3D Printing

Matt2000

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Crosspost.

Speaking of which, is it possible to 3D print with transparent material and would you make a lid for my KitchenAid bowl? They don’t sell one for the odd size I bought, so I’ve been meaning to ask for a while.

Kind of, maybe, not really. Firstly it depends on the size, the absolute maximum diameter I can print is 15cm. @leviathan 's Prusa Mini is apparently up to 18cm. Sticking thick, flat parts together isn't very practical. Not in a way that ensures they won't just come apart, anyway.

Extrusion based prints aren't designed to be fully solid right from the start, the print would need to be at 100% infill to make it 'solid'. Even then it isn't completely solid because the infill printing isn't designed to overlap, nor is the software I use designed to allow it. CURA can do it, but I don't think that's compatible with my machine. This guy made a guide in 2018 if you're interested:

https://fenneclabs.net/index.php/2018/12/09/3d-printing-transparent-parts-using-fdm-fff-printer/

Assuming it was possible to achieve the right amount of overlap, it would need a lot of sanding to make it transparent. Then there's the issue of material properties. I exclusively use PLA and that softens relatively quickly, as I found out when I left my Smart in the sun in Italy and the shifter paddle extensions went all soft and warped. We had to flatten them out with pan and hair dryer. Anything warm in the bowl would cause it to soften, even a small amount can cause warping. PLA isn't food safe either.

A resin printer is more likely to get a good result but can only print small items and it's expensive. it's also very not food safe.

If I wanted a custom lid I'd personally be looking for someone to make one out of thin wood, cut to the correct size circle and routed to make it fit (tapered, with a lip for the top of the bowl or a channel for the rim). Then painted with food-safe paint.

TL : DR it's difficult, you probably wouldn't like the result and it might poison you. :p
 

leviathan

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There are some tutorials floating around, and something like this could actually work: https://www.printables.com/model/15310-how-to-print-glass

He suggests using clear PETG, which is also a material that happens to be food-safe. I never tried this, but I do have some clear PETG in store, so might try a small part these days, just for fun.
 

calvinhobbes

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TL : DR it's difficult, you probably wouldn't like the result and it might poison you.

Thanks very much for the explanation! Not TL, did R. 😉 The food safety issue definitely means it’s not an option, so I guess I’ll have to write to KitchenAid and ask if I’ve simply been searching in the wrong places.
 

Matt2000

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Realised today that I had an entire spool of PETG that I bought almost three years ago and didn't use. I think I was scared that my machine wouldn't be able to print with it so didn't even try. Ended up trying to today and got decent results.

I'm trying to replace the USB HDD dock that I have for the disk out of my Atomos Ninja, the one I posted about in 2020. USB 3.0 is too slow with these file sizes so I want to replace it with a SATA dock. I can't find a SATA or eSATA enclosure that will accommodate the Master Caddy in any way, so it'll have to be a 2.5" SATA bay using eSATA and USB power. That means that the Ninja is going to have to accept a 'raw' SSD. Thankfully someone already made a solution and offered it on Printables.

1662764430458.png

https://www.printables.com/model/44431-tool-less-ssd-adapter-for-atomos-ninja-v-w-extra-c

It says PETG is better, so that's what I used. Mine isn't as perfect as the one above but it's functional. I was impressed with how flexible it was.

IMG_3871_S1920.jpg
IMG_3872_S1920.jpg


It's not as good as this version either, but I'm not trying to charge $40 for about 7 grams of PETG!
https://freshmasdesigns.com/shop/p/fresh-ssd-ninjav

I'll be ordering some new parts for the printer this weekend, a Mk10 extruder mount so I can finally fit the Mk10 extruder I've had for a long time, and some stainless steel nozzles. I may re-print this part when those are fitted and see how much better it is (or isn't) with the tighter tolerances, this nozzle is still very much reamed out from the carbon fibre PLA I used. It just keeps working though.
 

Matt2000

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I got the rest of the Mk10 extruder parts and it's kind of been a disaster. In trying to use the original thermocouple with the new silicone hot end cover the copper ring end broke, a screw-in replacement I bought had wildly different temp readings, I ended up using the one from the other extruder (mine was originally a dual-extruder machine) but I don't trust it.

I can't get PLA to stick to the bed for some reason, PETG needs a massive temp increase to not have the layers separate. I'm not having fun.

I bought a cordless soldering iron from Lidl and wanted to convert it to use Makita batteries. I needed to add a 10K resistor to fool the overtemp sensing and then I printed this adapter:

https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2472385

It was a very messy print.



I thought the Einhell batteries were the same but they aren't. Not wanting to waste all of the print, I just cut the top off and screwed it to the Parkside tool with some hot glue as a backup. The electrical connections are done using wires soldered to the battery connections of the Parkside tool and attached to the battery blades I fabricated using ring terminals. It's a bodge, but it works.



It's a decent iron, especially for only £12. Mine gets up to almost 600C according to my Hakko 191 thermometer.
 
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