Intel Core 11th gen

jack_christie

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Hotter, slower, more expensive!
 

jack_christie

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When they hit 291w peak 💥
 

gaasc

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jack_christie

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Waste of sand?

 

jack_christie

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Delidding :eek:

 

Punisher Bass

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How crazy is it that Intel has more or less created their own version of the old AMD Bulldozer chips? And can you imagine how bad it would be for consumers right now if Ryzen had been another Bulldozer? The flagship Intel CPU would be 6 cores/threads clocked at 3.2ghz with a 3.4ghz turbo and it would retail for $1,500.
 

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And some will still buy it because "AMD is unreliable hobby shit."

My very outdated opinion about AMD was formed in my later teens, when your description fit AMD and their accompanying motherboards to a T.

These days idgaf because I don't use PC.
 

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Apple wanted to get away from Intel so they could exert even more control over their customers. They don't want anybody able to fix something, especially on their own, when it's much more profitable for them to make sure they're the only source for spare parts. Sell them a computer or phone that's non serviceable or can't be upgraded by them and they'll have to toss it out and buy a whole new one in 2-3 years.
 

jack_christie

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Apple wanted to get away from Intel so they could exert even more control over their customers. They don't want anybody able to fix something, especially on their own, when it's much more profitable for them to make sure they're the only source for spare parts. Sell them a computer or phone that's non serviceable or can't be upgraded by them and they'll have to toss it out and buy a whole new one in 2-3 years.

Partly. Intel dropped the ball and are still on 14Nm. In two years Intel say they will launch 7Nm.

The Apple M1 chip built by TSMC uses 5Nm process.

AMD may start using TSMC 5Nm this year or early next year.

Nvidia is also going down the ARM root. Probably built by Samsung or TSMC.
 

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The biggest reason is most likely the failed 2016 Macbook Pro launch, which was partly apple's fault (utterly useless keyboards and initial QC issues), and partly Intel's, who basically were unable to keep their processor thermals in check, forcing Apple to basically undervolt them at OS-level if they wanted to keep their original thermal solution (which is why they didn't throttle as badly on subsequent revisions, but will happily melt if you run Windows on them) plus assorted other nonsense like the 15" i9-equipped MBP's having worse sustained performance than base model i7 SKUs.

Thermal throttling on professional-oriented compact devices is not a problem exclusive to Apple, but they were the only ones who had almost a decade of making their own silicon for mobile devices. Not to mention they've got burned by stagnant tech before (PowerPC). Apple silicon was inevitable, people were saying it as far back as the 12" MacBook and its suspiciously compact board. The entire "Apple has control of everything and nobody else can get a piece" sure doesn't make them sad, but it may be more incidental than you think
 

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The biggest reason is most likely the failed 2016 Macbook Pro launch, which was partly apple's fault (utterly useless keyboards and initial QC issues), and partly Intel's, who basically were unable to keep their processor thermals in check, forcing Apple to basically undervolt them at OS-level if they wanted to keep their original thermal solution (which is why they didn't throttle as badly on subsequent revisions, but will happily melt if you run Windows on them) plus assorted other nonsense like the 15" i9-equipped MBP's having worse sustained performance than base model i7 SKUs.

Thermal throttling on professional-oriented compact devices is not a problem exclusive to Apple, but they were the only ones who had almost a decade of making their own silicon for mobile devices. Not to mention they've got burned by stagnant tech before (PowerPC). Apple silicon was inevitable, people were saying it as far back as the 12" MacBook and its suspiciously compact board. The entire "Apple has control of everything and nobody else can get a piece" sure doesn't make them sad, but it may be more incidental than you think

Partially, I think they also screwed themselves by not putting adequate cooling in there.

 

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Apple wanted to get away from Intel so they could exert even more control over their customers. They don't want anybody able to fix something, especially on their own, when it's much more profitable for them to make sure they're the only source for spare parts. Sell them a computer or phone that's non serviceable or can't be upgraded by them and they'll have to toss it out and buy a whole new one in 2-3 years.
This is not really true. What Apple wants is complete control of the user experience. When they control both the hardware and the software side, they can design both to fit each other. Also, in my experience Apple's devices generally last longer than others I have had, my old MacBook Air was completely fine to use for 10 years, iPhones receive the latest OS for more than five years etc.
 
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Punisher Bass

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This is not really true. What Apple wants is complete control of the user experience. When they control both the hardware and the software side, they can design both to fit each other. Also, in my experience Apple's devices generally last longer than others I have had, my old MacBook Air was completely fine to use for 10 years, iPhones receive the latest OS for more than five years etc.

How long does it take you to replace the battery in your iphone? How much does that cost you for Apple to do it? How easy is it for you to crack open an imac and blow the dust out before the piss poor form over function cooler design gets clogged up and your cpu gets thermal throttled?


With my phone, it takes me all of 10 seconds to open the back to replace the $16 battery, it takes me even less time to swap out an SD card. With my computer, if something goes wrong I'm not at the mercy of the company who built it, I can open it up to find and fix the problem myself. I don't have to void a warranty or pretend I'm performing brain surgery if I want to replace a hard drive.

Apple wants their customers to believe that they know what's best for them, so they need to take what they're given and shut the fuck up about it.
 

marcos_eirik

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How long does it take you to replace the battery in your iphone? How much does that cost you for Apple to do it? How easy is it for you to crack open an imac and blow the dust out before the piss poor form over function cooler design gets clogged up and your cpu gets thermal throttled?


With my phone, it takes me all of 10 seconds to open the back to replace the $16 battery, it takes me even less time to swap out an SD card. With my computer, if something goes wrong I'm not at the mercy of the company who built it, I can open it up to find and fix the problem myself. I don't have to void a warranty or pretend I'm performing brain surgery if I want to replace a hard drive.

Apple wants their customers to believe that they know what's best for them, so they need to take what they're given and shut the fuck up about it.
I have only had one battery replacement across a few iPhones I have owned since 2010. That battery replacement was April last year when the phone (iPhone 7) was about 3,5 years old, cost me $40, and took about 15 minutes, both the battery itself and the job to have it done. It was not strictly necessary, but I wanted a little bit better battery life until I could get my hands the iPhone 12 mini.

Hardly any phones have user replaceable batteries these days (aka, you have to heat up the glued on front or back and remove that to replace the battery), as most phone buyers rather have a larger battery and weather sealing, and have voted with their wallets for such. Just look at what's currently in the top 10 chart of phone sales, and what is currently made by Samsung, Oneplus, Xiaomi etc. All of those are glued together, only a very few have SD-card expansion slots.

Regarding my computer, I switched from my trusty old 2010 MacBook Air to an M1 MacBook Air very recently, and I'm still amazed at how fast this thing is. There is no cooling fan (just a good, efficient chip), so one less thing to break. At 1Tb it has four times the storage of my old MacBook Air, and could last me a good ten years, just like its predecessor.

Also, on a side note. I used to hate on Apple before, until I was fed up with the 2006 Dell Latitude laptop I had before that MacBook Air. Over 3,5 years that Dell had two battery replacements, I had to have the ram replaced, I had a harddisk fail, the WiFi-card had to be replaced, and the display started getting dead rows of pixels towards the end. All this shit was what made me try out a Mac just to see what the fuss was all about. Those ten years of trouble-free computer experience with the MacBook Air after that Dell nightmare, is what got me to buy a new Mac. My decade old MacBook Air is even on it's original battery and one charge still has 2-3 hours of useable battery life in it still.

Back to the thread topic, Intel is still in trouble, especially now that AMD has completely caught up with them, and has more competitive prices. In laptops they are even deeper in shit now that AMDs latest generation has made good progress in efficiency, and in performance per watt (which is a big deal in anything running on a battery) Apple's M1 is way superior to anything from Intel.
 
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