GM investing $890M in next-gen small block V8s

jetsetter

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Ah yes, the classic small block Chevy. No other engine in history carries as much nostalgia and General Motors looks poised to push its mouse motor well into the future by adding new technologies designed to clean up the mill's emissions and improve fuel mileage. Expect these engines to show up in applications from sportscars like the Camaro and Corvette to pickup trucks and SUVs.

According to GM, all of its next-generation small block V8s will use aluminum engine blocks in addition to being E85 compatible. We can also expect to see direct injection added to the small block's repertoire for improved efficiency and power production. Finally, the combustion chambers will see a redesign that will promote fuel efficiency.

Naturally, an update to an existing engine line requires a suitable investment, and this one is no different. GM will be investing nearly $900 million and will add or retain more than 1,600 jobs in Tonawanda, NY; St. Catherines, Ontario; Defiance, Ohio; Bedford, Indiana and Bay City, Michigan.

GM To Invest $890 Million To Build Cleaner, More Fuel-Efficient Engines

o Five plants receive work: Tonawanda, N.Y.; Defiance, Ohio; Bedford, Ind.; Bay City, Mich. and St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada
o Investment creates or retains about 1,600 jobs
o New engines to save more fuel through direct injection technology and advanced combustion system design

DETROIT ? General Motors will invest more than $890 million which will create or retain more than 1,600 jobs in five North American plants to produce a new generation of fuel efficient small block truck and car engines. The investment consists of the following:

* Two plants will support the engine production:
o Tonawanda, N.Y. ? an investment of $400 million resulting in more than 710 jobs
o St. Catharines, Ontario ? an investment of $235 million resulting in approximately 400 jobs (click here for Canada release)

* Three plants will support engine casting and component production:
o Defiance, Ohio ? an investment of $115 million resulting in up to 189 jobs
o Bedford, Ind. ? an investment of $111 million resulting in about 245 jobs
o Bay City, Mich. ? an investment of $32 million resulting in over 80 jobs

The investments include facility renovation and installation of new, highly flexible engine machining and assembly equipment and special tooling designed for manufacturing efficiency and engine quality. At the casting facilities, investments include expansion of semi-permanent mold and precision sand casting technologies that result in a high degree of dimensional accuracy and material strength properties needed to support the newer, more efficient engines in GM's product portfolio.

"GM is investing in our plants, restoring and creating jobs and making progress toward our vision of designing, building and selling the world's best vehicles," said Mark Reuss, president of GM North America. "These latest investments show our commitment to improving fuel economy for buyers of every GM car, truck and crossover and giving them the best possible driving and ownership experience."

The next generation small block engine family will have unprecedented fuel efficiency through direct injection and an all-new advanced combustion system design. The new engine family will rely exclusively on aluminum engine blocks, which are lighter and contribute to the improved fuel efficiency. In addition to being E85 ethanol capable, these engines are being designed with the capability to meet increasingly stringent criteria emissions standards expected throughout this decade.

Specifics about the engine capabilities as well as product applications will be shared at a later date.


http://www.autoblog.com/2010/04/27/gm-investing-890m-in-next-gen-small-block-v8s/
This is great news. I consider the LS family of V8s to be the best engines for sale today.
 

AiR

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And everyone outside of North America simply ask "what for?" ;)
 

JCE

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This next gen of small block V8's better produce some good amount of power with LESS DISPLACEMENT. I'm growing tired of the increase in displacement just to get more power. Infact they should just create ONE V8 for trucks and its Corvette and start doing more 4, 5 and 6 cylinder engines with forced induction.

And the LSx isn't the best set of engines on sale today, not even close. But I digress.
 

argatoga

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This next gen of small block V8's better produce some good amount of power with LESS DISPLACEMENT. I'm growing tired of the increase in displacement just to get more power. Infact they should just create ONE V8 for trucks and its Corvette and start doing more 4, 5 and 6 cylinder engines with forced induction.
Ugh... why do I need to keep saying this:

DISPLACEMENT DOSEN'T MATTER UNLESS YOU ARE TAXED BY IT.

See my sig for the size difference. See the Corvette fuel economy for the fuel usage.

And no you WANT more displacement for trucks. More displacement means more torque and LESS STRESS on the engine as it won't need to be revved as high.

And the LSx isn't the best set of engines on sale today, not even close. But I digress.
Name some engines with a better power to weight ratio. You won't find many. A lot of those low displacement engines weigh about as much as an LSx. For example the Nissan VG engines (2-3.3L) weigh more than an LSx.

Oh and before I hear "OMG TUBOZ POWE POER LUTZA!!!11"

Turbos add over 100lbs to the engine.
 
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JCE

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Wow, struck a nerve eh? :lol: Chill out dude and don't take it so personally.
 

argatoga

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Wow, struck a nerve eh? :lol: Chill out dude and don't take it so personally.
I don't take it personally. But I like to nip idiotic comments like that in the bud before hearing them for the eighteenth millionth time.

Plus if I just said "Displacement doesn't matter" we would have 10 pages of dribble on the topic.
 
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Cobol74

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Configuration per se is not the issue it is how the engine fits with the roles of the vehicles it powers. I should imagine that there is a need for a V8 in North America, there is very much less of a need for one in Europe, Australia has a need but New Zealand less so I guess. ...
 

tigger

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Wow, struck a nerve eh? :lol: Chill out dude and don't take it so personally.
He is right though, whether or not you want to admit it. The 6.2l, 430hp Vette gets 26mpg under the tough new EPA standard. That's what I average in my 140hp, 2.7l BMW. The LSx engines are brilliant in general. For their weight, size, output and reliability I don't think they have a match. Anyway, I think it's a great idea for GM to get to work on the next-gen V8.
 

MattD1zzl3

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Just make sure its still a standard valvetrain design and i'll be pleased.
 

jetsetter

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He is right though, whether or not you want to admit it. The 6.2l, 430hp Vette gets 26mpg under the tough new EPA standard. That's what I average in my 140hp, 2.7l BMW. The LSx engines are brilliant in general. For their weight, size, output and reliability I don't think they have a match. Anyway, I think it's a great idea for GM to get to work on the next-gen V8.
One must also factor in the cost of the engine itself and the cost of repair. The engines are fairly cheap to produce and their price reflects this. Parts are plentiful and cheap and repairs can be done by most mechanics.

Even though this may strike thousands of nerves... Diesel?
Diesels are expensive, complex, and heavy. They have their uses to be sure but they are not always the best option.
 
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jetsetter

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LS1, LS6,LS2, LS3, L99, LS4, LS7, LS9 And LSA Engine History - LS Engine And LSX History
From the January, 2009 issue of GM High-Tech Performance
By Courtesy Of GM Performance Parts

LS heritage
The General Motors engine family commonly called the LS series debuted in the then-new1997 model year C5 Corvette as the all aluminum LS1 V8. General Motors called it the Gen III small-block V8 and a year later (the 1998 model year), the LS1 replaced the LT1 small-block in Camaros and Firebirds, which was followed by the iron-block version of the Gen III V8 appearing in the full size trucks and SUVs. The LS1 displaced 5.7 liters, similar to the previous-generation small-block, but the cubic-inch measurement differed slightly: 346 for the LS1 vs. the traditional 350 cubes.

In 1999, the Gen III platform spawned the higher-performance LS6 that was standard in the Corvette Z06. In 2005, the Gen IV branch of the LS family was born, differing from the Gen III with cast-in provisions for fuel-saving cylinder deactivation, larger displacements and revised camshaft sensing. The performance versions of the Gen IV include the LS2, LS3, LS9 supercharged, LSA supercharged and the LS7.

GM has continued to refer its modern V-8 engine family as Gen III and Gen IV, but to the enthusiasts who quickly grasped the tremendous performance potential of the engines, every engine based on the platform has been nicknamed "LSX." The range of production engines from the LS platform is wide. On the truck side, iron-block engines have included 4.8L and 5.3L versions, as well as all-aluminum 6.0L and 6.2L premium engines. Car engines include 5.3L, 5.7L, 6.0L, 6.2L and 7.0L displacements - including some configured for front-wheel-drive.

Gen III vs. Gen IV
Despite some significant differences between Gen III and Gen IV cylinder blocks, all LS engines share common traits that include:
* 4.40-inch bore centers (like the original small-block)
* Six-bolt, cross-bolted main bearing caps
* Center main thrust bearing
* 9.24-inch deck height
* Four-bolt-per-cylinder head bolt pattern
* 0.842-inch lifter bores
* Distributorless, coil-near-plug ignition system

The most distinguishing differences between Gen III and Gen IV cylinder blocks are larger bores (on some engines), different camshaft position sensor locations - indicated by a move to the front timing cover area on Gen IV blocks vs the top-rear position on Gen III blocks - and, on most Gen IV blocks, cast-in provisions for GM's Active Fuel Management cylinder deactivation system in the lifter valley.

There is great interchangeability between all LS engines, including between Gen III and Gen IV versions. Cylinder heads, crankshafts, intake manifolds and more can be mixed and matched - but the devil is in the details. Not every head matches every intake manifold and not every crankshaft works with every engine combination. Will Handzel's "How to Build High-Performance Chevy LS1/LS6 V-8s" - P/N 88958786 - is a great reference source that outlines the more specific differences and interchangeability among Gen III-based engines.

LS1/LS6
LS1 5.7L (346-cu-in) engines were produced between the 1997 and 2004 model years in the United States (Corvette, Camaro, Firebird and GTO) and stretching into 2005 in other markets (primarily Australia). The LS6 was introduced in 2001 in the Corvette Z06 and was manufactured through 2005, where it also was found in the first generation of the Cadillac CTS-V. The LS1 and LS6 share a 5.7L displacement, but the LS6 production engine uses a unique block casting with enhanced strength, greater bay-to-bay breathing capability and other minor differences. The heads, intake manifolds and camshaft also are unique LS6 parts.

LS2
In 2005, the LS2 6.0L (364 cu in) engine and the Gen IV design changes debuted. In GM performance vehicles, it was offered in the Corvette, GTO and even the heritage-styled SSR roadster. It is the standard engine in the Pontiac G8 GT. Its larger displacement brought greater power. The LS2 is one of the most adaptable engines, as LS1, LS6, LS3 and L92 cylinder heads work well on it.

LS3/L99
Introduced on the 2008 Corvette, the LS3 brought LS base performance to an unprecedented level: 430 horsepower from 6.2L (376 cu in) - making it the most powerful base Corvette engine in history. The LS3 block not only has larger bores than the LS2, but a strengthened casting to support more powerful 6.2L engines, including the LS9 supercharged engine of the Corvette ZR1. The LS3 is offered in the Pontiac G8 GXP and is also the standard V-8 engine in the new, 2010 Camaro SS. The L99 version is equipped with GM's fuel-saving Active Fuel Management cylinder deactivation system and is standard on 2010 Camaro SS models equipped with an automatic transmission.

LS4
Perhaps the most unique application of the LS engine in a car, the LS4 is a 5.3L version used in the front-wheel-drive Chevrolet Impala SS and Pontiac Grand Prix GXP. The LS4 has an aluminum block and unique, low-profile front-end accessory system, including a "flattened" water pump, to accommodate the transverse mounting position within the Impala and Grand Prix. It is rated at 303 horsepower and 323 lb-ft of torque.

LS7
A legend in its own time. The LS7 is the standard engine in the Corvette Z06 and its 7.0L displacement (427 cubic inches) makes it the largest LS engine offered in a production car. Unlike LS1/LS6, LS2 and LS3 engines, the LS7 uses a Siamese-bore cylinder block design - required for its big, 4.125-inch bores. Competition-proven heads and lightweight components, such as titanium rods and intake valves, make the LS7 a street-tuned racing engine, with 505 horsepower. LS7 engines are built by hand at the GM Performance Build Center in Wixom, Mich.

LS9
The most powerful production engine ever from GM, the LS9 is the 6.2L supercharged and charge-cooled engine of the Corvette ZR1. It is rated at an astonishing 638 horsepower. The LS9 uses the strengthened 6.2L block with stronger, roto-cast cylinder heads and a sixth-generation 2.3L Roots-type supercharger. Like the LS7, it uses a dry-sump oiling system. It is the ultimate production LS engine. It is built by hand at the GM Performance Build Center in Wixom, Mich.

LSA
A detuned version of the LS9, this supercharged 6.2L engine is standard in the 2009 Cadillac CTS-V. It is built with several differences, when compared to the LS9, including hypereutectic pistons vs. the LS9's forged pistons; and a smaller, 1.9L supercharger. The LSA also has a different charge-cooler design on top of the supercharger. Horsepower is rated at 556 in the super-quick Caddy.

Gen III & Gen IV Vortec truck engines
Although performance car engines have typically carried "LS" designations, truck engines built on this platform have been dubbed Vortec. In the beginning, they were generally distinguished by iron cylinder blocks and were offered in smaller displacements than car engines. Interestingly, a 5.7L Vortec "LS" engine has never been offered. Here's a quick rundown of the previous and current-production LS truck engines:
* 4.8L - The smallest-displacement LS engine (293 cu in); it uses an iron block with 3.78-inch bores and aluminum heads.
* 5.3L - The most common LS truck engine (327 cu in), it uses the same iron block with 3.78-inch bores as the 4.8L, but with a longer stroke , (3.62-inch)crank. Later versions equipped for Active Fuel Management. Manufactured with iron and aluminum cylinder blocks.
* 6.0L - Used primarily in 3/4-ton and 1-ton trucks, the 6.0L (364 cu in) uses an iron block (LY6) or aluminum block (L76) and aluminum heads, with provisions for Active Fuel Management; some equipped with variable valve timing.
* 6.2L - Commonly referred to by its L92 engine code, the 6.2L (376 cu in) engine uses an aluminum block and heads, and incorporates advanced technology including variable valve timing. The L92 is used primarily as a high-performance engine for the Cadillac Escalade and GMC Yukon Denali.

Non-production cylinder blocks
C5R: Developed for the factory-backed Corvette racing program, the C5R cylinder block has been manufactured in comparatively small quantities since 2000. They are manufactured with a unique aluminum alloy for greater strength and undergo a variety of specialized machining and inspection processes, including "hipping" to increase strength and X-raying that ensures against unacceptable porosity. A Siamese bore design with 4.117-inch finished bores enables 7.0L (427-cu-in) displacements. The C5R uses billet steel main caps with premium, 4340 fasteners. Racing-quality head studs are also included. All LS series heads will work with the C5R block, but maximum performance depends on maximum airflow.

LSX Bowtie Block (standard and tall-deck): Introduced in 2007, the LSX Bowtie Block is a durable and affordable cast iron casting that was designed to support extreme high-performance combinations, including provisions for six-bolts-per-cylinder head fastening. It has a Siamese bore design with 3.99-inch bores that must be finished to 4.00 inches - with a 4.25-inch recommended maximum bore. Maximum stroke can reach 4.25 inches, but rotating assembly interference on the cylinder must be taken into account for strokes greater than 4.125 inches; heavy metal is required for crankshaft balancing of larger-stroke combinations. Standard versions feature decks 0.020-inch taller than LS production blocks, with the tall-deck version manufactured with a 9.70-inch semi-finished deck height. The oiling system is a true priority-main system and all LS small-block heads work with the engine. Higher-airflow heads, such as LS7 and C5R, are recommended.

Crankshafts
Generally, LS crankshafts are similar in design, with identical 2.10-inch rod and 2.65-inch main journal sizes and a common rear main seal. All LS engines uses iron crankshafts except the LS7, LS9 and LSA; they used forged steel cranks (4.00-inch stroke on the LS7; 3.62-inch stroke on the LS9 and LSA).

The crankshaft sensing function of the distributorless ignition system depends on reading the toothed reluctor wheel on the crankshaft. Early LS engines mostly used 24-tooth wheels and upgraded a few years ago to 58-tooth (also known as 58X) wheels. When building an LS engine, it is imperative the correct reluctor wheel is used with the compatible crankshaft position sensor and ignition controller.

The crankshafts are mostly interchangeable, but the snouts on LS7 and LS9 crankshafts are approximately 1-inch longer to accommodate their two-stage oil pumps that work with the engines' dry-sump oiling systems. These forged crankshafts can be used on wet-sump engines by using a few specific components and/or modifications.

The easiest way to put a forged stroker crankshaft in your LS engine is using GM Performance Parts' new LSX crankshafts, which are available in four stroke sizes up to 4.125 inches. They feature the standard-length snout and can be used without modification on most engines. LS7 and LS9 crankshafts can be used, but require special components and/or modifications to their snouts to accommodate standard, wet-sump oiling systems.

Connecting Rods
LS connecting rods are very similar and interchangeable. Most are made of powdered metal, while the LS7 and LS9 rods are forged titanium. Rods lengths are similar, too, at 6.098-inch for 5.3L, 5.7L, 6.0L and 6.2L engines. The 4.8L engine uses 6.275-inch rods and the LS7 uses 6.067-inch rods. Since 2006, LS rods use bushed small ends. Also, LS6 rods bolts, P/N 11600158, offer a strength-enhancing upgrade to pre-2000 engines. Finally, because of the pistons' inner bracing, non-LS7 rods will not work with LS7 pistons; and the LS7 rods have a slightly different size than other LS rods, requiring a unique bearing, P/N 89017573.

Pistons
The LS9 is the only production LS engine with forged aluminum pistons; all the other use hypereutectic (cast) aluminum alloy pistons - varied mostly by diameter to accommodate various bore sizes. LS cast pistons shouldn't be used on applications greater than approximately 550 horsepower. Also, the LS7 piston's inner bracing requires the use of the matching LS7 connecting rod.

Cylinder Heads - Port Design Cylinder head interchangeability enables great parts mixing to build custom LS engine combinations, but the heads must be matched with intake manifolds that have compatible intake port configurations. The port sizes and shapes include:

Cathedral port - Introduced on the LS1 engine and used also on the LS6 and LS2, cathedral-port heads are named for the unique shape of the top of the intake port. Intake manifolds for LS1, LS2, LS6 and Vortec engines with cathedral-port heads are mostly interchangeable.

Rectangular port - LS7-style - The second LS intake runner design debuted on the Corvette Z06's LS7 engine. This rectangular design supports the straight-through airflow design of the heads. They feature 270cc intake ports and the ports and combustion chambers are CNC-ported from the factory. Use only with the LS7 intake manifold.

Rectangular port - L92 style - Similar to the LS7 design, but the ports are a little taller and a little narrower. They flow more than cathedral-port heads, but not as much as LS7 heads. In addition to the L92 6.2L engines, this port shape is also used on LS3 engines and some 6.0L truck engines, as well as the Corvette ZR1's LS9 and Cadillac CTS-V's LSA supercharged engines. Intake manifold bolt patterns are unique to this port design.

C5R heads - These heads pioneered the rectangular-port design, but because they are designed for professional finishing, their final shape and size depends on whoever is performing the porting.

Head-to-Block Compatibility
Because of their comparatively small bores - 3.89 inches - LS1 and LS6 engines can only use LS1, LS6 and LS2 heads. Using heads designed for larger engines will cause the valve-to-block interference. The larger, 4.00-inch bore of the LS2 enables it to use LS1/LS6 heads, as well as L92-style heads (including LS3, LS9 and LSA engines). The 6.2L engines (LS3, L92, etc.) can use any head except for the LS7 and C5R, while the 7.0L LS7 and C5R blocks can use any LS-series head. LS7 blocks should be matched with heads designed for at least 4.10-inch bores; and 4.125-inch bores are preferred.

Most LS production cylinder blocks share the came cylinder head bolt pattern and the same size head bolts - four 11mm bolts per cylinder (10 in total) and five upper, 8mm bolts. Early LS1 and LS6 engines used different-length 11mm bolts, but engines from 2004 and later use same-length bolts. LS9 engines use stronger, 12mm head bolts.

Non-production blocks, such as GM Performance Parts' LSX block and the C5R, offer the same head-bolt pattern as production blocks. All LS heads will bolt up to them, but care must be taken to select the most compatible heads based on the appropriate bore size. Because of their large bores, heads designed for at least 4.10-inch bores should be used and 4.125-inch bores are preferred, such as the L92/LS3 or LS7 heads; otherwise valve-to-block interference is an issue, as is sufficient cylinder sealing.

GM Performance Parts' new LSX cylinder heads use 10 11mm and 13 8mm head bolts, or eight more than a regular-production LS head. That's more than 50 percent more head bolts than production heads, supplying superior clamping strength.

http://www.gmhightechperformance.co...l99_ls4_ls7_ls9_lsa_engine_history/index.html
 

Wizegui

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I'm glad GM are upgrading the existing LS series V8s. I think with direct injection and some other good stuff, these new engines could be pretty awesome.
 

tigger

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One must also factor in the cost of the engine itself and the cost of repair. The engines are fairly cheap to produce and their price reflects this. Parts are plentiful and cheap and repairs can be done by most mechanics.
Of course. I knew I was forgetting something on that list. :lol:

Perfect for the Z28 they better fucking make.
I wish they would just start with a clean sheet for the Camaro. Even a thoroughly lightened Z28 model would still be a pig.
 

argatoga

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I wish they would just start with a clean sheet for the Camaro. Even a thoroughly lightened Z28 model would still be a pig.
Considering that it took them seventy million years to release this one, it'll be awhile.
 

_HighVoltage_

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Turbos add over 100lbs to the engine.
Erm...you had one, so you should probably know this. The 850 Turbo is no heavier than the regular 850. And the displacement difference is less than 100cc so that's negligible.
 
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