Ownership Verified: Another Tesla lurking in the shadows...

Loving all the detail you see in the app! Mine just says 'charging' or "waiting' or whatever... I need to check the car to see the charging speed, and even then I don't get any details like this (only kw)...

Also : 11,3 even! How is that possible?

230v x 16 amp x 3 phase = 11,04 kw
I didn't know Tesla's could take more than 11?
 
Also : 11,3 even! How is that possible?

230v x 16 amp x 3 phase = 11,04 kw
I didn't know Tesla's could take more than 11?
Yeah that’sa bit strange… but the screenshot has an explanation also: 229 V x 15.9 A + 232 V x 16.2 A (???) + 230 V x 16.0 A = 11.08 kW … soooo that doesn’t work out 🙈 what I find partially weird is the imbalance between the phases (current).

Edit: In a different view of the app it’s even listed as 11.32 kW, so it’s not the result of too few decimal places or whatever other shenanigans…
 
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Voltage can be higher than 230V sometimes. I've seen my car charge at 242V at a hotel once, no idea what their grid was doing but it was happy pulling that from all three phases :)
 
Voltage can be higher than 230V sometimes. I've seen my car charge at 242V at a hotel once, no idea what their grid was doing but it was happy pulling that from all three phases :)
Well yeah, but in this case, according to the charger, it wasn’t 😛 only on one phase and only a tiny little bit… still weird that the Tesla onboard charger would pull more than 16 A - also only on one phase. Actually… this could all be due to the measurements of the Charger not being all that reliable. Sounds like the most reasonable assumption here 🤣
 
^ I had a Model 3 loaner when my Golf was getting bodywork done, and that one also said it could pull 3,8 kW from my 16a connection at the time (which shouldn't be possible given what the charger could deliver).

And yes, voltage is different depending on many factors, for some reason I have a particularly high voltage here (242 volts measured last time by an electrician), which may be due to living closer to one of those electrical distribution box things, dunno for sure.
Apparently this causes old lightbulbs to short out faster since they were designed to take 240 volts maximum, and they're always on max capacity. Doesn't really matter anymore since pretty much all lightbulbs I have are LEDs now (some exceptions are halogen). Thankfully this doesn't mean my other electrical equipment shorts out faster.
But even so, this does not mean my car will take the extra voltage, as the highest I've seen on my EV6 = 7,3 kw (32 amps x 230v = 7,36 kw maximum). It should be getting closer to 7,7 kw (32 amps x 242 v = 7,74kw) but it never does. Should probably test this with another Tesla, anyone want to borrow me one? I'm quite bored of my Ford Puma loaner car anyways :p

Since Tesla's can switch from 1 phase/32 amp to 3 phase / 16 amp, maybe they can also take a bit more amperage ?
 
quoting myself from over in noodle's thread:
But what the whole thing shows me (also the regular 80% thing) is that I'd be perfectly happy going leviathans route and driving a 60kWh LFP model 3 - it wouldn't change a thing or make it any more or less useful of a car to me. Even on long drives I'm more often than not actually hounded by the fast charging (i.e. I have to get going because the car's finished), rather than having to wait for the charge to finish. bring on the highland refresh, don't stuff it up and I might even think about replacing my early model for a new one :p
switched back to the TNA summers last week. notices again how much noise those suckers make and how the tread pattern has lead to this weird grinding noise sensation thing. also noticed how crap my brake discs look despite more actively using the brakes regularly - so yeah, I will probably have to have those replaced before the next TÜV :|
nothing else to report. car charges exclusively at home now. as i type this the photovoltaics are being put up and will hopefully go into operation next week or week after that (ughh bureaucracy). will be interesting to see how the combination of PV (~14 kWp), stationary battery (~14 kWh), heat pump and car will result in - or rather: how much of my own juice (yeah yeah) will actually end up in the car. we'll see! exciting times!
 
^that! Since you have a "smart" charger does this mean you can set it up to only charge when the solar is giving you enough juice, making it so that you are effectively getting "free" energy?
I kinda want the same setup, but given the miles I do, and how shitty the weather is, I'd have to spend a lot more time at home charging when it's sunny (which is almost never)
 
^that! Since you have a "smart" charger does this mean you can set it up to only charge when the solar is giving you enough juice, making it so that you are effectively getting "free" energy?
I kinda want the same setup, but given the miles I do, and how shitty the weather is, I'd have to spend a lot more time at home charging when it's sunny (which is almost never)
This would be of interest to me also, I am in WFH though, so I could just purely charge my car from Solar when generating enough...
 
^that! Since you have a "smart" charger does this mean you can set it up to only charge when the solar is giving you enough juice, making it so that you are effectively getting "free" energy?
Yes, that was exactly why I got the ugly-ass charger from Fronius (a re-branded go-e), as it communicates with the inverter out of the box without raspi shenanigans. It basically has 3 modes I can cycle through via app or button on the charger: one takes only PV, one takes only PV but will fill up a defined amount overnight if there's not enough... and then of course the "just go" type. plus I can theoretically set the power manually, but why would I?
I'm hoping that with two days of WFH per week + weekends I will have enough solar juice to satisfy most of my charging needs. for half the year at least. in winter: not so much. also I will have to see what's what with the heat pump and the battery in the basement.

for the PV project, this is what's currently happening:
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since north is up, you can see that our roof is fairly shit for PV and we're mostly putting stuff on an ENE-facing roof. that's because the neighbours roof, which is rotated 90° to ours, got extended into our roof ... whatever you may want to call that shit. so the "better half" of the roof is cut into triangles, which don't take large rectangular panels well :D the south facing side of the house additionally has a ~11m long balcony which is in dire need of a new railing (40yo wooden slats, disintegrating), so I have additional PV modules coming for that. but I'll have to do that myself at a later date because no regular PV installer wanted to do that (too much hassle compared to roof install it seems).

anyway, what's going up on the roof is 33 modules of 420Wp each. then there's a BYD battery box HVM of 5 modules for 13.8 kWh of storage, both attached to a Fronius Symo Gen24 10 kW inverter. Yes the modules could do more than 10 kW, but the way they're put up on the roof, they never actually will. the balcony will add another 2.5 kW or so on top of that, once I actually get that done. I'll be using some boring Hoymiles micro-inverter for that and just wiring it in (yes yes having it wired in) - makes most sense, really.

the good thing about the Fronius inverter is, it'll just accept other "sources" of power for its battery and EV charging algorithms. since it comes with a meter that looks at the grid connection directly, it mostly ignores what its own solar generation is and will thus also take into account other "dumb" solar installs running in parallel. in theory. will have to see how it goes.

also also: install is happening as i type this, and they'll probably finish today. but it can't go live because the bloody grid operator has to come and install the right meters and shit. ugh.
 
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Things are happening:
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... that bloody ivnerter could've been made 200€ cheaper if they'd just gone and used a conventional heat sink instead of that fancy ass, huge aluminium cast piece ffs!
 
I don't know why but I would really want to disguise that battery pack as an Alex set of drawers, just for shits and giggles. I'm liking the plan and progress, that heatsink does seem unnecessarily large unless the unit was specced for super low noise.
 
that heatsink does seem unnecessarily large unless the unit was specced for super low noise.
tbh it's even one of the very few units that does active cooling at all - most of the competition does passive cooling only. noise doesn't bother me in the slightest in that basement down there, anyway :p makes it all the more strange, really, because it doesn't need to be this fancy in the first place, nobody's ever going to see it again, once it disappears behind the plastic cover (like a bmw v8 :|). also: making it a few cm slimmer because of fancy heatsink design doesn't make any sense either - it's huge as it is, may as well make it a few cm thicker and save on $$$.

oh well, don't care, rest of the system is so bloody expensive that it doesn't make a difference anyway.
 
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it liiiives! this is with fairly grey and overcast sky, I am impressed. ... the installers the promptly turned the whole system off again, because this is germany after all and I now have to wait for the DSO to change out my meter because otherwise that'd just start running backwards :D assholes. also I haven't connected the charger yet - will do that once the system actually goes live with the new meter. no idea when that's going to be though, because DSOs apparently have too much shit to do... also I need a bloody password for that which I don't have :|
 
love the sandals in that shot. Very German of you.
hahaha, I was waiting for that comment, to be honest :D had to be someone eagle-eyed enough to spot the bloody doctor-style-sandals (the white ones were half the price of any other color get off my back)...
 
I should show this to a work colleague who had panels fitted after buying a Toyota hybrid with no plug-in capability. As an aside I really like that house design, it seems like the perfect combination between a single floor bungalow and a bigger house.
 
I should show this to a work colleague who had panels fitted after buying a Toyota hybrid with no plug-in capability.
oh well... depending on how many he has and how metering is handled in the UK, that doesn't have to be a bad thing. I have a friend in NL, for example, who still enjoys net metering - so any energy he doesn't use himself and puts into the grid is calculated against his consumption that he takes from the grid. insane. meanwhile I will get some 8ct/kWh for every kWh I supply to the grid, but pay 30+ for every kWh I take.
As an aside I really like that house design, it seems like the perfect combination between a single floor bungalow and a bigger house.
yeah we can't complain, but it does have its limitations. it takes a fairly large footprint from the plot and the upstairs rooms are in part limited by the low roof line. i.e. on the right there, the lowest triangle is basically just storage you can crawl into. we actually made the bathroom (far side under the right roof) some 50cm shorter because the roof would've been to low to use the right hand side wall of the room for anything - you could've sat on the toilet, but never get up because you'd hit your head, for example :p
also that 90° angled part of the roof (the part that's continued from the neighbour) is purely cosmetic... we don't have access into the added volume - which we don't need anyway, but still. anyhoo, house in total is larger than we need anyway, so we don't really care about those shortcomings in the slightest. also, as stated before, the roof orientation is a bit shitty for PV, but that could in turn result in a better usage pattern (i.e. more generation in the mornings/afternoon rather than the typical mid-day peak), because it'll allow us to use more of the generated electricity ourselves, rather than feed the grid (see above for ridiculously low compensation).
 
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