Is this it? 2015 6th gen Mustang

Dr_Grip

Made from concentrate
Joined
Jul 8, 2008
Messages
14,969
Location
HEL
Car(s)
79 Opel Kadett|72 Ford Country Sedan|92 Volvo 945
I know the TUV will inspect hydraulic circuits for braking systems, but I don't know that they inspect computer control logic? (I'm assuming this line lock feature merely uses the ABS pump to send pressure to the front wheels, hence its implementation must be via computer control.)
The every-two-year T?V roadworthiness certificate ("Hauptuntersuchung") lacks any ability for in-depth checks of the computer systems. That has been critizised by several pressure groups over the last years.
But it's not what I am talking about: The type approval for each new model that is allowed on German roads will be done by a T?V subsidy (or it's equivalent) as well. And they'll check the computers, I am sure.
 

sonza68

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 26, 2007
Messages
1,087
Location
Florissant, MO, US
Car(s)
'00 Cougar/'07 Explorer
I'm not familiar with the new Mustang's suspension, but the Mark VIII has two ball joints without being a true double a-arm suspension.

FFP050.gif


Part 3 is a traditional upper a-arm, but part 4 is the lower arm. Part 5 connects to the subframe on one end and the lower arm on the other, creating a quasi a-arm, but not one in the traditional sense.
 

headcrash

Member
Joined
Mar 11, 2007
Messages
70
Here in Germany, a line-lock is probably the most illegal retrofit this side of an afterburner. Wonder what the T?V would make of a factory-installed one...

I don't know about that. BMW brings the "Smokey Burnout Function" to idiots near you with the introduction of the M3/4.

'In BMW's own press-blurb words, "the Smokey Burnout function allows the driver to indulge in a degree of rear wheel spin while the car is moving at low speeds."' This reads as if this is something similar to a line lock.

Confirmed for Europe, no word about it in the NA press release.
 

CraigB

Ich bin ein Kartoffel
DONOR
Joined
Feb 14, 2007
Messages
16,653
Location
SWMO
Car(s)
Mustang SVO - Frontier Pro-4X - BRZ
I'm not familiar with the new Mustang's suspension, but the Mark VIII has two ball joints without being a true double a-arm suspension.

FFP050.gif


Part 3 is a traditional upper a-arm, but part 4 is the lower arm. Part 5 connects to the subframe on one end and the lower arm on the other, creating a quasi a-arm, but not one in the traditional sense.

That's what I assumed he meant. I really wish they would have released a little technical info about the car, not just what it was going to look like.
 

Cellos88GT

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 20, 2008
Messages
4,020
Location
Santa Cruz, CA
Car(s)
2 Fox Mustangs and a '00 VFR
I'm not familiar with the new Mustang's suspension, but the Mark VIII has two ball joints without being a true double a-arm suspension.

FFP050.gif


Part 3 is a traditional upper a-arm, but part 4 is the lower arm. Part 5 connects to the subframe on one end and the lower arm on the other, creating a quasi a-arm, but not one in the traditional sense.

2015mustang-frontsusp-L.jpg


Jack Hidley of Maximum Motorsports said:
The rear suspension is from a BMW M5. The front suspension is also from a BMW.

Look at the front suspension from the top (plan view). Draw lines through the two control arms. Where they meet is the virtual ball joint. Having two control arms with two ball joints allows the virtual ball joint to be put in a location where it would be impossible to put a physical ball joint. In addition, it also allows the virtual ball joint to move around based on the geometry of the control arms and spindle. This gives the designer more options for the dynamic change of scrub radius, caster trail, caster gain, etc.

Think of it just like a double A-arm suspension in the front view. The IC of the two control arms is the same as the virtual ball joint location.
 

chaos386

.sa = bad driver!
Joined
Nov 8, 2004
Messages
7,960
Location
Back in Saudia
Car(s)
SEAT Leon FR
I don't know about that. BMW brings the "Smokey Burnout Function" to idiots near you with the introduction of the M3/4.

'In BMW's own press-blurb words, "the Smokey Burnout function allows the driver to indulge in a degree of rear wheel spin while the car is moving at low speeds."' This reads as if this is something similar to a line lock.

Confirmed for Europe, no word about it in the NA press release.

That just sounds like lenient traction control, not a line lock.
 

Bretton Woods

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 17, 2006
Messages
2,055
Location
Australia
That has officially blown my mind. Where does it pivot to turn?

Edit:

Found one that includes the rear suspension as well.


That doesn't look any different from most set ups. Or am I missing what's so special about this double ball joint business?
 

IceBone

Blue Wheel Hipster
Joined
Jan 14, 2007
Messages
27,218
Location
Slovenistan
Car(s)
Audi A5 Quattro
Consindering not too long ago it was live axle, suspension tech from 10 years ago is hot shit!
 

Bretton Woods

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 17, 2006
Messages
2,055
Location
Australia
Nothing wrong with live axle in certain applications. If all you're doing is driving on perfectly smooth race tracks, there's not too much issue with the design.
 

Dr_Grip

Made from concentrate
Joined
Jul 8, 2008
Messages
14,969
Location
HEL
Car(s)
79 Opel Kadett|72 Ford Country Sedan|92 Volvo 945
I have no issue DD'ing my live axled car.
 

Cellos88GT

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 20, 2008
Messages
4,020
Location
Santa Cruz, CA
Car(s)
2 Fox Mustangs and a '00 VFR
That doesn't look any different from most set ups. Or am I missing what's so special about this double ball joint business?

Read what I posted, just 1 post ahead of the one you quoted.
 

ja404

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 15, 2007
Messages
813
Location
Franklin, MA
Car(s)
2013 Cadillac ATS 2.0T
That's my point. Live axle suspension isn't going to explode or spit you off the road. I'm not sure why everyone has such a downer on it.

Because everybody likes to think they know it all, and just regurgitate whatever they hear on the internet. I have never once experienced anything in my Mustang that made me think negatively of the axle out back. That includes powersliding on these bumpy New England roads.
 

Bretton Woods

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 17, 2006
Messages
2,055
Location
Australia


This is a 2012 BMW 328i, I stole the image from Edmunds. I now understand how it works and I'm sure it'll be a great boon to suspension part manufacturers.

I dislike how many degrees of freedom there are. I'm sure it's well set up and tuned, but surely a straight up double wishbone is still better.
 

Cellos88GT

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 20, 2008
Messages
4,020
Location
Santa Cruz, CA
Car(s)
2 Fox Mustangs and a '00 VFR
I dislike how many degrees of freedom there are. I'm sure it's well set up and tuned, but surely a straight up double wishbone is still better.

better than what for which application? Multi-links have a huge advantage when it comes to packaging and ride-comfort, in the case of the latter, a multi-link setup allows greater liberties with design and thus better management of NVH.
 
Top