All your car data belong to us

jack_christie

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FIA launch car data privacy campaign

?From 2018, every new car will have a wireless box for road safety, and there is talk of retro-fitting telematics boxes into older cars,? she said. ?It?s only a small step to offering infotainment, traffic information and rest stop promotions.

?Manufacturers can track you, and lock you in to their terms and conditions. So we are pushing for dedicated privacy legislation for consumer data protection, greater consumer awareness, and a fair after-market for services.?

http://www.independent.co.uk/life-s...ersonal-information-it-may-hold-a6766931.html


FIA reveals what data is being tracked and how the public reacts to connected cars
http://www.fiaregion1.com/en/fia_region_1/news/fia-my-car-my-data.htm

http://www.mycarmydata.eu/
 
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NO THANKS! I don't want to be tracked or monitored. Once I get 2 more years paid on my Charger loan I'm trading it for a '12-14 Charger SRT8 Super Bee. I'll keep that for ever or one of us dies. :)
 
Volvo wants you to ditch car keys for its new smartphone app
Lending your car to a friend could be as easy as sending a text. That's the future Volvo is imaging with its smartphone app that enables keyless entry for the driver?and anyone with permission to enter.

Announced earlier this year and now prominently on display at the New York International Auto Show, the app does away with key fobs and puts the key right on the user's phone.
http://www.dailydot.com/technology/volvo-smartphone-app-keyless-entry/

Using the immortal quip from Top Gear - What could possibly go wrong...?
 
I can imagine many things going wrong with that without even considering malicious activities. :D
 
In principle, giving more computing power to the "key fob" can increase security... and moving away from proprietary hardware can be a step in the right direction as well.
Granting and revoking access to digital keys is nothing new, for example many building security systems with RFID cards are essentially the same - a very long number on a device, and a system knowing the number with the associated permissions granting access or not.

The big question is how well the system will be designed and built though.
 
I'll be curious to see how this affects the used car market over the coming years. Older cars without 'smart' technology could become much more valuable to people who prize privacy. On the other side of the coin, I already hear from my younger, tech-savvy friends about all the bells and whistles they're hoping their next car has...

As far as I'm concerned, I'll very likely not buy another new car in my lifetime, so it really doesn't matter to me!
I would like one more new truck; but, as little as I drive them, I could probably put up with the electronic nonsense.

SL
 
the data is not wirelessly transmitted and is only accessible from inside the car itself.

many worry that the law enforcement agencies and insurance providers can use the data [in EDR devices] to spy on drivers.

I was wondering why the article was on mathworks.com. Turns out it's just an ad overselling the use of MATLAB for machine learning. If the police have physical access to your car, they could just install their own GPS tracking device. :rolleyes:
 
Drive A Mazda? Your Privacy Could Be Gone In 10 Seconds

Two researchers who've been probing one of the car maker's models in recent months found the vehicle was collecting an awful lot of information from drivers' smartphones, including text messages, call records, app activity, photos, contacts, GPS history and emails. And it was storing all that information unencrypted, they claim. They later discovered a way to install malware on the car, forcing it not only to hand over all that information, but track the location of the vehicle in almost real-time.
https://www.forbes.com/sites/thomasbrewster/2018/03/09/mazda-privacy-hack-via-usb
 
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Given the hackability of Mazda's infotainment system (which also allows some useful or at least cool features to be installed) and the general abilit to connect to a phone via Bluetooth, this is actually not surprising. Thanks for the hint. :)
 
SquareLeft;n3292107 said:
I'll be curious to see how this affects the used car market over the coming years. Older cars without 'smart' technology could become much more valuable to people who prize privacy.

Absolutely. Seeing older fords with the first gen Sync system looks like the UI of the prototype iPhone you see pop up on eBay once in a while. I’d typically much rather have a dot matrix style radio system like the basic radio systems you used to see in fords of the mid-late 2000s. Makes the interior feel less dated somehow.
 
93Flareside;n3547256 said:
Absolutely. Seeing older fords with the first gen Sync system looks like the UI of the prototype iPhone you see pop up on eBay once in a while. I’d typically much rather have a dot matrix style radio system like the basic radio systems you used to see in fords of the mid-late 2000s. Makes the interior feel less dated somehow.

First gen sync IS a dot matrix style radio system ;)
 
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All your data belongs to LandRover?

How car dealers could be stealing your data​

Personal data is supposed to be private, but dealers and insurers have been accused of downloading it from cars without permission
 
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