Question about EV traction control

CraigB

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Trying to sort something out so I know how traction control works on EVs. This has rule implementation consequences at our racetrack.

I'll try and boil it down as simple as I can.

Can traction control be completely defeated in a stock EV (Tesla, Mustang Mach E, Rivian, Lucid, etc.)?
 
As a VW nuub, no there is no button to turn of Tracktion control in current id.3/4/5/7 (and platform sharing cars).
i assume its similar on the chinese ones, but i can be totally wrong.
 
I can turn the traction control off on the Mach-E. There's a dedicated button, a short press turns it down, a press and hold fully disables it.

Well, as much as it can be disabled, I assume there's still a degree of some balancing.
 
While I have no firsthand knowledge of current EVs, the fact that ESP-type systems can not be fully disabled has been bothering us with icetrack beaters for a long time - with Mercs from this century (post moose test debacle) you need to provoke error codes/CELs to fully kill it for example, and according to the manual on my 2003 Volvo XC70, ESP can not be fully turned off for all engine types.
 
Dad banned EVs from bracket racing (handicap start) on the basis that the vehicle can't fully defeat the traction control. Traction control is not allowed in this time of racing for ICE vehicles. Just trying to figure out if what he has done is defendable.
 
Dad banned EVs from bracket racing (handicap start) on the basis that the vehicle can't fully defeat the traction control. Traction control is not allowed in this time of racing for ICE vehicles. Just trying to figure out if what he has done is defendable.
I think it's defendable if you are as hard on at least some ICE cars with similar electronics. One key difference may be that in order to get to competitive drag racing specs, most ICE cars will no longer be on the stock computers any more...
 
"Give it more fuel than it should need and spark around the time it should explode and Bob's your uncle."
 
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Yep, you can turn it ALL THE way off with a simple button press. As it should be. Was the same in my Golf too.
Aside from doing stupid dorifto things in the snow, I don't really see the point though.

On a modern ICE, can you really really turn everything off nowadays? I think there's always some degree of ass saving going on, be it braking a single wheel or giving more power to one wheel...
 
"Give it more fuel than it should need and spark around the time it should explode and Bob's your uncle."

Really it's more advanced that on some of these engines. The carburetors are pretty advanced and so are the ignition systems. That's some of them, others are as you described.

Yep, you can turn it ALL THE way off with a simple button press. As it should be. Was the same in my Golf too.
Aside from doing stupid dorifto things in the snow, I don't really see the point though.

On a modern ICE, can you really really turn everything off nowadays? I think there's always some degree of ass saving going on, be it braking a single wheel or giving more power to one wheel...

Not too many modern cars in Bracket Racing. Even if they are newer, it's been built around a tube chassis and none of the safety devices that were in the road going version remain.

This leads me to what I think is the whole issue here. Bracket racers are "old school" (nice way of saying Neanderthals) and fear change (a nice way of saying they voted for Trump).
 
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