Dual exhausts? everywhere, but not on the right cars

thevictor390

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Yeah, yeah, he only removed one of the pipes :p
 

argatoga

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If you'd weld metal bars between rollbar and windshield fame, it would get probably over triple as stiff as it's now. And from structural point of view, you'd get the same rigidity as in the couple :)

800px-1977.triumph.stag.blue.arp.jpg


:p
 

Chaos

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I think we have a member here who did an exhaust delete on his S2000 :D

Yeah, Chilicoke I think it was. He has an awesome looking S2k though.
 

Lastsoul

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Did they realize it's not going to stay in one piece without adding that part to the roof? :) Actually, what's that type of car called then. It's not proper cabriolet, but is it a targa? Or a T-top with removable rear window :p
 

argatoga

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What about removable roof coupes?
 

Labcoatguy

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The Elise has fairly high door sills for a road car, which do much to add to stiffness. A wide central tunnel can also help, as in the case of the Mk2 MR2 with T-tops. You can get a quick if not particularly rigorous idea of how stiff a car is by looking at it with the doors open and seeing how high up the structural bits go above the floorpan; the higher the better.
 

argatoga

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Found this related article on one of my favorite auto sites:

http://ateupwithmotor.com/automotive-terms/122-what-is-a-coupe.html

What is a coupe?
Written by Aaron Severson
Tuesday, 16 September 2008 17:06
Some of you may be waiting for part two of our article on power and torque, but in the meantime, let's examine another frequently confused automotive term: the word coupe.

The term coupe (or coup?) is derived from the French couper, "to cut." In the era of horse-drawn carriages, it originally applied to a shortened (hence "cut") carriage with space for only one row of seats inside.

In styling usage, the term coupe refers to a close-coupled automobile. Couple distance is the distance between the driver's hip joint when seated (which stylists call the "H-point") and the rear axle. (The term can alternately refer to the distance between the driver's "H-point" and the H-point of the rear-seat passenger.) A "close-coupled" car, therefore, is one where the front seats are relatively close to the rear wheels, which naturally leaves little or no space for rear-seat passengers.

Coupes are usually two-door cars, largely because the close-coupled dimensions don't leave room for a rear door of reasonable size, but there are four-door coupes, as well. Many manufacturers, however, apply the "coupe" label only to two-door bodies.

In prewar days, there were several varieties of coupe:
A business coupe was a fixed-roof car with an integral trunk, but no rear seats. As the name suggests, it was aimed at traveling salesmen, who needed to carry samples, but not passengers.
A sport coupe was similar to a business coupe, but instead of an integral trunk, it had a rumble seat (a dickey seat, in British parlance) in the rear deck for two occasional passengers.
An opera coupe had a rear compartment with fold-down seats for occasional passengers (as the name implied, in case the well-heeled buyer needed to take extra guests to the opera).
A club coupe was a two-door body with two rows of seats.
Business coupes continued into the 1950s, as did club coupes (not always by that name), but the opera coupe disappeared after World War Two. The rumble seat vanished from most cars after about 1940, although U.S. automakers recycled the term "sport coupe" to refer to the pillarless hardtops that became popular in the 1950s.


No one would call a 1949 Cadillac small, or even close-coupled, but Cadillac described the two-door fastback as a club coupe.

Technically, a coupe does not have to be a closed-roof car. Particularly before World War Two, close-coupled open cars were often described as convertible coupes (or, in British usage, drop-head coup?s) -- in part because many automakers offered convertible sedans, as well. Since the 1950s, the term has primarily been applied to fixed-roof cars.

In the U.S., the Society of American Engineers (SAE) standards (which are used by the Environmental Protection Agency and National Highway Transportation Safety Administration) distinguish coupes from sedans based on rear-seat volume, not the number of doors or the couple distance. The cutoff is 33 cubic feet (934 liters); cars with more back-seat volume than that are technically considered sedans, whether they have two doors or four. (Thus, the four-door Mazda RX-8 is a coupe, while Cadillac's Coupe De Ville was not.)

In common usage, though, most people now use the term to refer to any closed, two-door car. Inevitably, common usage trumps technical correctness, so within the next decade or two, the original significance of the term will have faded into history.
 

TheCleaner

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wow, this topic went right off.. I was just going to chip in with Merc and the clk55 amg, which, for something with a 5.4l V8, only got a single side.

benz-clk55-rear.jpg
 

GRtak

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mooglebunny

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Whenever I see a newer Accord with two pipes it makes me wonder sometimes.

Also I once saw one of the newer (2009 or 2010) Foresters with dual exhaust pipes. It wasn't a turbo, either. I was a little confused.

Also I really should get a picture, but my neighbor has a relatively newer Jeep Compass (I believe) and it has two exhausts. The more confusing part is that it has some other smaller pipes (they look like mini exhaust pipes) closer to the rear tires and it looks quite odd. I'll have to get a picture of it one of these days when I outside to explain what I mean.
 

prizrak

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Whenever I see a newer Accord with two pipes it makes me wonder sometimes.
They have V6 Accords.
Also I once saw one of the newer (2009 or 2010) Foresters with dual exhaust pipes. It wasn't a turbo, either. I was a little confused.
They have flat "boxer" motors so it actually makes perfect sense.
 

jsausley

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Lol. Forgot about it, been busy with work. I'll get some tomorrow.

http://img163.imageshack.**/img163/1631/unknown1q.jpg

http://img191.imageshack.**/img191/9711/unknownyh.jpg

This is relevant to the thread because it has dual exhaust.
 

jsausley

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Eh, my dad used to own a nearly identical C4 ZR1 in the late 90's. I grew up with this style, and this one has 8,000 miles. It has character, and I have history with it. The C6 is a much better car in every measurable way but I like this one better. :p
 

JCE

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To get this back ON TOPIC. I've often wondered about putting dual exhaust on the SVT, but, that would only be cosmetic really. I do like cars with dual exhaust outlets--aka one or two on each side. I do not like high powered cars or even sports cars to have the exhaust coming out of just 1 side out back. Just looks non-symmetrical.


I find that list a bit meh and full of bullshit. No way an SVT Focus should be rated lower than an SVT Contour. Also, a Dodge Caliber or Scion xB not eligible? WTF? They are just another econobox like the Fiesta and Neon. Good or bad as they may be they still should be on that list under H. I won't even comment on anything else to waste my time. *grumble*
 

mooglebunny

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They have V6 Accords.

They have flat "boxer" motors so it actually makes perfect sense.

I understand that there are V6 accords (pretty popular option around here), but there are other V6 engines out there that don't have dual exhausts.

What I thought was interesting is that my roommate's 1996 V6 Camry has two exhausts, but my Grandmother's 2005 Sienna V6 only has one.

Right, but a majority of Foresters (especially before the 3rd gen) only have a single exhaust. Grandmother's only has one and boyfriend's only has one. Turbos all have two. Neighbor's 2009 Impreza has one. If I remember right, that Forester was from another state (Oregon, maybe?) and I'm thinking it may have had something to do with emissions standards elsewhere?
 

jasonof2000

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I find that list a bit meh and full of bullshit. No way an SVT Focus should be rated lower than an SVT Contour. Also, a Dodge Caliber or Scion xB not eligible? WTF? They are just another econobox like the Fiesta and Neon. Good or bad as they may be they still should be on that list under H. I won't even comment on anything else to waste my time. *grumble*

When the SVT Focus first came out it was in G-Stock but it was not competitive at all so it was moved back to H-stock. The car handles very well but first and second gears are just too tall, on a tight course the car just does not stand a chance.

The current XB and the Caliber are both top heavy compared to other econoboxes so it makes sense to exclude them.
 
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JCE

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When the SVT Focus first came out it was in G-Stock but it was not competitive at all so it was moved back to H-stock. The car handles very well but first and second gears are just too tall, on a tight course the car just does not stand a chance.

The current XB and the Caliber are both top heavy compared to other econoboxes so it makes sense to exclude them.

Ah ok, thx for the explanation. :D I'm just so irritated at Ford for the shitty gears and ECU tune that's geared for economy even though it has a fucking SVT badge on the bootlid. Oh and I also hate the intake position not being in one of the fenders to avoid heat-soak. Still, I've driven an SVT Contour quite often and it doesn't handle nearly as well. It is more point and shoot than maintain speed through the corner. And I do love CSVT's. But I digress.

I'm done. :)
 
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