Random Thoughts... [Automotive Edition]

I am curious, what's with the questions about gas stations?
I was thinking about it because @93Flareside was talking about wanting to pay at an ev charging point rather than an app. It made me think about my behavior and expectations. Filling your car with fuel was an experience that used to be fairly uniform. Besides fuel types I asked a few people in my life what they do from how they chose to the physical interaction.

It's an interesting inception of behavior to activity or activity to behavior.

Nope, all cards, no need to get extra help.
Do you go to convenience stores apart from going to get gas as part of your routine?

For the local place, every time. They don't have card readers at the pump. I tend to use the non-prepay pump so I can fill up, then go in and pay cash. Also know the folks behind the counter, we usually tell a few lies before someone else comes in and I continue my day.

If I am at a place out of town, I'd say nine times out of ten I go in. Mostly because I need to either grab a drink/snack or use their facilities.
If tomorrow they installed a new pump would you use your phone to pay for your gas?
 
I was thinking about it because @93Flareside was talking about wanting to pay at an ev charging point rather than an app. It made me think about my behavior and expectations. Filling your car with fuel was an experience that used to be fairly uniform. Besides fuel types I asked a few people in my life what they do from how they chose to the physical interaction.

It's an interesting inception of behavior to activity or activity to behavior.

Ah, I thought it was related, but was curious.

The biggest change for me was the expectation to prepay. The first time I encountered it was in Las Vegas in 2004. Made my head hurt.


If tomorrow they installed a new pump would you use your phone to pay for your gas?

I have in the past used my phone to buy gas, but I still prefer to pay with cash. I have it, it's a pain in the butt to drive 10 miles to the bank and put cash in the bank to then use a card/phone. This again, probably has to do with my rural location in a town of 193 (I looked up the last census, we've lost 25 people in 20 years).
 
my rural location in a town of 193 (I looked up the last census, we've lost 25 people in 20 years).
I'm sorry for your loss.
I have in the past used my phone to buy gas, but I still prefer to pay with cash... location
I was surprised the number of people who use ApplePay.
 
Nah, I've gotta watch my pennies, and everything's too expensive there. Pay at the pump, and leave when I'm done. If I need something, I'll stop elsewhere.
Do you buy those items "too expensive there" elsewhere, what is it and where?

I'm more a water and cereal bar unopened in the glove compartment person.

Only when I'm on a road trip.
I have used 7/11, Rocket, Dashmart for sugarwater munchies at an off hour. What do you get when you do go in? Also would a discounted drink or food item offered though an app draw you in to the store?
 
The interviewer is too. lol
Your response to the test is part the test. Am I in the test...

Have you ever examined the nature of your relationship with commerce?

Seriously though fuel for your vehicle is a big expense and the infrastructure built up around separating you from your money vs people's behavior is interesting. It's also variable experience that we tailor.
 
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I've always thought the convenience store was a place for vice. Fuel for gas guzzling vehicles, salty snacks and other low nutrition prepackaged foods (and any real food is overpriced, out of date or of questionable quality), soda and candy for your sweet tooth, lottery tickets for the gamblers (and now slot machines, illegally in Missouri, legally in Illinois), cigarettes and other tobacco products for the nicotine addicted (and "tobacco pipes" for those who prefer marijuana), beer, wine and liquor for those that partake, etc. Just nothing particularly good in one of these stores, yet they are ubiquitous on the American landscape. What would a road trip be without them?
 
Do you buy those items "too expensive there" elsewhere, what is it and where?
Grocery store. If I need a beverage while I'm out longer than expected and I've already consumed the liquid I left the house with, I will leave the gas station after my fill-up, and go to a nearby supermarket. If I need a snack or meal while I'm out, same thing. Even if I really just want some junk food, it's still cheaper at a supermarket.
I'm more a water and cereal bar unopened in the glove compartment person.
I'm a water bottle and reuseable container of pretzels or cheez-its (portioned out from a larger package) person
 
I've always thought the convenience store was a place for vice. Fuel for gas guzzling vehicles, salty snacks and other low nutrition prepackaged foods (and any real food is overpriced, out of date or of questionable quality), soda and candy for your sweet tooth, lottery tickets for the gamblers (and now slot machines, illegally in Missouri, legally in Illinois), cigarettes and other tobacco products for the nicotine addicted (and "tobacco pipes" for those who prefer marijuana), beer, wine and liquor for those that partake, etc. Just nothing particularly good in one of these stores, yet they are ubiquitous on the American landscape. What would a road trip be without them?

Or in Germany the front counter next to the register is of questionable age warmed sausages in a vertical steamer, as well sandwiches and bread rolls of questionable age too.

Also, the Haribo gummy bear shelf…
 
I've always thought the convenience store was a place for vice. Fuel for gas guzzling vehicles, salty snacks and other low nutrition prepackaged foods (and any real food is overpriced, out of date or of questionable quality), soda and candy for your sweet tooth, lottery tickets for the gamblers (and now slot machines, illegally in Missouri, legally in Illinois), cigarettes and other tobacco products for the nicotine addicted (and "tobacco pipes" for those who prefer marijuana), beer, wine and liquor for those that partake, etc. Just nothing particularly good in one of these stores, yet they are ubiquitous on the American landscape. What would a road trip be without them?
I read one of the designers of convenience stores or c-stores.
“The branding used to be all about speed, more of a NASCAR aesthetic. But today, the one thing everyone wants to portray is freshness. No one wants to be the beer, cigs, and lottery place. They want to be the fresh panini and juice place.”

Seth Maddox, Creative Director at King Retail Solutions
There are a bunch of designs that seemingly try to hide the vice...
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alltown-fresh-9-2020-10.jpg

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alltown-fresh-9-2020-02.jpg

All the same Frito-Lay and Pepsi but with avocado... Would that make you feel better about going to a c-store?

Grocery store. If I need a beverage while I'm out longer than expected and I've already consumed the liquid I left the house with, I will leave the gas station after my fill-up, and go to a nearby supermarket. If I need a snack or meal while I'm out, same thing. Even if I really just want some junk food, it's still cheaper at a supermarket.

I'm a water bottle and reuseable container of pretzels or cheez-its (portioned out from a larger package) person
What if the store was larger like a small grocery store sized like trader joes sized? Would that lure you?

vertical steamer, as well sandwiches and bread rolls of questionable age too
You had me at vertical steamer... What is a vertical steamer?
 
What if the store was larger like a small grocery store sized like trader joes sized? Would that lure you?
It's 100% about price for me. If the store attached to the gas station had the same prices as a grocery store, but a much more limited selection? I'd still be OK with that.
 
All the same Frito-Lay and Pepsi but with avocado... Would that make you feel better about going to a c-store?
I've only seen a couple like this on my travels. Mostly in more upscale areas. Only thing I can really remember picking up in one was some Bundaberg root beer for the wife, she likes it and it can be difficult to find.

I'm more likely to end up in a Quick Trip or Casey's. They have all sorts of hot food and things the local store doesn't. Still, I'm more likely to just get a zero calorie soda and the occasional donut at Casey's.

I did get a BBQ beef sandwich at Quick Trip in Catoosa, Oklahoma earlier this year. Probably won't do that again.

I did visit the local store twice today. First trip was for a quart of oil, second for gas and a soda.

What if the store was larger like a small grocery store sized like trader joes sized? Would that lure you?

Sort of like bodega? I like the idea of smaller stores, especially if locally owned.

My little town used to have a grocery store, tractor dealer, butcher, bank, etc. All were gone before we moved here. Seems a shame that I have to drive 10 miles for everything.

Dollar General is huge in this area (Is there an area out isn't?). I don't frequent them often, though the wife is known to stop at them once every couple weeks to snag something she forgot at the grocery store.
 
It's 100% about price for me. If the store attached to the gas station had the same prices as a grocery store, but a much more limited selection? I'd still be OK with that.
With most regular supermarkets putting a bunch of EV chargers (even high power fast chargers) in their lots, the trend seems to be going that way... sort of :p
 
In 2013 I bought the last car I owned. A brand new FIAT Palio Sporting. Retail was R$40.000, and I paid R$38.000 because I paid in full and it was a car that was already in the lot, so no ordering, no bullshit.
2020 comes and we are moving to Portugal. I checked the market price listing for it (the one used by insurance companies) and I see it is around R$27.000. I sell it for R$25.000 because we are in a hurry and the car has 120.000km and anything over 100.000km in Brazil in considered junk, no matter the condition (yes, Brazilians can be very stubborn).
Yesterday I was talking to my 14-year-old son and he mentions he misses that car, and we started wondering how much they're going for today.
Turns out it's R$39.000. I suspect that the surge in price for new car in Brazil since 2013 has something to do with it. That same car I bought was discontinued in 2017, and it was being sold for R$60.000
As of today, the cheapest FIAT for sale in Brazil is the Mobi:
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As you can see, it's a 1.0 liter car. That's it. It retails for R$70.000, which coincidentally is what the R$38k I paid in 2013 would be today if ajusted for inflation...
I don't have a point to this post, or lesson, other than "I am never going back to Brazil, and if I do, I am never buying a brand new car again."
 
It is indeed getting ridiculous if you look at. Your post made me curious so I opened up the VW car configurator to try and configure a VW Caddy as close as possible to what we bought brand new 5years ago. I know it is a completely different car now with the new generation Caddy, but it ended up around 38.000euro while we paid around 21.500euro 5years ago...
The only advantage of these ridiculous prices is that we were able to sell if for roughly 90% of what we originally paid for it.
 
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