Anyone have experience with micro 4/3rds format cameras?

eizbaer

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time to double-cross-post!
importing 2,5k pictures for the timelapse via usb2 does take a while... i should've been thorough and not only set the damn camera to jpg but also to a reduced resolution :neutral: 16mp really is overkill for a damn engine-swap timelapse...

edit 1: uploading... (3/0.5 dsl is ossum for this, yes...)

edit 2: the eagle-eyed viewer will notice the video speed up considerably at some point (fairly early on) because i switched from one picture every 2 sec to one pic every 6 sec after realizing i had goofed my calculations about amount of pictures taken and battery life and all that (still fairly impressed with the 2270 pictures i got out of about 1.5 batteries, considering they're rated at 350pics per battery).

edit 3: video will be here soon


edit 4: if anyone involved in FGTV (or anyone else, really) wants to edit this to have the intro and maybe show the final frame for a little longer, feel free to grab the original mp4 (still uploading, check back later) and mess about with it as much as you like (i can't be bothered, i still have sundays headache).

edit 5: added generic youtube music for your enjoyment :grin:

used the timelapse feature extensively last weekend at beni's garage meet, where we took the engine out of the zastava. very happy with it (except for the 999 picture limit, after that you have to restart), especially with the battery life. rated at 350 pictures or something (i think), i got 2270 timelapse fotos using 1.5 battery charges (the second one is still going, so i don't quite know). the above starts out with 2 second intervals and changes to 6 second intervals at some point (because i can't maths).
 

marcos_eirik

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The first week of February Olympus will launch the E-M5II, this is what we know about it so far:
- Same E-M5 16MP sensor
- Update processor (improves slightly the IQ)
- No PDAF
- New sensor shift shooting that allows to combine 8 pictures in one to create a 40 Megapixel image
- Improved 5 axis stabilization
- It does have clean hdmi-out
- all common frame rates and video optimized af-algorithm.
- 50Mb/s all 1080p (no 4K recording)

Reminder: The new Olympus camera coming during the first week of February will be called Olympus E-M5II (or E-M5 Mark II). And the big new feature of the camera is ?sensor shift? shooting. The camera has a 16 Megapixel sensor that can shoot up to 40 Megapixel by shifting the sensor (in up to 8 frames of single shots).

oly_e-m5ii_silver_f001.jpg


oly_e-m5ii_silver_t001.jpg


oly_e-m5ii_silver_b001.jpg


The E-M5II will also be launched with a new horizontal grip:
Olympus-E-M5II-camera1-550x383.jpg


The vertical grip from the old E-M5 is reused:
Olympus-E-M5II-camera-HLD-8G%EF%BC%8BHLD-6P-550x389.jpg


The E-M5 will also be bundled with a new flash:
Olympus-E-M5II-camera-with-FL-LM3-flash-550x372.jpg


The new accessories.
 

eizbaer

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I saw that too and must say I am not really impressed. The 40 mpix gimmick does not really interest me and apart from that it's mostly just the e-m5 again (leaving out video). PDAF would have been very nice.
The design however I do like. It's not a major change, but slightly bigger dials should help. Not sure about the cluster of buttons on top, but I guess it'll work. The thumb buttons on my camera aren't the most comfortable. Also what happened to the on off switch, that seems quite hard to reach now.

Oh well, in conclusion: not terribly excited, not something I can see me swapping my e-m10 for.
 

killpanda

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The on/off switch is actually similar to the old OM SLRs as well as the E-M1. I find it much easier to reach when one handed than the current E-M5's switch.
 

marcos_eirik

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I saw that too and must say I am not really impressed. The 40 mpix gimmick does not really interest me and apart from that it's mostly just the e-m5 again (leaving out video). PDAF would have been very nice.
The design however I do like. It's not a major change, but slightly bigger dials should help. Not sure about the cluster of buttons on top, but I guess it'll work. The thumb buttons on my camera aren't the most comfortable. Also what happened to the on off switch, that seems quite hard to reach now.

Oh well, in conclusion: not terribly excited, not something I can see me swapping my e-m10 for.
I don't think this will tempt too many to upgrade from their current E-M5s, but the improved design might attract more customers to Olympus. The improved controls placement from the E-M1 will also be a factor, a few of those I know didn't get comfortable with the control wheels of the E-M5, liked the slim body and placement on the E-M10, but also having the option of a full grip whenever that's needed. This also adds improvements to the image processor, focus peaking and video, so that definitely won't happen to the E-M5 via firmware. I would also have liked the addition of PDAF to the E-M5II. The 40 Mp function is more than a gimmick for landscape photographers though, and I think that, and the new 7-14/2.8 will be a big thing for them.

The grip now looks even more like the old Olympus Motor Drive from the OM-series:
d0068664_16461954.jpg
 

marcos_eirik

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Now this is more like it:
On Thursday February 5 at 6 London time Olympus will announce their new products. As usual you can follow the live blogging here on 43rumors to get all the news you need. Here are some additional info I got in those last days:

? E-M5II shoots up to 10fps
? Shutter speed 1/16.000 (!)
? The E-M5II has the so far best stabilization system (even better than the one used by the E-M1). 5 stop compensation (and other improvements for video recording too).
? The body is also ?Freeze? proof like the E-M1
? Price in Euro is 1099 for the body only.
? Body weights 420 gramm
? Shipping End of February already

oly_e-m5ii_bk_f001.jpg


Edit, with updated info:
? the sensor shift shooting mode takes 63 Megapixel RAW or 40 megapixel JPEG pictures
? The maximum bit rate is 77Mbps in ALL-I. 52Mbps in IPB
? fastest mecahnical shutter is 1/8000. Electronic shutter 1/16000 seconds
? They got the info that the camera shoots at 11fps (my info is that it?s 10 fps!)
? ISO 100 ? 25600
? Size_ 123.7mm x 85mm x 44.5mm
? Weighs 417g (body only). 469g (including battery and memory card)
? Usable temperature is -10 degrees to 40 degrees (at the time of operation). -20 Degrees to 60 degrees (when saving)
? Available humidity 30-90% (operation). 10-90% (when saving)
 
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marcos_eirik

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In the end, the upgrades done to the E-M5II seems to amount to more than the sum of their parts:

Those are some of the most interesting feedback from the reviewers:

TheCameraStoreTV:
? Sensor is update. 1 stop better low light performance compared to the E-m1 (43rumors note: No other reviewer noticed such an improvement. Take the statement with a grain of salt!).
? 40 Megapixel high resolution mode works with the electronic shutter to make very fast multiple shots.
? Has in best in camera stabilization we have seen.

Robin Wong:
? Feels even more solid than the original E-M5
? Mechanical shutter sound is somewhat more refined, and silent, in comparison to the E-M1 or E-M10
? The improvements to the 5-Axis Image Stabilization was evident, and a huge welcome, especially when it comes to video recording.

Dpreview:
? The Mark II?s construction is some of the best we?ve encountered outside the pro DSLR sphere: an improvement over the original OM-D.
? High resolution mode: Because the first four steps ensure the Olympus is sampling all colors at all pixel positions (in addition to then repeating the process for an offset position), it means super-fine detail doesn?t result in false color. In addition, it also ensures that the camera?s color resolution is as high as its luminance resolution (something we?ve only seen before with Sigma?s Foveon technology). This becomes clearly visible in the final crops, where despite the two image?s similar pixel counts, the Olympus image is able to much more accurately render the color resolution targets.

DSLRmagazine (Spanish):
? Coming months a specific Adobe plugin should come to be able to process the 63 megabyte RAW files created by the Multishot feature (they have a full Mutlishot test with the 40MP JPEG files).

Press images here of the E-M5II and accessories here.

There was a Olympus rep at Scandinavian Photo in Oslo on launch day, so I had the chance to try it out. I really like the new shutter which is very silent, the electronic shutter is also good, the option of using 1/16000s is very nice. The build quality felt very solid, a definite upgrade from the original E-M5, more like the E-M1, also liked the button placement, lots of configureable buttons. There will also be a firmware update for the E-M1, looking forward to that.

The 8mm f1.8 Fisheye looks interesting as well, though I must confess I'd rather it was rectilinear. Together with the 7-14/2.8, 12-40/2.8, 40-150/2.8, and 300/4, mFT is turning into a very serious system, also for professionals.
 

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Have any of you made the switch from DSLR to the mFT?

I have Nikon D7000 (and an older Sigma 17-70, f/2.8-4.5 macro), which I almost don't use any more because of how massive it is. I still love the D7000, and it's really versatile, but I'm thinking that I'd better unload it while it's still worth something. I reckon I can get at least 500eur for the combo.

I have absolutely no idea what to replace it with, though, because I've never been interested in compact cameras until now. Is Olympus the top dog in micro four-thirds? Purely visually I like the rectangular shape of the Panasonic GX7 more than the OM-D. Are electronic viewfinders any good? Or is this irrelevant now, and everyone uses LCD? I'd like an optical viewfinder, but I suppose that's out of the question now.

And what about pancake zooms? Are they just a placeholder for a proper lens, or would I get my money's worth with something like Zuiko or Lumix 14-42?

I also go on assumption that modern mirrorless are not too far behind on focusing speed compared to DSLR, produce raw files and in general offer similar dynamic range and good ISO performance. Tell me if I'm wrong :)

And finally, if I'll only be using one lens, what is the reson to not get a fixed-lens compact for similar money?
 

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Also, Fujis look so damn nice. X100 and X20 have that rangefinder look I very much like :) I suppose X30 is ok too. But only the X100 has a larger sensor, but also a fixed normal lens and quite a pricetag.

I'd like to know how X20 or X30 compares to similar sized micro four-thirds cameras with similar lenses.
 

killpanda

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I have the original X100, awesome camera that you can buy used for a fraction of the price new.

Be mindful of Fuji though, although they have improved their AF speeds, they're still severely lacking compared to DSLRs or even other mirrorless.

I hear the GX7 is very good, but the in-body IS isn't as good as Olympus'. While it's not an issue with Panasonic's lenses that are already stabilised, most pancakes aren't.

The first batches of Pancake zooms were quite bad, but the latest ones (the 12-30 of the GM-1/5 and the 14-42 of the E-M10) have received good reviews I believe.


If you plan on using only one lens though, you should definitely look into one of those fixed-lens compacts. I've used the LX100 quite a lot and it's an awesome machine. Same sensor as the GX7 and great zoom lens (eq. 24-70 f/1.7-f/2.8).


Regarding EVFs, I've only used a few OVFs mostly on cheap DSLRs and old SLRs, and I mostly prefer EVFs at this point. While they have their issues (hard to see in the darkness and can sometimes be a bit slow), the fact that you get a pretty accurate view of your exposure before taking the shot is great. Also, focus peaking helps manual focus a lot.
 

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Thanks, that's good info. I haven't looked at LX100 at all yet, looks like it could be a candidate. But it is essentially the same price or more (900?) as the GX7 with pretty much any pancake lens (body is 490?).

This is a starting point, I guess. In any case, I wasn't planning to spend much more than what I can get for D7000, so I'll have to see what's available used.
 

killpanda

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I know you don't like the body as much, but used original E-M5 and at a stretch even an E-M10 should fit in your budget.


The Sony RX100 also comes to mind for a fixed lens compact, if the lack of EVF isn't an dealbreaker on the older models.
 

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I'll hijack this a bit since there already was a discussion about RX100 and GX7...

I'm looking to get a 'proper' compact camera that I can keep with me everywhere I go since the DSLR kit is quite cumbersome for that. Essentially my main criteria is RAW capability, small size (needs to fit into a pocket) and reasonable price. I'm planning on getting a second hand one and so far I've been keeping my eyes open for Canon Powershot S110/S120 and Sony RX100, but people don't seem to be overly keen to get rid of those. So, any suggestions for other alternatives that fit those specs and don't cost an arm and a leg would be welcome.
 

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I'll hijack this a bit since there already was a discussion about RX100 and GX7...

I'm looking to get a 'proper' compact camera that I can keep with me everywhere I go since the DSLR kit is quite cumbersome for that. Essentially my main criteria is RAW capability, small size (needs to fit into a pocket) and reasonable price. I'm planning on getting a second hand one and so far I've been keeping my eyes open for Canon Powershot S110/S120 and Sony RX100, but people don't seem to be overly keen to get rid of those. So, any suggestions for other alternatives that fit those specs and don't cost an arm and a leg would be welcome.
Sony alpha6000 with the kit lens. Very compact package offering great image quality.
 

eizbaer

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Sony alpha6000 with the kit lens. Very compact package offering great image quality.

if the sony an option, so is the olympus E-M10 or an older E-M5 with the pancake zoom... or E-PL7, slightly smaller, maybe cheaper.

also: olympus pls, i want to see some rumours on the E-M1mk2 :|
 
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Hazardous

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I'll check the Sony out in a camera shop, but based on the specs I'd say it's too bulky for my purposes. I'm really looking for something small enough so that I can't use the 'it's too big to carry around' excuse.
 

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Olympus OM-D E-M5II Ti:
OM-D E-M5 Mark II Limited Edition evokes titanium-plated OM icon

Award-winning OM-D pays homage to 90s titanium classic
Southend, 12 May 2015 ? For fans of landmark high-end cameras, the 1994 OM-3Ti is an all-time classic, and now collectors can acquire a contemporary homage to this titanium-clad SLR icon: a limited-edition version of its most recent OM-D descendant, the TIPA award-winning OM-D E-M5 Mark II*. The beautifully redesigned E-M5 Mark II will be available in a distinctively retro, titanium-tinted body that evokes the golden age of the original Olympus OM series, a period that laid the foundations for the flagship Olympus Micro Four Thirds cameras of today. In addition to the titanium colour, the Limited Edition differs from the regular model with a special OM-D-branded leather strap, an owner?s card bearing a quote from the legendary OM designer, Yoshihisa Maitani, and a premium-stitched leather case for the card. A number between one and 7,000 will appear on the other side of the card, as only 7,000 of these cameras are due to be made. The OM-D E-M5 Mark II Limited Edition will be available from June 2015 as the body only, or in a kit with the all-round zoom M.ZUIKO DIGITAL ED 14-150mm 1:4.0-5.6 II lens. The body will retail for ?999.99. The lens kit will cost ?1349.99.

One portable icon deserves another
Although some 20 years have passed since the launch of the OM-3Ti, the OM-D E-M5 Mark II Limited Edition has much in common with its illustrious forebear, and not just visually. Both offer serious photographers a more portable, high-grade alternative to bulkier SLRs. The 1980s and 90s cemented the OM series? reputation for compact, lightweight, go-anywhere system cameras as well as innovations such as the air damper that muffled the shock of mirror movement or the multi-spot metering mechanism beloved of professional owners of the OM-4. The E-M5 Mark II continues that tradition with its minimal dimensions, rugged build, and the world?s most powerful** 5-axis Image Stabilization system. This ? as the TIPA award jury pointed out ? makes it ideal for high-speed, spontaneous photography on the move (?a breakthrough technology that handles virtually every shooting situation.?).

OM-D E-M5 Mark II Limited Edition AT A GLANCE:
> Exclusive collector?s item with just 7,000 due to be built
> Distinctive titanium-style finish pays evokes the iconic OM-3Ti
> Supplied with luxurious OM-Dbranded leather strap, exclusive owner?s card and premium leather card case

A titan in titanium
Beginning with the launch of the OM-1 in 1973, Yoshihisa Maitani?s breakthrough series married form with professional-grade function, and the OM-3Ti was the beautiful ? and practical ? culmination of this design philosophy. Its titanium plates were not just lighter than aluminium, they were also more resistant to corrosion and heat, and fully six times more robust. Visually, they ensured the OM-3Ti stood out from every other camera available at that time.

The OM-D E-M5 Mark II Limited Edition pays homage to this heritage with a striking new colour and a number of unmistakable OM design cues. In addition to the familiar, angular OM contours, prism mount and low centre of gravity, the new camera woos collectors with its distinctive titanium-style finish as well as the exquisitely knurled dials and shutter release. From the perspective of its owner, the controls ooze state-of-the-art optical precision.

20th-century history, 21st-century quality
The design of the OM-D E-M 5 Mark II Limited Edition may hark back to the 80s and 90s, but in every other respect it is very much a cutting-edge example of the best optical engineering on offer today, as acknowledged by TIPA when they singled out a number of features (other than the 5-axis IS) for praise: ?Housed in a dustproof, splashproof and freeze-proof magnesium alloy body, the 16.1 Megapixel 4/3 Live MOS sensor and TruePic VII processor of the Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II deliver a wide array of creative imaging options and an ISO up to 25,600. The camera sports a 2.36 million-dot Electronic Viewfinder and a 3-inch 1,037K-dot swivel touchscreen LCD monitor. Its extremely quick Fast AF boasts an 81-point area, excellent low-light performance and tracking AF, delivering fast AF for the camera?s 10 frames-per-second rate at full resolution. The camera also has a special ?High-Res Shot? option that is said to deliver resolution equivalent to a 40 Megapixel sensor by combining 8 shots into a single JPEG using sensor shift.?

Of course, the most recent addition to Olympus? OM-D family will be celebrated primarily for its remarkable titanium looks, luxurious leather accessories and the powerful sense of heritage it conveys to anyone who holds it. But in essence it remains a sophisticated tool for the spontaneous creative photographer and videographer. It is smaller and much lighter than comparable SLRs and, as such, it enables filmmakers to capture handheld movies outdoors without carrying additional, bulky equipment ? blur- and noise-free ? irrespective of poor light. As a tribute to his benchmark OM cameras of yesteryear, Yoshihisa Maitani would surely approve.

MAIN FEATURES:
> The world?s most powerful* 5-axis in-body Image Stabilization system for blur-free video and still shooting without a tripod, gyro rig or Steadicam?. System enhancement equivalent to 5 steps of shutter speed.

> Highly portable, lightweight, compact and premium design with dust-, splash- and freezeproof housing for shooting outdoors in rough conditions
> OM-D Movie Mode for 1080 Full HD 60p video at 52Mbps with flexible frame rates, incl. classic 24p, for atmospheric, cinema-like movie recording
> 3? vari-angle touchscreen and large, bright Electronic Viewfinder with automatic eye detection and 2.36 million dots for a crystal-clear view
> Spectacular 40-Megapixel composite still shot capability that exceeds entry-level D-SLR image quality
> Built-in WiFi for remote control shooting (aperture, shutter speed and Live Bulb) and sharing via a smartphone with OI.Share software

The inspiration for this, the OM-3Ti:
OM-3Ti_black__Product_350.jpg


OM-D_E-M5_Mark_II_Limited_Edition_OM-3__ProductAdd_001.jpg


The E-M5II Ti
OM-D_E-M5_Mark_II_Limited_Edition_Cardcase_Ownerscard_strap__ProductAdd_001.jpg


OM-D_E-M5_Mark_II_Limited_Edition_black__Product_010.jpg


OM-D_E-M5_Mark_II_Limited_Edition_black__Product_180.jpg


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OM-D_E-M5_Mark_II_Limited_Edition_black__Product_270.jpg


M.Zuiko 7-14mm f2.8 Pro and 8mm f1.8 Fisheye Pro:
Professional-grade Olympus lens range expands again with world?s brightest* Fisheye lens and a fast ultra wide-angle zoom lens plus a new underwater accessory.

Elite M.ZUIKO PRO series now covers the entire range from wide to super telephoto
Southend, 12 May 2015 ? Olympus has added two new professional-level Micro Four Thirds lenses to its rapidly expanding M.ZUIKO PRO flagship range: the extremely bright M.ZUIKO DIGITAL ED 8mm Fisheye 1:1.8 PRO and the M.ZUIKO DIGITAL ED 7-14mm 1:2.8 PRO. Considering the Micro Four Thirds crop factor of 2x, this new duo means the M.ZUIKO PRO family now offers professional and semi-pro photographers, as well as ambitious enthusiasts, five dedicated lenses for the entire focal range ? from 14mm super wide angle to 300mm super telephoto in the 35mm equivalent. The world?s brightest fisheye lens*, the M.ZUIKO DIGITAL ED 8mm Fisheye 1:1.8 PRO will retail for ?799.99 while the M.ZUIKO DIGITAL ED 7-14mm 1:2.8 PRO will cost ?999.99. Both lenses are available from June 2015.

M.ZUIKO PRO lenses are developed and built to the very highest standards and deliver the best image quality ever achieved by Olympus optical equipment. Designed to provide ultimate mobility to photographers who travel light and want to shoot on the fly, they combine the highest optical performance with the compact and lightweight design of Micro Four Thirds cameras. Alongside practical features like the full weatherproofing, Olympus? uncompromising lens architecture, cutting-edge ZERO lens coating*** lens technology and seriously fast autofocus all combine to give the M.ZUIKO PRO range the edge over heavier DSLR lenses. For professionals and highachieving non-professionals alike, low weight is one of the PRO?s most appealing features. By combining several PRO lenses with lightweight, compact Micro Four Thirds camera bodies, they can put together a fully equipped system that could weigh just half of the equivalent kit for a DSLR.

Together with these two new lenses, Olympus is introducing a new accessory for advanced underwater photography with the M.ZUIKO Digital ED 8mm Fisheye 1:1.8 PRO. The extremely compact PPO-EP02 Dome Port perfectly matches the size of the new Fisheye lens, and it?s dedicated optical design brings out the lenses best macro performance, even underwater. This new accessory will retail for ?699.99 from July 2015.

Pros choose PRO
The two new additions to the award-winning M.ZUIKO PRO series mean photographers now have an optically outstanding, compact and lightweight lens option for every bandwidth along the focal length range from wide-angle to super telephoto. M.ZUIKO PRO lenses are ideal for fast-moving, spontaneous shooting styles and are fast becoming the go-to brand for professional and semi-pro Micro Four Thirds owners looking to complete a comprehensive, high-quality lens line-up ? as well as current DSLR users who need a more practical, more mobile and inconspicuous alternative to unwieldy cameras and heavy kit bags.

Apart from being fully weatherproof, all M.ZUIKO PRO lenses are equipped with Olympus cutting-edge thin ZERO coating*** technology that keeps ghosts and flares to a minimum. Moreover, the extraordinary strength of this coating also prevents scratches and maintains the lens? stable low-refractive performance.

The first lens in the PRO series ? the powerful M.ZUIKO DIGITAL ED 12-40mm 1:2.8 PRO ? immediately set the benchmark for rivals to follow when it was voted ?Best Compact System Zoom Lens? in 2014 by EISA. The EISA jury summed up some of the key strengths that make the PRO series stand out: ?This fast and weather-sealed standard zoom has impressive optical qualities, solid mechanical build quality and a superb focus control that combines manual focus with silent, quick AF. It is also a very compact lens, in spite of its fast 1:2.8 maximum aperture.?

That success was followed by the first telephoto zoom, the M.ZUIKO DIGITAL ED 40-150mm 1:2.8 PRO zoom lens, that is likewise more compact and lighter than a typical APS-C or full-frame lens with comparable characteristics and scope of performance. Its unrivalled DUAL VCM focussing system made it another PRO world-record holder ? it?s the first system to power two high-grade lens elements using dual linear motors, which makes it beautifully quick and quiet when you?re shooting wildlife, people and other camera-shy, potentially fast-moving subjects.

The new fast ultra-wide zoom PRO
The new splash and dustproof M.ZUIKO DIGITAL ED 7-14mm 1:2.8 PRO is the first wide-angle zoom lens in the M.ZUIKO PRO series. It inherits both the compact and lightweight M.ZUIKO PRO design as well as the optical fireworks. Like the new Fisheye PRO, the 7-14mm wide-angle zoom lens guarantees excellent optical performance quality from edge to edge. For example, with starscapes, it reproduces stars as circular points of light, even on the periphery of the frame. It?s also packed with practical PRO features, such as the manual focus clutch that lets you instantly switch from AF to MF by pulling the focus ring toward the camera body. There?s also an L-Fn button on the base of the lens that lets you make changes in an instant with your thumb ? to one of your preferred pre-assignable settings.

Like the rest of the PRO family, this versatile and fast-focusing newcomer is fully weatherproof ? thanks to 11 separate seals ? and it?s out in the field that the wide-angle zoom comes into its own. It lets you get just 7.5cm from your subject (measured from the end of the lens), which is about 20% closer than equivalent rivals. Of course, the depth of field makes for excellent wideangle backgrounds. The M.ZUIKO DIGITAL ED 7-14mm 1:2.8 PRO weighs just over half as much as equivalent 1:2.8 aperture rivals, so it?s perfect for spontaneous hand-held shooting, by day or at night. The combination with OM-D powerful in-body image stabilization ensures even wide angle shots come out sharp and clear.

The world?s first 1:1.8 Fisheye lens
From under the sea to the night sky, the record-breaking new M.ZUIKO DIGITAL ED 8mm Fisheye 1:1.8 PRO is an unprecedented opportunity to add stand-out creativity and a uniquely dynamic and abstract look to extremely wide-angle shots of the natural world. Unprecedented, because ? in this category ? the Fisheye PRO is the world?s brightest fisheye lens*. The super-large aperture ensures photographers top-notch optical performance in any conditions, especially in low light. The 2.5-cm minimum focusing distance (measured from end of the lens) and maximum magnification of x0.2 make it a logical choice for nature photographers with a passion for quirky perspectives and eye-catching bokeh.

But the Fisheye PRO is also ideal for fast-action sports photography; landscape, nightscape and sky panoramas; as well as crowds, interiors or architecture. For underwater specialists, it likewise opens up exciting new opportunities ? it?s compatible with a range of accessories via the new underwater lens port PPO-EP02.

Like the other lenses in the M.ZUIKO PRO family, it?s extremely compact and lightweight, especially compared to equivalent D-SLR rivals. The build quality is top notch. In pre-launch tests, professional photographers were quick to praise the blur-free performance of the Fisheye PRO at both ends of the f stop scale. Light fall-off at the edges is negligible, as are both chromatic and comatic aberrations, particularly when compared to equivalent rival lenses.

7-14/2.8:
EZ-M0714_pro_black__Product_090.jpg


EZ-M0714_pro_black__ProductAdd_003.jpg


8/1.8 Fisheye:
EW-M0818_black__Product_090.jpg


EF-M0818_pro_black__Product_092.jpg


That's a lot of tiny pieces of glass :blink:
 

eizbaer

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:drool:
that titanium finish looks awesome. i never much liked all the silver versions and the black is just, well, black.
those lenses though, mhmm... just like i'd love to have the 40-150/2.8, i'd now love to get my hands on that 7-14 ... i just don't want to pay for it :(
the fisheye 1.8 i don't quite get... i mean, what's the point of having such a ridiculously bright fisheye? can you even use an aperture like that in a fisheye?
 
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killpanda

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Low light shooting with such a short focal length, fast aperture and 5-axis IBIS should be quite interesting.

Also, taking photos of stars should be easier too.

The 7-14 is tempting too for the same reasons, although it's 200g heavier than the Pany 7-14. The Pany has been pretty much welded to my E-M5 since I got it.


The E-M5.II Ti looks good. Too bad they only make 7000 of it...
 
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