project car brainstorm

argatoga

Can't Start His Wank
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Oct 4, 2005
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Zagreb
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'08 Pontiac Solstice GXP
A PP will destroy a street port all over the map, even low RPM. They make huge power even down low. Fuel mileage is really the only downside.

Peripheral Port
The peripheral port is the ultimate form of porting for a rotary engine without turning to forced induction. Instead of conventional metal shaping with a grinder, the side ports are actually filled and completely new circular - peripheral - intake ports are fitted directly through the rotor housing and is easily identified on an engine by its tubular intake manifold. This modification has potential for over 300hp but as it is developed for racing, results in very poor drivability, fuel consumption and needs an exhaust system designed to produce excessive noise. Like the bridge port, the PP produces its maximum power past 8,000rpm creating increased stress and wear on components.
And instead of idling at around 1,000 ? 1,500rpm for the previous porting methods, the PP engine will not idle much below 2,000rpm and is impractical and virtually unusable on the street.

PRO'S: The ultimate form of rotary porting for maximum power
CON'S: Excessive noise, extensive intake mods, very poor drivability and fuel consumption, relatively short engine life, very expensive, narrow power band

http://www.mazdarotary.net/porting.htm
 

Eunos_Cosmo

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'84 Mazda RX7, '12 Mazda 2, '99 Porsche Boxster

Yes that is a very well known article. It only claims engine durability is short because it needs to be revved to the sky. This isn't a bridgeport though, the actual integrity of the block is much higher. There has been quite a lot of talk on rx7 club lately...a sort of re-evaluation of how a PP engine can behave. I'm not sure if you've heard of semi-pp motors, but they apparently have very good drivability, almost to the level of a street port, but make huge power.
 

tigger

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Dec 11, 2006
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'88 Vic Wagon, '92 Honda VFR
I'm not a badge snob
They are great cars though. Lightweight, good chassis, huge aftermarket and they're cheap. Every autocross I've ever attended had E30s cleaning up.

Let's say $2,000 for a 325i you wouldn't mind beating on. For starters add:
$400 on high performance summer tires
$150 on good brake pads
$50 on high temp brake fluid
Now you're destroying the street stock class at your local SCCA autocross.

Go through the suspension, do some bolt-ons and exhaust, run wider wheels/tires and you're in street prepared. You could probably build an extremely competitive street prepared E30 for 6 grand. Of course then you'd have to run against all the other E30s in street prepared.
 

tigger

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^ I know all about E30s but saying that "its made in bavaria ja?" wont do anything to sway me in its direction; its a piss-poor argument.
You're never going to see me disagree with that. That BMW badge snobbery is now a running joke among my friends (since I bought my $500 325e). As in, "Tigger doesn't use turn signals because he's a BMW driving prick. ... No, Tigger doesn't use turn signals because his turn signals don't work." etc etc

btw, if I was to ever get an E30, it would be a 318 - the i-6 makes the car nose-heavy
From what I've seen, that's not true. If anything the opposite is the case. For the early 318 and all 325 models the weight distribution is 53/47. For later 318 models it actually gets worse (54/46). The only thing a 318 has going for it is that its 200 pounds lighter than even my 325e. My car weighs in over 2600 lbs but an early 318 is closer to 2400, even a little below it.
 
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