Porsche Tuning Culture in Japan

Roman

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Jan 15, 2005
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Qu?bec, Canada
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Boring '02 Accent.
Not liking the jdm styling on some of those porsches. I dunno it just doesn't work.
I like TE37 wheels and i like porsches but i don't like te37s on porsches. Work that out. :?
Too square a wheel (wheel spokes) on a very rounded car.
You're right it doesn't look right to me either.

And I :love: those wheels (when on the right car).
I respect the Porsches but I don't like them all that much.
 

Leonidae

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Jun 2, 2006
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Finland
Agreed. Panasport / Watanabe wheels look great on a lot of vehicles.

especially older vehicles, be it Euro or JDM car. Too bad that Watanabe versions are out of production now, the price for those is astronomical. But then again, they're a copy of Minilites, and they're not cheap either.. :cry:
 

Arctor

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97 MX-5 M, 90 928GT, 89 635CSi
Wow these are much better than I thought they were going to be.

You see the Japanese think that the engine is in front so they put a spoiler on to keep the rear end down.

Actually additional downforce on the rear of the car will only help a RR car...
 

Censport

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Didn't the 993 GT2 racer have that huge spoiler?
That's what I was thinking too. Any Porsche experts here to chime in?

Well, I raced 964 and 993 GT2 and RS Americas back in the day. While the street version had the spoiler you see in speedycatz's post, we always added the extension at the track. This was to get the wing up into the better airflow, making it more effective at keeping the car's arse on the ground at high speeds.

Contrary to cxo's post, Porsche 911's have always had a tendency for lift at the back. This wasn't because of engine placement, but because of the car's sloping rear. Aerodynamically, it's terrible. It doesn't give a clean break, so there is too much turbulence, which creates lift at high speeds. Having the engine in the rear makes it worse when you get to the end of a long straight and you start braking, as you combine the aerodynamic lift with the pendulum effect of a rear-engine car.

On the old torsion-bar 911s, I prefer the clean look of not having a spoiler. And that's fine for the street, as long as you don't drive on the autobahn. But on my own personal 1983 911 SC Targa, I had the front and rear spoilers from a 911 Turbo. Because, um, well, I didn't always obey the speed limits.
 
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