Covid 19 CRISIS

Blind_Io

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If that private school uses vouchers or takes any federal or state money - you bet your ass they can be told what to do.
 

GRtak

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https://www.npr.org/sections/health...-some-states-lose-access-to-covid-hospital-da

With CDC Sidelined, Some States Lose Access To Timely COVID-19 Hospital Data

Just as the number of people hospitalized for COVID-19 approaches new highs in some parts of the country, hospital data in Kansas and Missouri is suddenly incomplete or missing.

The Missouri Hospital Association reports that it no longer has access to the data it uses to guide statewide coronavirus planning, and the Kansas Hospital Association says its hospital data reports may be delayed.

Earlier this week, the Trump administration directed hospitals to change how they report data to the federal government and how that data will be made available.


https://www.npr.org/sections/corona...ld-sets-daily-record-in-new-coronavirus-cases

World Sets Daily Record In New Coronavirus Cases
 
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jack_christie

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Dr_Grip

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So we have some top level data on a potential covid treatment.

And on top of it comes very encouraging data from Pfizer and some "not great not terrible" data from AstraZeneca on their vaccine efforts. We will science the shit out of this covid fucker.
 

jack_christie

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Dr_Grip

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There's a lot of back-and-forth between people who understand immunology (i.e. "not me") about whether the Oxford, Pfizer, or CanSino data released yesterday is the most promising, especially regarding T-Cell count. CanSino (and to a certain extend Moderna, on grounds of the safety profile and T-cell response) are seen as the potential duds currently, but since Phase 3 trials are being run in places where the virus is out of control (Brasil, USA) we probably will know more about this before the summer's over.

By the way, to venture into politics for a second - I belive that Boris Johnson's "back to normal by Christmas" speech late last week would have gone down a lot better if the Oxford vaccine data would have already been available - since the British Press has been speculating a lot about the imminent data release all of last week, he obviously misjudged The Lancet's timing (or The Lancet's editorial board decided not to be part of a political spin).
 

jack_christie

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There's a lot of back-and-forth between people who understand immunology (i.e. "not me") about whether the Oxford, Pfizer, or CanSino data released yesterday is the most promising, especially regarding T-Cell count. CanSino (and to a certain extend Moderna, on grounds of the safety profile and T-cell response) are seen as the potential duds currently, but since Phase 3 trials are being run in places where the virus is out of control (Brasil, USA) we probably will know more about this before the summer's over.

By the way, to venture into politics for a second - I belive that Boris Johnson's "back to normal by Christmas" speech late last week would have gone down a lot better if the Oxford vaccine data would have already been available - since the British Press has been speculating a lot about the imminent data release all of last week, he obviously misjudged The Lancet's timing (or The Lancet's editorial board decided not to be part of a political spin).


Kate Bingham, chair of the UK government’s vaccines taskforce

In another interview she said best case senario is vaccine available a end of year



UK targets up to 12 Covid-19 vaccines from around the world
Head of the government’s vaccines taskforce reveals strategy aimed at ‘exploring the landscape’ and hedging bets
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/jul/21/uk-targets-12-covid-19-vaccines-from-around-the-world



Vaccine role out typically takes four years
 
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ahpadt

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Vaccine role out typically takes four years

We are not in typical times so I hope that whenever a good candidate is ready, a mountain of effort is put into making billions of the damned things. I can't take being in this state for much more than 6 months.
 

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Lots of resources are being thrown onto vaccine development right now, but medical testing cannot be sped up indefinitely. With such an accelerated process, obviously there cannot be any research into long-term effects. And we're talking about a vaccine that should be given to basically every human being on this planet, or a large enough percentage to justify that slight exaggeration anyway.
I'm not saying I won't jump at the first opportunity to get vaccinated on this one, but this is something worth considering.
 

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Lots of resources are being thrown onto vaccine development right now, but medical testing cannot be sped up indefinitely. With such an accelerated process, obviously there cannot be any research into long-term effects. And we're talking about a vaccine that should be given to basically every human being on this planet, or a large enough percentage to justify that slight exaggeration anyway.
I'm not saying I won't jump at the first opportunity to get vaccinated on this one, but this is something worth considering.

Yup, we need to be careful with this. I don't want to trust a solely American backed company or funded system during this time because I am concerned it will be "this works!" "What are the side effects?" "Don't know, don't care, we're free again!" I don't trust that something half assed will come out from the US and be completely safe. It'll be rushed to market, cost a bunch, and kill you in 10 years.
 

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I do not think there is any documented case of a vaccine "killing you in ten years" as @93Flareside points out. And especially with personal injury lawyers hell-bent on class action lawsuits I am pretty sure Pfizer & Co will make sure nothing they put out will do any harm. Also, luckily if you distrust the US, it's actually the Brits (Oxford with support from AstroZeneca) and the Germans (BioNTech funded by Pfizer) being in the lead.

As @DanRoM says, we should not cut too many corners, but a 30K participant Phase 3 study running for at least a quarter does not look like too much corner-cutting to me.
Yes, we won't have longer-term data available just yet, but even six months of protection right now sound a lot better than "no".

Logistics, I think, will be the bigger challenge come 2021...
 

Dr_Grip

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Vaccine role out typically takes four years
In this video you can clearly see the difference between the US and Europe. For US media talking heads it's about getting people to wear masks and stop the spread instead of thinking a vaccine will magically solve everything.

In the EU, we have to fight little outbreaks here, there, everywhere, but all in all we are in a mask-wearing, socially-distanced version of "normalcy". I have not read anything about it, but for someone who took statistics years ago in college it seems like with tens of covid cases per 100.000 people a lower-effectivity vaccine (what does that even mean? One that does not work in all people? One that does not prevent infection, but only serious sickness?) would actually get us out of the mess easier than in a scenario with hundreds of cases per 100.000.

EDIT: Learned something new from the Guardian article above - the adenovirus platform now has an approved Ebola vaccine under it's belt, so we can basically assume that the safety profile for the covid vaccine will be within the same corridor. So, on to effectivtiy.
 
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93Flareside

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I do not think there is any documented case of a vaccine "killing you in ten years" as @93Flareside points out. And especially with personal injury lawyers hell-bent on class action lawsuits I am pretty sure Pfizer & Co will make sure nothing they put out will do any harm. Also, luckily if you distrust the US, it's actually the Brits (Oxford with support from AstroZeneca) and the Germans (BioNTech funded by Pfizer) being in the lead.


I am glad to see in this era we’re going through that the US isn’t leading it. I’m more worried the spotlight would either get stolen or magically this becomes a US thought of it first thing. The UK and Germany look to be doing well with this. We’re all rushing to find an answer that while this is important, needs to be looked at with a clear mind.
 

CraigB

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Missouri is in a bad place. (Appointed) Governor Parsons said some very strange things about the opening of schools in the last few days:

"These kids have got to get back to school," Governor Parson said Friday. "They are at the lowest risk possible. And if they do get COVID-19, which they will—and they will when they go to school—they're not going to the hospitals. They're not going to have to sit in doctor's offices. They're going to go home and they're going to get over it."

"We have got to move on," Parson continued. "We can't just let this thing stop us in our tracks."

https://www.newsweek.com/missouri-g...-get-over-it-amid-push-reopen-schools-1519176


Meanwhile yesterday we hit the 1250+ cases in a day milestone. (Graphics via Matthew Holloway on Facebook)

110085873_10101948327862762_4572224924514523462_o.jpg

110317104_10101948327832822_7947348425802592036_o.jpg


110123272_10101948327882722_8214676353998962029_o.jpg


I think the above chart says quite a bit. This is far from under control in this state. It's not out of control, but it's not far from it. Sending kids to school to pick it up and bring it home is the worst idea possible. Thanks Parson.
 

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"These kids have got to get back to school," Governor Parson said Friday. "They are at the lowest risk possible. And if they do get COVID-19, which they will—and they will when they go to school—they're not going to the hospitals. They're not going to have to sit in doctor's offices. They're going to go home and they're going to get over it."

"We have got to move on," Parson continued. "We can't just let this thing stop us in our tracks."


https://www.newsweek.com/missouri-g...-get-over-it-amid-push-reopen-schools-1519176

Sending kids to school to pick it up and bring it home is the worst idea possible. Thanks Parson.

There is no Trump plan other than to make it worse by relying on Republican idiots.
 
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