Unverified Ownership My 2021 Korean 38kWh Appliances (Toaster Electric & Moomin EV)

public

Captain Slow Charging
DONOR
Joined
Nov 26, 2007
Messages
12,222
Location
Causticity
Car(s)
Atomic toaster
Ioniq approaching 17000km and the Niro is at 6000km. I'm a little behind with the km accumulation with the Ioniq, as I should probably have a couple thousand more on the clock already, but WFH and the recently acquired family expansion package have meant I haven't driven it to the office as much as I could. I plan to catch up, and at the very least I can do some summer driving without looking at the odo too closely.

And related to that: I have another Hyundai EV on order for next summer. After mulling it over for a week or two, I ended up signing the forms for a 64kWh Kona in the fully loaded Style trim. The other option would have been the Ioniq 5 with the 2023 upgrades, but it would have been a bit more in every respect and I'll rather drive a frugal pocket rocket to the office than an RWD SUV that cannot match the efficiency - plus the winter tire package for the Ioniq 5 would have been considerably more expensive. I should be handing the Ioniq 38kWh over and getting the Kona around late spring/early summer 2023, if the wait lists stay as is. By that time, the Ioniq should have around 40k km.
 

NooDle

Ik ben niet alleen lekker met kaas!
Joined
Jul 20, 2005
Messages
10,310
Location
Belgium
Car(s)
Kia EV6 "Mullet"
Congrats! I see the love for Hyundai EVs is strong? My wife has a petrol Kona and lives it. I drove (and liked) the Kona EV a few tears ago, although 200+ hp and FWD and instant torque was a bit much at times
 

public

Captain Slow Charging
DONOR
Joined
Nov 26, 2007
Messages
12,222
Location
Causticity
Car(s)
Atomic toaster
Oh yeah, I've gotten so used to the controls by now :D Also, the Kona should match the consumption figures of the Ioniq while having a comfortably longer range. The downside will be that it'll be smaller and louder inside, but as we haven't put the child seat in the Ioniq once, it's obvious that whatever is the other car in the family will do the hauling (Niro now, e-2008 later) and the other car will just be my commuter, and I want to do my yearly 25000km paying as little for electricity as possible. As for the road noise, I'll probably just stuff the spare tire well with insulation and see if it improves things.
 

NooDle

Ik ben niet alleen lekker met kaas!
Joined
Jul 20, 2005
Messages
10,310
Location
Belgium
Car(s)
Kia EV6 "Mullet"
Honestly, the noise wasn't that bad to my ears (was used to an eGolf at the time, which is sooooper quiet).
I'm still comparing it to my wife's petrol Kona though, which has the 1.0 3 cylinder, which is on the loud/raspy side?
My EV6 feels a bit louder than the Golf was too, mostly wind/road noise because bigger, heavier car, and 20" wheels as opposed to 16"

I guess road noise is a thing in Scandinavia? I hear/read roads are a lot rougher there because they need to withstand frost for longer?
We have pretty smooth/quiet roads but potholes everywhere though, I dunno which is worse
 

Perc

Very Odd Looking Vehicular Object
Joined
Mar 31, 2008
Messages
6,396
Location
Finland
Car(s)
Passat Alltrack
I guess road noise is a thing in Scandinavia? I hear/read roads are a lot rougher there because they need to withstand frost for longer?
We have pretty smooth/quiet roads but potholes everywhere though, I dunno which is worse

Our road surfaces are constantly worn down and coarse, partly because of the climate I guess but also because almost everyone drives on studded tires all winter long.
 

public

Captain Slow Charging
DONOR
Joined
Nov 26, 2007
Messages
12,222
Location
Causticity
Car(s)
Atomic toaster
Yeah they usually have very coarse ruts and ridges. Steer a little to the right and the car quietens down a notch. It's good that I'll be moving from the Ioniq to the Kona and not directly from the well-isolated Volvo, so my ears will have accustomed.

Also, I ordered the car on studded tires as well. :neutral:
 

public

Captain Slow Charging
DONOR
Joined
Nov 26, 2007
Messages
12,222
Location
Causticity
Car(s)
Atomic toaster
Passed the 10 000 km mark today. The indicated average energy consumption for this has been 16.1kWh/100km, which would make energy costs around the same as two trips to Helsinki and back from here. But in fact they're a bit less, because of free charging at work so far.

I'm also looking forward for warming temps so that CCS charging would become a bit faster.

Six months later (almost to the day), 20 000 km. Indicated average is exactly at 15kWh/100km, thanks to warmer months in between.

Also, I've seen 47-49kW charging speeds during warm days, which was excellent :cool:

Free charging at work has been over for quite some time, though, as we have 22kW chargers that cost 20 cents/kWh. I still tend to charge at work often because it's very convenient and not that much more expensive than home charging, and it's claimed to be all windpower.
 

eizbaer

Forum Addict
DONOR
Joined
Nov 24, 2008
Messages
6,839
Location
Cologne, Germany
Car(s)
Model 3, Cargobike
I'm at 32ct/kWh at work and consider myself very lucky to get that... but then again, Germany is a bit "different" regarding electricity prices nowadays. You'd struggle to find a new home contracts for much less than 50 ct/kWh currently... o_O
Still, PV guy came by our house last week and was pretty confident he could get us a system up and running by the end of the year. And even with the elevated prices for PV parts because of high demand currently, we'll probably end up somewhere around effectively 10-12 ct/kWh (considering cost and lifetime of the system, plus the damn taxes I have to pay on my self-made electricity (wtf?)) if I manage to use exclusively that for charging (ugh, already dreading having to fiddle some energy management system for that).
 

public

Captain Slow Charging
DONOR
Joined
Nov 26, 2007
Messages
12,222
Location
Causticity
Car(s)
Atomic toaster
Yeah, our current electricity contract is 5.5 cents /kWh for most of the time and something like 6-7 cents for the winter days, plus taxes, grid fees and other fees which bring it somewhere near 15 cents-ish/kWh in total. The contract runs out in Oct 2023, and like everyone else in Finland currently, I am hoping our new OL3 nuclear power plant will save us by that time :D Right now you'll be lucky to get a 25c/kWh contract (plus fees), some of them are touching 50c, and the coming winter will be interesting to say the least. Compare that to last winter where I could charge for free at work (which I did do yesterday because the chargers were unreachable due to paving work)...

One of the semi-sensible ways is to have a market based electricity contract and try to schedule all possible electricity usage for the nighttime hours when electricity is near free, but that takes a lot of effort and isn't foolproof.
 

eizbaer

Forum Addict
DONOR
Joined
Nov 24, 2008
Messages
6,839
Location
Cologne, Germany
Car(s)
Model 3, Cargobike
One of the semi-sensible ways is to have a market based electricity contract and try to schedule all possible electricity usage for the nighttime hours when electricity is near free, but that takes a lot of effort and isn't foolproof.
Yeah, it does take some getting used to and in the current situation these contracts are prohibitively expensive during the high-price times, because they only use the spot-market to cover their needs... which is currently the only way to really get hourly tariffs, but actualyl quite dumb from a purchasing perspective, since you could (in the past at least...) get much better prices, if you actually knew your consumption well in advance (that's basically what the usual "flat price" tariffs make use of).

Once I have PV i'll be in the same boat, having to move as much of my consumption as possible into the daytime hours to get my feeding back into the grid as close to 0 as possible, because we don't get the dutch / belgian (i think?) model, where the grid is sort of treated as a "battery" and any surplus is netted against the rest of the consumption. no, any feeding into the grid, I'll be getting a whopping 6ct/kWh in return. nice :|
 
Last edited:

Matt2000

An Unfortunate Discovery
DONOR
Joined
Feb 17, 2006
Messages
17,124
Location
Four from the top and two from the third row, UK.
Car(s)
'12 MX-5 PRHT, '02 Freelander, '90 Disco 1 Bobtail
no, any feeding into the grid, I'll be getting a whopping 6ct/kWh in return. nice :|
Wow, what an incentive to install PV. A work colleague has had PV installed earlier in the year and still doesn't have storage or a grid connection yet, he's complaining about how much he could have made from selling to the grid. This site shows the variable Octopus rate for our area in GBP, it's very strong at the moment.

https://www.energy-stats.uk/octopus-agile-outgoing-export-east-midlands/

As he can use the PV power but has no EV (don't ask), I only semi-jokingly suggested he puts the power into producing hydrogen and storing it.

Sorry for the slight OT away from the car, my interest in the PV systems of others is 100% based on jealousy. :razz:
 

NooDle

Ik ben niet alleen lekker met kaas!
Joined
Jul 20, 2005
Messages
10,310
Location
Belgium
Car(s)
Kia EV6 "Mullet"
Unteresting! Our prices are more around the 0,35€/kwh now, but PVs only make sense if you can use the electricity generated immediately (or store it in a battery) since injecting it back into the grid only pays out some ridiculously low number like 0,05€/kwh.... so this ends up with people having their AC on full blast and the windows open/electric heater on and windows open since using the electrity beats the measly couple of cents you get back. The solution, of course, is plugging in your EV when the sun is shining... (or getting a huge home battery, but that's not very cost effective unless you get a huge one)
 

eizbaer

Forum Addict
DONOR
Joined
Nov 24, 2008
Messages
6,839
Location
Cologne, Germany
Car(s)
Model 3, Cargobike
Ah cool, so it is only the dutch who do net metering and in belgium it's basically the same as over here. they changed the legislation recently, which is utter bollox: now, if you commit to ONLY feeding into the grid, you get about double the rate. but then you're not allowed to consume any of that yourself. so yeah, as noodle said: it really only makes sense to use as much as possible for yourself and it'd basically be prudent to just dump any excess you have into hot water or something (since 6ct/kWh is cheaper than gas or any other form of energy you could get for heating your shower/bath water).
 
Top