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flyinhawaiian

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Conan

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IMG_1301.JPG
 

lip

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^ Lucerne, Switzerland. - Have you been on holidays here?

Edit: Btw, wow, a cockpit, a rallye car and a bridge... quite some radical change in this thread after lots and lots of sites with just birds. Animal and human ones. :lol:
 
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Conan

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^ Lucerne, Switzerland. - Have you been on holidays here?

Yes. :) Switzerland was gorgeous while my photography is merely mediocre. Couldn't really capture how beautiful it really is.
 
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Boobo-oobo

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Edit: Btw, wow, a cockpit, a rallye car and a bridge... quite some radical change in this thread after lots and lots of sites with just birds. Animal and human ones. :lol:

Then have some more weird stuff :D


IMG_6008 by Fuel Hunters, on Flickr
 
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flyinhawaiian

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How about a hole in the ground from 47,000 feet?


IMG_9985 by Jeff Fink, on Flickr

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meteor_Crater
The crater was created about 50,000 years ago during the Pleistocene epoch, when the local climate on the Colorado Plateau was much cooler and damper. The area was an open grassland dotted with woodlands inhabited by woolly mammoths and giant ground sloths. The crater was over 10,000 years old when the first humans saw it, at the earliest, 40,000 years ago.

Since the crater's formation, the rim is thought to have lost 15?20 meters of height at the rim crest due to natural erosion. Similarly, the basin of the crater is thought to have approximately 30 meters of additional postimpact sedimentation from lake sediments and of alluvium. These erosion processes are the reason we see very few remaining craters on Earth, since many have been erased by this geological process. The relatively young age of Meteor Crater, paired with the Arizona climate, have allowed this crater to remain as we see it today. The lack of erosion that preserved the crater's shape helped lead to this crater being the first crater recognized as an official impact crater from a natural celestial body.

The object that excavated the crater was a nickel-iron meteorite about 50 meters (160 feet) across. The speed of the impact has been a subject of some debate. Modeling initially suggested that the meteorite struck at up to 20 kilometers per second (45,000 mph) but more recent research suggests the impact was substantially slower, at 12.8 kilometers per second (28,600 mph). It is believed that about half of the impactor's bulk was vaporized during its descent. Impact energy has been estimated at about 10 megatons. The meteorite was mostly vaporized upon impact, leaving little in the crater.
 
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flyinhawaiian

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IMG_9942 by Jeff Fink, on Flickr

Approaching daylight over the North Atlantic, headed east
 

evoWALO

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Olive-backed sunbird (Cinnyris jugularis) by alabang, on Flickr

The olive-backed sunbird (Cinnyris jugularis), also known as the yellow-bellied sunbird, is a species of sunbird found from Southern Asia to Australia.
Common names for this bird include "tamsi"[1] in the Philippines and "kelicap" in Malaysia.
The sunbirds are a group of very small Old World passerine birds which feed largely on nectar, although they will also take insects, especially when feeding young. Their flight is fast and direct on their short wings. Most species can take nectar by hovering, but usually perch to feed most of the time.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Olive-backed_sunbird

Location: http://mambukalresort.negros-occ.gov.ph/
 

Captain_Whine

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evoWALO

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Thanks Whine


Brown-breasted Kingfisher (Halcyon gularis) by alabang, on Flickr

The Brown-breasted Kingfisher (Halcyon gularis) is a tree kingfisher found in the Philippines. This kingfisher is a resident over much of its range, although some populations may make short distance movements. It can often be found well away from water where it feeds on a wide range of prey that includes small reptiles, amphibians, crabs, small rodents and even birds. During the breeding season they call loudly in the mornings from prominent perches including the tops of buildings in urban areas or on wires.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White-throated_kingfisher

Location: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doña_Remedios_Trinidad,_Bulacan
 

villej

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I have not been taking much pictures lately, but after a long pause I took a camera with me yesterday. It was a nice day to spend quite some time walking on snow along a river.

12890938_10205993575740743_8912845459726623660_o.jpg
 

evoWALO

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Brown-breasted Kingfisher (Halcyon gularis) by alabang, on Flickr

Upon the recommendation of a user I have desaturated my bird as it was generating blown highlights and false colors.

The motion blur of the bird flipping the crustacean was caused by my 1/200 shutter speed. If given a chance to do it again I would increase it to 1/500.

I posted the slightly out of focus image because I felt that the subject matter of the bird eating was stronger and conveyed a compelling story.
 
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