Birds & Wildlife

IceBone

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Is that dark halo in the bokeh around a sharp object a lens "feature" or is it your PP?
 

IceBone

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Read my post again what I'm describing. Don't make me break out photoshop!
 

evoWALO

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Read my post again what I'm describing. Don't make me break out photoshop!

photoshiop it. ;) cause I answered it as out of focused wooden plant. i was shooting at f/5.6 between 6-6.5 meters away so depth of field would be below 2cm.

the bird photo is framed as is. so rule of thirds is followed. i noticed the wooden planks and thought it would serve as a good contrast to the rather dark bird and make the animal pop out.
 
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evoWALO

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I think PP on the first and i looked at the 2nd using hot/cold indicator and it didnt show. image too sharp causing a black line to show more prominently?
 
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evoWALO

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Spotted Dove (Streptopelia chinensis) by alabang, on Flickr

Photographed this free bird at Visayas State University, Philippines

The Spotted Dove (Streptopelia chinensis), also known as the Spotted Turtle Dove, is a pigeon which is a resident breeding bird in tropical southern Asia from Pakistan, India and Sri Lanka east to south China and Southeast Asia. It is also known as the Chinese Dove, Mountain Dove, or Lace-necked Dove.

It is a common and widespread species in open woodland, farmland and habitation over a good deal of its natural range, and this successful bird has also been introduced to the U.S. to Hawaii and Southern California. Other countries it has been introduced to include Singapore, the Philippines, northern Indonesia, Australia and New Zealand. In Australia, it was introduced in Melbourne in the 1860s and has since spread, often replacing native doves. In Australia, they are now found in streets, parks, gardens, agricultural areas and tropical scrubs, from Hobart, Tasmania, to Cooktown, Queensland, to Port Lincoln, South Australia. They can also be seen in Perth, Pemberton, Kalgoorlie and Esperance, in Western Australia. The species' range is expanding.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spotted_Dove
 

leadfoot13

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A couple pics from a day trip to the a bird sanctuary in the marshlands of the SF Bay Area. All criticisms can be explained by the fact it is a Panasonic DMC-FZ18. Zoom levels are 504, 317, 504, and 504mm respectively




 
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evoWALO

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Wonderful shot leadfoot


Black Bittern (Ixobrychus flavicollis) by alabang, on Flickr

The Black Bittern, Ixobrychus flavicollis, is a bittern of Old World origin, breeding in tropical Asia from Pakistan, India and Sri Lanka east to China, Indonesia and Australia. It is mainly resident, but some northern birds migrate short distances.

This is a fairly large species at 58 cm in length, with a longish neck and long yellow bill. The adult is uniformly black above, with yellow neck sides. It is whitish below, heavily streaked with brown. The juvenile is like the adult, but dark brown rather than black.

Their breeding habitat is reedbeds. They nest on platforms of reeds in shrubs, or sometimes in trees. 3-5 eggs are laid. They can be difficult to see, given their skulking lifestyle and reedbed habitat, but tend to fly fairly frequently, when the all black upperparts makes them unmistakable.

Black Bitterns feed on insects, fish and amphibians.

Source: Black Bittern - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Photographed in Candaba, Pampanga


Philippine Duck (Anas luzonica) by alabang, on Flickr

The Philippine Duck (Anas luzonica) is a large dabbling duck of the genus Anas. Fewer than 10,000 remain.

It has a black crown, nape and eye stripe, with a cinnamon head and neck. Rest of body is greyish brown with a bright green speculum. Its legs are greyish brown, and its bill is blue grey.

It eats shrimp, fish, insects, and vegetation, and it frequents all types of wetlands.

Photographed in Candaba, Pampanga, Philippines

Source: Philippine Duck - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Purple Heron (Ardea purpurea) by alabang, on Flickr

The Purple Heron (Ardea purpurea) is a wading bird in the heron family Ardeidae, breeding in Africa, central and southern Europe, and southern and eastern Asia. The European populations are migratory, wintering in tropical Africa; the more northerly Asian populations also migrate further south within Asia. It is a rare but regular wanderer north of its breeding range.

Photographed in Candaba, Pampanga

Read more: Purple Heron - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Grey Heron (Ardea cinerea) by alabang, on Flickr

The Grey Heron (Ardea cinerea), is a wading bird of the heron family Ardeidae, native throughout temperate Europe and Asia and also parts of Africa. It is resident in the milder south and west, but many birds retreat in winter from the ice in colder regions. It has become common in summer even inside the Arctic circle along the Norwegian coast.

Photographed in Candaba, Pampanga, Philippines

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grey_Heron


Philippine Serpent Eagle (Spilornis holospilus) by alabang, on Flickr

The Philippine Serpent Eagle, Spilornis holospilus, is an eagle found in the major islands of the Philippines. It is sometimes treated as a race of the Crested Serpent Eagle (Spilornis cheela). This species is usually found in forest clearings, open woodlands, and sometimes in cultivated lands with scattered trees.

Source: Philippine Serpent-Eagle - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Black-headed Munia (Lonchura atricapilla) by alabang, on Flickr

The Black-headed Munia, Lonchura atricapilla (formerly considered as a subspecies of the Tricoloured Munia Lonchura malacca atricapilla) also known as Chestnut Munia, is a small passerine bird. This estrildid finch is a resident breeding bird in Bangladesh, Brunei, Cambodia, China, India, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Burma, Nepal, Philippines, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, & Vietnam. Known as maya pula ("red maya", to distinguish it from the predominantly brownish Tree Sparrow which is also called maya) in the Philippines, this bird was the former national bird of the Philippines (the Philippine national bird is now the Philippine eagle)

Source: Black-headed Munia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Lowland White-eye (Zosterops meyeni) by alabang, on Flickr

Photographed in La Mesa Eco Park

The Lowland White-eye (Zosterops meyeni) is a species of bird in the Zosteropidae family.

It is endemic to the Philippines.

Its natural habitat is subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests.

Source: Lowland White-eye - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Spotted Dove (Streptopelia chinensis) by alabang, on Flickr

Photographed this free bird at Visayas State University, Philippines

The Spotted Dove (Streptopelia chinensis), also known as the Spotted Turtle Dove, is a pigeon which is a resident breeding bird in tropical southern Asia from Pakistan, India and Sri Lanka east to south China and Southeast Asia. It is also known as the Chinese Dove, Mountain Dove, or Lace-necked Dove.

It is a common and widespread species in open woodland, farmland and habitation over a good deal of its natural range, and this successful bird has also been introduced to the U.S. to Hawaii and Southern California. Other countries it has been introduced to include Singapore, the Philippines, northern Indonesia, Australia and New Zealand. In Australia, it was introduced in Melbourne in the 1860s and has since spread, often replacing native doves. In Australia, they are now found in streets, parks, gardens, agricultural areas and tropical scrubs, from Hobart, Tasmania, to Cooktown, Queensland, to Port Lincoln, South Australia. They can also be seen in Perth, Pemberton, Kalgoorlie and Esperance, in Western Australia. The species' range is expanding.

Source: Spotted Dove - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

Labcoatguy

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Co-linear mallard ducks.



Shot with a Sunset 100mm lens at f5.6; it's worth going for the full-sized image to see just how hard that duck fails in walking on ice. I've decided to title it "Schadenfreuduck".
 
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evoWALO

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Common Emerald Dove (Chalcophaps indica) by alabang, on Flickr

The Common Emerald Dove (Chalcophaps indica) is a pigeon which is a widespread resident breeding bird in the tropical and sub-tropical parts of the Indian Subcontinent and east through Myanmar, Thailand, Malaysia and Indonesia, to northern and eastern Australia. The dove is also known by the names of Green Dove and Green-winged pigeon. The Common Emerald Dove is the state bird of the Indian State of Tamil Nadu

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Common_Emerald_Dove

Location: Quezon City, Philippines
 

evoWALO

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evoWALO

Well-Known Member
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Location
Philippines / Naples, Florida

evoWALO

Well-Known Member
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Location
Philippines / Naples, Florida

evoWALO

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Wandering Whistling Duck (Dendrocygna arcuata) by alabang, on Flickr

Formerly named Tree Ducks, the Wandering Whistling Duck have their new name because of their loud whistling calls and the whistling noise their wings make during flight.

They have long necks and legs and look like a cross between a goose and a duck. They have a strong head and neck with a darker crown and hindneck. The breast contains black spotting and the feathers are mostly dark brown.

They range in size from 54?60 cm in height and weigh on average 750 grams. They mainly feed on grasses, waterlillies, water plants and occasionally insects and aquatic vertebrae.

Habitat

The Wandering Whistling Duck lives in deep lagoons, flooded grasslands or dams. They enjoy the water and rarely leave the shore.

They can swim and dive with ease.

Breeding

Breeding occurs during the tropical wet season usually between December and May. During this time six to fifteen eggs are laid in a nest not far from water and usually in high grass or a sheltered area.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wandering_Whistling_Duck

Photographed in Barangay Marasbaras, Tacloban City, Eastern Visayas, Philippines
 
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