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Final Gear Top 100 - 11th place - 9 votes

Overheat

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here's the 4 cars tied in 11th place


Lamborghini Miura

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The Lamborghini Miura is a sports car built in Italy by Lamborghini between 1966 and 1973. A mid-engined layout had been used successfully in competition, including by the Ford GT40 and Ferrari 250 LM at Le Mans. De Tomaso had produced a road car with this layout, the Vallelunga, but otherwise cars designed for the road were almost uniformly front-engined, rear drive vehicles. The Miura was a trendsetter, the one that made the mid-engined layout de rigueur among two-seater high performance supercars.

Inspired by the Ford GT40, the Miura astonished showgoers at the 1965 Turin Motor Show where only the chassis was shown, with multiple orders being placed despite the lack of an actual body. Later, Marcello Gandini from Bertone, who would later go on to design almost all of Lamborghini's cars, was chosen to design the body. Both body and chassis were launched five months later at the 1966 Geneva Motor Show. It was a sensation, with its flamboyant bodywork and unusual engine and front-located trunk access, where 3/4ths of the car would open up to reveal its V12 engine.

Early Miuras, known internally as P400s, were powered by a 3.9 L V12 engine mounted transversely and producing 350 hp (260 kW). 275 P400s were produced between 1966 and 1969, a success for Lamborghini despite its then-steep $20,000 USD price (approx. $114,000 in today's terms).

The P400S Miura, also known as the Miura S, made its introduction at the Turin Motorshow in Novermber 1968, where the original chassis was introduced 3 years earlier. It was slightly revised from the P400 with its newly added power windows, bright chrome trim around external windows, new overhead inline console with new rocker switches, minor revision engine internals, notched trunk end panels(allowing for slightly more luggage space). Engine changes were good for an additional 20bhp. Other revisions were limited to creature comforts, such as glove box door, reversed position of cigarette lighter and windshield wiper switch and single release handles for front and rear body sections. 338 P400S Miuras were produced between Dec 1968 and March 1971.

The last and most famous Miura, the P400SV or Miura SV featured different cam timing, bigger valves and altered carbs, which increased fuel consumption so much that the factory offered a larger 110 litre fuel tank as an option. These gave the engine an additional 15 bhp, to 385. The SV can be distinguished from its predecessors from its lack of "eyebrows" over the headlights and wider fenders to accommodate the new 9-inch wheels and Pirelli Cinturato tires. 150 SVs were produced, including one that was owned by Frank Sinatra.


Porsche Carrera GT

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Porsche began developing the car in 2000 as a succesor to the 911 GT1 car they had discontinued in late 1998, but the project was abandoned. Porsche maintained that the vehicle was dropped because of FIA rule changes, although speculation has indicated that Porsche discontinued development at the behest of VW/Audi chairman Ferdinand Pi?ch; Piech was reportedly concerned over the prospect of a Porsche vehicle competing against the Audi R8 race car, which had just been introduced. As a member of the Porsche family, Piech holds a seat on the company's board of directors and owns a percentage of the firm, so his influence could be exacted from inside. In addition, Porsche needed to free up capital and manpower for development work on the Cayenne, and dropping development of the race car made it possible.

Porsche did however produce one unit, and showed it at the 2000 Geneva Motor Show, mainly in an attempt to draw attention to their display. Surprising interest in the vehicle and an influx of revenue being provided by the Cayenne helped Porsche decide to make use of the car, and development started on a road-legal version that would be produced in small numbers at Porsche's new manufacturing facility in Leipzig. Porsche started a production run of Carrera GTs in 2004, shipping the units with an MSRP of $440,000 USD. Originally, a production run of 1,500 cars was slated, But Porsche announced in August, 2005 that it would not continue production of the Carrera GT into 2006, reducing the total production estimate to 1,250 units. 340 Carrera GTs were sold in the United States in 2005.

The Carrera GT is powered by an all-new 5.7 litre V10 engine producing 605 SAE horsepower (451 kW). Porsche claims it will accelerate from 0 to 100 km/h (62 mph) in 3.9 seconds and has a maximum speed of 332 km/h (204 mph), although road tests indicated that in actuality the car could acclerate from 0-60 in under 3.5 seconds and has a top speed of 335-340km/h. A six-speed manual transmission is the only available transmission, in contrast to its rival the Ferrari Enzo which is only offered with sequential manual transmission. Also the Carrera GT is significantly less expensive than the Ferrari Enzo. The Ferrari Enzo is priced around $660,000 to the Carrera GT's $440,000.

Technology of note includes a pure Carbon fiber monocoque and subframe, dry-sump lubrication and inboard suspension. The main innovation on this vehicle however is the use of a ceramic clutch. This is the first appearance of this race car technology in a road car. The clutch although difficult to master allows the engine to sit lower in the chassis than in any other super car, both improving its aerodynamics and lowering its center of gravity.

Despite a seemingly difficult clutch, Porsche incorporated computer management of the clutch when the car is on an incline. Drivers are able to lift completely off the clutch and not stall the car.

Unlike its rivals the Carrera GT eschews cutting edge driving aids such as dynamic stability control. Instead Porsche engineers have placed their faith in a communicative chassis and the ability of the driver.


Enzo Ferrari

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The Enzo Ferrari is a 12-cylinder Ferrari supercar named after the company's founder, Enzo Ferrari. It was built in 2003 using Formula One technology, such as a carbon-fiber body, F1-style sequential shift transmission, and carbon-ceramic brake discs. Also used are technologies not allowed in F1 such as active aerodynamics. After a maximum downforce of 1709 pounds is reached at 186 mph (301 km/h) the rear spoiler is actuated by computer to maintain that downforce.

The Enzo's V12 engine is the first of a new generation for Ferrari. It is based on the architecture of the V8 found in sister-company Maserati's Quattroporte, using the same basic architecture and 104 mm bore spacing. This design will replace the former architectures seen in V12 and V8 engines used in most other contemporary Ferraris. The 2005 F430 is the second Ferrari to get a version of this new powerplant.

The Enzo was intended as a street-legal racecar and as the sum of Ferrari's technological heritage; it was to date the fastest road car Ferrari had ever produced. The Enzo is the base platform for the Maserati MC12, which is both sold as a street car and GT racing car.

The Enzo was initially announced with a limited production run of 349 units. The company sent invitations to existing customers, and all 349 cars were sold in this way before production began. Later, after numerous requests, Ferrari decided to build 50 more Enzos, bringing the total to 399.

In March 2005, Ferrari announced that it would build one additional Enzo, bringing the total to 400. The car was ceremonially presented to Pope John Paul II on January 17, 2005, with the Pope then requesting that the car be auctioned off to benefit the Caritas charity. This car was auctioned by Sotheby's on June 28, 2005 to benefit survivors of the 2004 Tsunami. The car, chassis number 141920, sold for 1,055,000 euros (1,275,000 US dollars).

Three prototype "mules" were built, M1, M2, and M3. Each was bodied to look like a 348, even though the mules were built in 2000. The third mule was offered for auction alongside the 400th Enzo in June, 2005, bringing 195,500 euros (236,300 US dollars).

As a result of the Enzo, Ferrari have decided to use some of the technology developed for it in a small-scale program to get more feedback from certain customers for use in future car design as well as their racing program. The core of this program is a car called the Ferrari FXX. It is loosely based on the Enzo's design with a highly-tuned 6.2 liter version of the Enzo's engine putting out roughly 800 PS (789 hp/588 kW). The gearbox is new as well as the tires (custom-designed for this car by Bridgestone) and the brakes (developed by Brembo). In addition, the car is fitted with extensive data-recording and telemetry systems to allow Ferrari to record the car's behavior.


Ferrari F430

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The Ferrari F430 is the replacement for the Ferrari 360. It debuted at the September, 2004 Paris Motor Show. European left-hand drive sales began in November, 2004, but right-hand drive sales did not start until Spring 2005, and the United States did not get the F430 until the Summer of 2005.

The F430's chassis is heavily based on its predecessor, the 360. Internally, both cars are referred to with the same number (131), though the F430 has the Evoluzione tag attached to show that it features some major changes. Internally, the car is simply known as the "Evo".

The body has been redesigned to be more curvaceous and aerodynamic. Although the drag coefficient remains the same, downforce has been greatly enhanced. A great deal of Ferrari heritage is found in the car: At the rear, the Enzo's tail lights have been added, and the interior vents of the Enzo are also present. The car's name has been etched into the outside of the Testarossa-styled driver's side mirror as was previously done with the F40. The large oval openings in the front bumper are remeniscent of Ferrari racing models from the 1960s, specifically the "sharknose" Formula One and 250 TR61 Le Mans cars of Phil Hill.

Along with a restyled body, the F430 features a 4.3 L V8 engine derived from a shared Ferrari/Maserati design. This new powerplant is a significant departure for the F430's line: The engines of all previous V8 Ferraris were descendents of the "Dino" racing program of the 1950s. This 50 year development cycle comes to an end with the entirely new 4.3 L, the architecture of which will later replace the Dino-derived V12 in most other Ferrari cars. Power is 360.4 kW (483 hp) at 8500 rpm and torque 465 N?m (343 ft?lbf) at 5250 rpm.

Other notable features include the first application of Ferrari's manettino steering wheel-mounted control knob. Drivers can select from five different settings which modify the vehicle's ESP system, "Skyhook" electronic suspension, transmission behavior, throttle response, and active "E-Diff" differential. The feature is similar to Land Rover's "Terrain Response" system.

The brakes on the F430 were made in close collaboration with Brembo. The result has been a new cast-iron alloy for the discs. The new alloy includes molybdenum which has better heat dissipation performance. Another option Ferrari is providing are carbon-ceramic discs. Ceramics have much higher heat-resistivity than metals, thus giving the F430's brakes not only good performance but also a longer lifespan. Ferrari claims the brakes will not fade even after 300-350 laps at their test track.

The E-Diff is another important addition. It is a computer-controlled limited slip differential which can vary the distribution of torque based on inputs such as steering angle and lateral acceleration.

Car and Driver found the car's performance worthy of the Ferrari heritage, and recorded a 3.5 sec 0-60 mph acceleration run in the F430. This makes it the second-quickest Ferrari road car ever made, after the Enzo. That being said, the 3.5 second 0-60 run was made on a European spec car, which has launch control, a feature designed to help launch the car from a standing start at high RPM's. Much like the E-Diff and the manettino, the launch control is a technology borrowed from Ferrari's legendary Formula 1 racing program. The launch control is unavailable in U.S.-spec F430's, presumably due to liability issues.

When Car and Driver tested a U.S.-spec F430, they recorded a 0-60 time of 4 seconds- a figure still worthy of the Ferrari name.
 
Great - that keeps my two guesses for the No.1 car untouched - I'm not surprised to only find supercars in these positions, I'm especially glad to see that the fans of the E-Type seem to outnumber the Miura protagonists on this forum :)
 
mautzel said:
Great - that keeps my two guesses for the No.1 car untouched - I'm not surprised to only find supercars in these positions, I'm especially glad to see that the fans of the E-Type seem to outnumber the Miura protagonists on this forum :)

Ah, but bear in mind the number of Americans on the forum.

No doubt the Corvette is going to walk away with it :p

Gutted I registered after the votes went in, then the Fiat Multipla would have got one vote, at least.

Cars I'd consider to be great are starting to drop like flies now...wonder what the last few remaining are?
 
teeb said:
mautzel said:
Great - that keeps my two guesses for the No.1 car untouched - I'm not surprised to only find supercars in these positions, I'm especially glad to see that the fans of the E-Type seem to outnumber the Miura protagonists on this forum :)

Ah, but bear in mind the number of Americans on the forum.

No doubt the Corvette is going to walk away with it :p

Everybody was saying that of the Ford GT / GT40 as well, I have to admit that I forgot the Corvette but don't think it'll be voted No.1.
 
mautzel said:
Everybody was saying that of the Ford GT / GT40 as well, I have to admit that I forgot the Corvette but don't think it'll be voted No.1.

If the Vette is voted No. 1, I'll name my child "Jeremy Clarkson II" So that when JC I passes away, my son can carry on the crusade of trying to knock sense into stupid people.
 
Interesting to see the CGT and Enzo on the same level. :)
 
teeb said:
Gutted I registered after the votes went in, then the Fiat Multipla would have got one vote, at least.

IIRC it already got 1 vote, not entirely sure though
 
Ah... Miura, Carrera, 430... 3 of my votes. I regret the last one now, though. Could have come up with something better really.
 
There goes my Muira vote. The Audi ur-Quattro has yet to show up though! I'm pleasantly surprised by that.
 
Labcoatguy said:
There goes my Muira vote. The Audi ur-Quattro has yet to show up though! I'm pleasantly surprised by that.
yep, and so didnt the mclaren f1 or Porsche 911 :)
 
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