy, smelly, and it's a giant pain in the arse that we wouldn't have to put up with if more UJM/generalist bikes were shaft drive like they used to and ought to be.

                                    So you can imagine my joy when I realized that my 'new' Honda 919 was going to require me to get back into chain maintenance. I immediately started looking at chain oilers and discovered that the field had expanded quite a bit and new concepts had appeared since the last time I owned a chain drive - no more being limited to the Scottoiler!

                                    My search lead me to the TUTORO (short for Top Up, Turn On, Ride Off) gravity-fed chain oiler. The Brits are going bonkers over this thing; for under £20, they can get a chain oiler that's about as good as the much more expensive Scottoiler vSystem but is easier to install. Ride Magazine in the UK raved about it (see article here) and I had bad memories of the old Scottoiler, so I decided to try one.



                                    This unit is controlled by one knob on the reservoir that serves as both on/off valve and flow control valve. You must remember to shut it off when you stop riding or you will end up with a puddle of oil and an empty (but easily refilled) reservoir. There are no vacuum or electrical connections to be made.

                                    Normally you can order direct from the company in the UK, but they just got a US distributor - one Everman Products out of California. For $32 plus shipping, a Tutoro with the dual feed was shipped to my door. Here's what's in the padded envelope:



                                    The oil, teflon tape and brass petcock are not included; the unit can operate off chain oil or motor oil. Chain oil or 10W40 are recommended - and since I couldn't find any non-aerosol oils, I went with motor oil. On the left is the bundle of two large zip ties and three smaller ones that are needed for the install. To their right are the two rubber cushions to be used for mounting the reservoir to a frame stanchion (should you do it that way, more on that in a bit), then the dual feed nozzle, the reservoir/control unit itself, the feed tube (which has some stiff coated wire in it for getting the end with the attached feed nozzle exactly where you want it.

                                    Also included is this cheapie little syringe for filling the reservoir.



                                    Sadly, the 919 doesn't have suitable rear frame trusses to strap the oiler to, so I took the suggestion of a Brit Hornet 600 rider and attached it to the rear foot peg stanchion on the left side.





                                    I accidentally ordered my oiler without the P-clips (the metal band covered in rubber you see in the pictures, basically a conduit or cable clamp - pictured below) so I had to go get some from the local home destruction store. If you ask, they include them for free - I forgot to ask. I also picked up longer stainless steel hex key bolts of various sizes to allow me to mount the oiler to the back of the existing peg mount. No drilling, tapping or anything like that required.





                                    If you have a bike with round stanchions out back, you could get away with zip-tying it to those frame members as demonstrated in the Tutoro gallery. I didn't have that option, so I tried the footpeg rather than the other ubiquitous install which is behind the license plate. At that, I just needed a 10mm socket, associated ratchet, hex key for the stock and replacement bolts, and that was all the tools required for my 919 install. The rest is all zipties (included), which is all the installation method would be for a more traditionally framed bike (no tools required in that case, other than something like a scissors or a knife to trim the hose to length.) 919 riders, you will need one M6 x 40mm stainless steel button head hex key screw to make this work - you can reuse the stock or provided hardware otherwise.



                                    I simply removed the upper footpeg mounting bolt, stuck the longer bolt in, slid the P-clipped reservoir/control valve unit onto the bolt on the other side, then put the nut on the other side and tightened it up. I then took one of the provided cushions plus one of the small zipties and secured the top of the reservoir to the footpeg guard as a little insurance against the thing going wrong and tipping over.



                                    The hardest part of it was deciding where to route the hose, followed by getting the oil nozzles properly oriented and finally discovering how many turns of the knob equaled 1 pair of drips per minute (about 1.3 or so for my setup) per the instructions. Actually, getting the metering right was what took the longest time; it was physically installed in less than 20 minutes and took a little more than 20 to determine flow rates.

                                    For the routing, a picture is worth a thousand words so I'll let the pictures do much of the talking.

                                    The hose runs down from the reservoir...


                                    Through the front large ziptie, which is tight enough to hold it in place but not enough to crush it flat; this ziptie also holds the bottom half to the swingarm. There is enough slack to allow for swingarm movement:




                                    The line continues forward to this ziptie through the stock chainguard observation port. This keeps the upper half on top while also holding it close to the swingarm and preventing it from chafing when it loops down:




                                    Note that the bottom has the coated red wire providing the shape and routing, not just the zipties. The hose runs back through the bottom of the front ziptie, back to the second ziptie, and then out to the sprocket.




                                    Note clearance between the rearset boom and the hose/swingarm.

                                    The dual feed nozzle is placed in the end of the hose and with the two pincers in contact with the sprocket well away from where the chain and sprocket meet - and in this case, somewhat close to the swingarm. The 'pincers' of the dual feed nozzle are meant to be in contact with the sprocket face on each side.


                                    Take care to get the nozzles away from the sprocket bolts and the teeth. Once you have the layout down, you then trim the reservoir end to length, leaving enough slack for the swingarm to move through its full travel, but making sure that the hose can't get into anything that might ruin your day when it flexes.

                                    The zip tie 'tags' are not cut off flush here because when the picture was taken, I was still adjusting them. Do cut off all the tags (the excess zip tie material) flush with the 'box' end once you're done.

                                    Next comes experimenting with the flow rate to get the recommended one/dual drops per minute and field testing. I'll post that up tomorrow as part two.

                                    So far, while some of this could be easier and there are some improvements to be made, it seems to be a high quality and simple system for cheap - at least so far. Will have more tomorrow after more extensive field testing.

                                    Disclaimer: I have no connection to Everman Products or Oldcroft Engineering, the maker of the Tutoro chain oiler, other than that of a customer.

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                                      #38
                                      Awesome!
                                      ||||||||||||||| Ride, Eat, Sleep, Repeat.
                                      My 1988 Lancia Delta HF Turbo
                                      My 1991 Volvo 960 Turbo

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                                        #39
                                        Ingenious little set up.

                                        Now to not think about how nasty all of my chain/sprocket bits are...

                                        Bikes:Honda VFR 800 Honda 919
                                        Ducati Multistrada 1200 S Sport
                                        Cars:Hyundai Genesis 3.8 Jaguar XJR 4.0
                                        Broken:Ford Bronco 4.9 4x4

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                                          #40
                                          Originally posted by Der Stig View Post
                                          Ingenious little set up.

                                          Now to not think about how nasty all of my chain/sprocket bits are...
                                          You're going to have to buy new ones anyway...

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