Random Thoughts... [Automotive Edition]

If the rear wiper was constantly on as well, i think we have a full house.
so much this. How can you not hear/notice this? Same goes with having the right blinker on on the highway for aaaaages, it clicks every second, do you not hear it?
 
so much this. How can you not hear/notice this? Same goes with having the right blinker on on the highway for aaaaages, it clicks every second, do you not hear it?

These are the people that brake for empty roundabouts. What do you expect?
 
Saw this on Reddit.
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The General Population's thoughts about EV:s part XXIV: the risk of running out of electricity. You can't keep a spare jerry can of electricity in the trunk to pour in when you run out, and this is bad.
Because running out of fuel is apparently a weekly occurrence among traditional car owners.

Back on planet earth, diesel engines need to be bled before they'll start again. It's very far from just dumping a can of fuel in and turning the key. But people that have been driving diesel for 30 years probably don't actually know this because they've never needed to learn. They fuel up in time, because that's what people in the real world do.
 
The only scenario where I can see that happening is with a small battery Stellantis EV with the guess-o-meter in cahoots with the battery percentage suddenly dropping due to extreme winter conditions. Hasn't happened to us, but if you trust the 320-330km range it proudly claims at 100%...
 
The General Population's thoughts about EV:s part XXIV: the risk of running out of electricity. You can't keep a spare jerry can of electricity in the trunk to pour in when you run out, and this is bad.
Because running out of fuel is apparently a weekly occurrence among traditional car owners.

Back on planet earth, diesel engines need to be bled before they'll start again. It's very far from just dumping a can of fuel in and turning the key. But people that have been driving diesel for 30 years probably don't actually know this because they've never needed to learn. They fuel up in time, because that's what people in the real world do.
Same thing goes every time I use my car to power anything, people joking 'you won't have enough power to get home'.... sigh...


Also as an aside to this : what if there's a blizzard and you need to spend x hours in the car in traffic? your car will run out of electricity soon(TM) and you will freeze and they will only find you as a corpsicle.
(spoiler : blizzards aren't a thing where I live, and I've never had a traffic jam in .be go on for more than 3 hours, but this does not matter because EVs bad and we must find a way to prove it)

Even so, EVs (once properly warmed up) use very little power to stay warm, the whole point is moot.
I think an EV would probably last 48 hrs or so, in which time I would be able to get some help by then I suppose? It's not like there's very remote areas here where they can't get to?
 
Yeah the SOON(tm) is a common argument.

Yes, my 2.0 TDI will idle and produce heat for probably days on end if i’ve got a full tank. So will an EV with a charged battery. If you leave in a blizzard without enough fuel or electricity, you’re an idiot.
 
With an EV, if survival is the goal, the only thing you need to heat is a seat warmer to keep your core warm which you can do without running anything else. Every so often you can run the cabin heater if you need/want, or a steering wheel heater to warm up your hands...I wonder how long an EV could run just its seat warmers? Have there been any stress tests on that?
 
With an EV, if survival is the goal, the only thing you need to heat is a seat warmer to keep your core warm which you can do without running anything else. Every so often you can run the cabin heater if you need/want, or a steering wheel heater to warm up your hands...I wonder how long an EV could run just its seat warmers? Have there been any stress tests on that?

Looks like our definitions of winter are a bit different. :LOL:
 
I wonder how long an EV could run just its seat warmers?
If the seat warmer uses 100 W, that’s probably pretty generous… add to that another generous 300 W for just keeping the car „on“ (yes, it’s a lot, but that is still a reasonable assumption) and with a 60 kWh battery you’ll get 150 hours.
 
I think an aftermarket 12 volt seat heater pad is around 50-60 watts. I would say a cabin heater needs maybe 1.5kW if it's really cold. 0,5-1kW if it's around 0 C.

Five seconds on Google tells me a 2.0 TDI uses 0,7 liters per hour to idle. That's 100 hours on a full 70 liter tank then. ~50 hours on a normalish EV battery when using a kW?

So I guess the new SI defined unit of time called SOON™️ is 50 hours then.
 
Looks like our definitions of winter are a bit different. :LOL:
I grew up in Wisconsin, with the occasional -30F to -40F windchill, sometimes colder. :) I'm just talking about the minimums for survival as a thought experiment.
 
Five seconds on Google tells me a 2.0 TDI uses 0,7 liters per hour to idle. That's 100 hours on a full 70 liter tank then. ~50 hours on a normalish EV battery when using a kW?
But if it is far below 0°C, especially with a bit of cold wind, I'm not sure just idling will keep your engine warm enough to keep you car at a decent temperature.
 
But if it is far below 0°C, especially with a bit of cold wind, I'm not sure just idling will keep your engine warm enough to keep you car at a decent temperature.

Webasto heaters are a thing. I'm going to be warm and toasty for as long as I've got diesel.
 
A couple/few years ago, there was a bad snow storm on the East coast that left people stranded for days and the ICE vehicles needed to be refueled. The EVs were all fine.
 
A couple/few years ago, there was a bad snow storm on the East coast that left people stranded for days and the ICE vehicles needed to be refueled. The EVs were all fine.

I'm sure there are people that go out with 10% battery, just like there are people that conk out on the freeway because "apparently this car didn't have a low fuel light"
 
I'm sure there are people that go out with 10% battery, just like there are people that conk out on the freeway because "apparently this car didn't have a low fuel light"


So the idiots set the standard? As noted above, only a fool sets out in a storm without filling up the tank or batteries.
 
The TL;DR: Carry a spare for your trailer.

The long story is, had to go pickup 10000 pounds/4500 kg of guardrail posts today about 260 miles from home. Yesterday I got the truck and trailer ready. Oil change on the truck, had the tire fixed that was leaking, topped off all the tires, torqued the trailer lugs, the hole bit, but I didn't have time to get a spare for the trailer.

I made to the pickup point no problem, but dude that we bought the posts from pointed out a problem with one of the tires. Not much I could do, so I just went for it. Just an hour from home I feel the truck shake and look back to a cloud of smoke from the right side of the trailer. We lost a tire. Yes, tire dude pointed out. Luckily we were only a 1/4 mile from an exit for a town. Unluckily it was 5:30 and I knew all the tire shops would be closed up. But again, luckily, the auto center at Walmart was open until 7.

I pull into the first parking lot where I can dolly down the trailer, remove the wheel with what remains of the tire and we are off to Walmart. I was prepared and brought an electric impact and a ramp to put the trailer on, so that went quick.

At Walmart they had the oddball 235/80-16 trailer tire I needed, I picked up a 12 ton bottle jack (just in case) and at 7 pm we were out the door of Walmart back to the trailer. Install went well, did need the bottle jack, but managed to forget it when I took the trailer off the ramp, so hopefully it survived. Back on the road at 7:30 with a quick stop to wash up and donut holes. Back home at 8:30.

I did order a spare to carry from now on... all the other trailers have a spare, just not this one.

BTW, towing a big heavy trailer loaded only cost a single MPG going from 9.3 MPG/25.29 liters per 100 km to 8.3 MPG/29.40 liters per 100 km.
 
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