Random thoughts.... [Tech Edition]

Household of one:
One desktop PC
Two smartphones (one from work so it sits around 99.9% of the time unused)
One bicycle computer (only very briefly daily to upload rides and download routes and updates)

That's it...

I really don't get connected appliances (washer, dryer, fridge etc.) in general - why would you want that? What's the use case? So that the washer can send you a notification "hey, your washing cycle is done"? Just set a timer on one of your smartphones, it's not rocket science, and the too often abysmal IT security of IoT devices doesn't matter. You should be able to program current devices to start x hours after you load them anyway so just do that if you want that.
 
Nice game :p Let's go then!

Household of 3 (not sure a 2yo counts, but whatever):
  • 3 Desktop PCs
  • 2 Laptops
  • 2 Tablets
  • 2 Smartphones
  • 1 bike computer
  • 1 Kindle
  • "Smart" Stuff
    • 2 additional Wifi APs, one "smart" switch
    • 3 Bridges (Hue, Homematic, AhoyDTU for balcony PV)
      • 25 Zigbee things (thereabouts, I change remote sockets around a bunch)
      • 25 Homematic IP things
    • 2 robot vacuums
    • 1 car
    • 1 RPi for Home Assistant
    • 1 Main PV&battery inverter
    • 1 car charger
    • 1 driveway camera
    • 6 Sonos Speakers (although that build its own wifi network from the main wired unit...)
    • 1 Dishwasher and 1 oven (the only thing I use from time to time is the remote start on the oven - I did not actively decide to buy the smarts in this case, they were just included in the models I wanted)
    • not yet taken out of the box: 1 NSPanel (see Adu's post on that one somewhere around here) and 1 dotmatrix ESP32 based thing (which I don't quite know what to do with yet)
So that the washer can send you a notification "hey, your washing cycle is done"?
in case of a washer and dryer that one is actually not a bad use case, as such... since both devices, if they're smart enough to be connected, probably also adjust their running cycle depending on load and (in the latter case) amount of water/humidity, resulting variable running times.
our washer isn't even all that new and still will wildly vary running time on the same setting by +-15 min. usually we don't give a crap and go the timer router (if that, brain is enough, mostly) aiming for the max runtime sorta, because whether the stuff is in there an additional half hour doesn't matter all that much. same with the dryer, really - although ideally the stuff is actually dry when that's done, so less of an issue...
 
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I forgot about the Google Cast speakers (Denon soundbar, 2 Blaupunkts and a JBL one), and I didn't even bother listing the rest of the networking equipment (Mikrotik router (for now), 3 APs, one managed switch and several unmanaged ones)
I really don't get connected appliances (washer, dryer, fridge etc.) in general - why would you want that? What's the use case? So that the washer can send you a notification "hey, your washing cycle is done"? Just set a timer on one of your smartphones, it's not rocket science, and the too often abysmal IT security of IoT devices doesn't matter. You should be able to program current devices to start x hours after you load them anyway so just do that if you want that.
I like it for the power use monitoring the washer and dryer allow, plus indeed the ability to show the devices' status (currently, each has an icon on the NSPanel when in operation) and the ability to notify when they're done. For the fridge, eh, it, eh, allows me to monitor the temperatures and has a sensor that tells me whether the fridge door is open. No idea what to do with that though. We bought the fridge and only after delivery found out the smart stuff. In case of washer and dryer, it's very hard to buy a decent one that doesn't allow internet connectivity.
3 Bridges (Hue, Homematic, AhoyDTU for balcony PV)
I used to also have a branded zigbee bridge (IKEA in my case), but ditched that in favour of my own Zigbee2mqtt setup so I could use whatever Zigbee device I want instead of only what that specific flavour of bridge allows. And with Hue especially since they now force you to use a Phlips acocunt in order to use Zigbee stuff, which should not require any internet connectivity whatsoever
1 RPi for Home Assistant
I hope you have your offsite backup setup for when your SD card breaks from constant writes :p.
 
yeah there's more stuff like the car and the car charger but they don't really count as they hardly use wifi really... Same goes for daft stuff like our new oven ... yeah it's nice you can preheat it remotely and get a notification when your food is done, but does this really improve my life that greatly? I doubt it.

Coincidentally the list was made a few weeks ago since my old wifi modem/router got frigged, and I needed to explain to the wife/kids why it needed some tinkering. Because I can set the network name/password back to the old one (which requires 1 input via a website) or I could manually reprogram every device with the new network name/password, which involves diving into the settings of 24 seperate devices.

Because of this, I think I'll be using my current network name and password until I die.

Also, this has become a fun game, let's see who can "win" this game with most pointlessly large number of devices
 
I feel like I am on the other end of the spectrum
3 people:
3 cell phones
1 desktop
2 laptops (but one is used only at work)
Nintendo Switch
PlayStation 5
Chromecast
TV

*caveman noises*
 
I hope you have your offsite backup setup for when your SD card breaks from constant writes :p.
Running off an SSD… but still, regular backup does run.

Re hue: I’m lazy. Also now that it can speak matter, it is happy to forward my old osram plugs to homekit without further fiddling. Which is enough for me. I know HA would happily do that, but see above, I’m lazy 😐
 
Okay... this will be interesting :p One person household:

"Consumer devices":
  • 1 desktop ("gaming")
  • 2 laptops (both work, employer + customer/project machine)
  • 1 tablet
  • 1 Kindle
  • 3 smartphones (work/private + 2 customer/project test devices)
  • 1 smartwatch
  • 1 VR goggles
  • 1 TV
  • 1 printer (_just_ smart enough to work over WiFi, but old/dumb enough to not have toner DRM yet)
"Smart stuff" in WiFi/wired Ethernet:
  • 4 Raspberry Pis:
    • HomeAssistant / "server" (RPi 4 / 8GB)
    • MagicMirror (RPi 4 / 2GB)
    • Octoprint / 3D printer (RPi Zero 2 W)
    • DIY wordclock (RPi Zero W)
  • 4 ESP8266 / ESP32s running ESPHome:
    • kitchen motion / env sensor
    • 2x plant moisture/conductivity BLE sensor relays
    • DIY CW/WW monitor light bar
  • 1 Tasmota-flashed power strip (powering the TV and speakers)
  • 2 Tasmota-flashed power plugs (measuring consumption for the fridge and the washing machine)
  • 1 Fritz! wifi repeater / range extender (to get better network on the far side of the apartment, and down to the parking spot below)
  • 1 car
  • 1 pair of TP-Link powerline adapters (to get network to the cellar, where the washing machine is)
  • 1 washing machine
  • 1 Ikea / Sonos speaker
  • 1 HomePod Mini
Other smart stuff:
  • 49 Zigbee devices in total
    • Light bulbs and fixtures
    • Power plugs
    • Temperature / humidity / air quality sensors
    • Door and window opening sensors
    • Motion sensors
    • Wall switches / button panels
    • Heating radiator thermostat valves
  • 4 Fritz! DECT devices
    • 2 radiator thermostats that haven't been upgraded to Zigbee yet
    • 2 window blinds rollers
  • 6 BLE plant moisture/conductivity/light sensors
There's probably a couple more things I forgot to list, too. I have too much stuff.
 
2 people:

1 laptop + 2nd monitor (for work only)
1 desktop with 2 monitors
1 android tablet
1 iPad (for work only)
2 android phones (not counting the old phones in a box in a closet)
2 TV's, one Vizio where we just used the built-in apps, and an older Samsung with an Amazon Fire Stick.
Raspberry Pi retropie "console"
1 b&w Brother laser printer
Then there's our lightswitches, aaand...that's it.

We don't use any real "smart" features of the lights, except manual control on the app (I have a home screen widget called "I'm home" where one press turns on the outside lights, and the light in the room just inside the front door), and a sunset-sunrise program for the light on our address numbers, which we have to have on some sort of control (like a built-in light sensor) per code anyway

The only thing we could see adding would be:
1) a garage door opener. We don't currently have one at all, so it would likely be a "smart" one, so we didn't have to have any exterior-accessible controls, and no need for openers in the car (we park outside).

2) a way to control out solar-powered skylights (the operable windows on our roof) when we're not home. They only work with their remote controls, and it would be nice to be able to close them if we're going to be out late (so the roof raccoons don't fall through the screen into our home).

Our thermostat is "dumb" because there's no pattern to our activities, so there are zero actions it could take automatically that wouldn't be annoying regularly.
 
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Give me ethernet or give me death! Wired for the win!

Wireless is just for very minor stuff.

3x Smartphones
1x iPad
1x Personal laptop (old Lenovo Helix I don't use)
1x Rpi Zero W E-ink display (it gets powered on at 5am every morning, downloads an image from the web and updates the display, then shuts down)

Otherwise wired stuff:

3x Desktops
2x TV STBs
2x TVs
1x Work laptop (used with Dell dock)
1x Printer
1x Energenie hub (local RF smart switch hub)
1x CCTV DVR
1x RPi 4 (basically just used for viewing/capturing webcams, last used for an osprey webcam but currently offline)
1x Xbox 360 (I still use it for Forza 4)
 
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Okay, chiming in. Only counting devices that are actually in use, at least from time to time. Household of 2.

Wireless:

3x smartphones (one of which is my old phone, nowadays almost exclusively used as an alarm clock)
1x iPad (currently not connected to WiFi, actually)
1x iPod touch (I found it for cheap on a flea market, showed it to my brother who decided he likes it and kept it)
2x laptops (well, technically three, but one of them is my brother's old laptop which is gonna get listed soon)
1x desktop PC (mine, it's still that old Dell Precision that has Ethernet port issues)

Wired:

1x server/NAS/Frankenstein's monster that's currently being used as a NAS
1x desktop PC (my brother's Lenovo ThinkCentre Ubuntu machine)

That seems like not a lot of devices, but then, that's not counting all the phones I've been fixing or need to fix, that I had connected to the network just to test out. Or the old MacBook Pro 17 from 2011 I have lying around. (Which is still functional, including the GPU!)
 
Give me ethernet or give me death! Wired for the win!
As you probably know, the correct quote is "Give me convenience or give me death"... Which actually means wifi is King.
I only have my TV router thingy connected via wires, because it HAS to, everything else (absolutely everything) is on wifi and I wouldn't want it any other way.

I've never noticed any slowdown, not even with both kids using the PS4 and Switch, the wife working remotely from home and myself having data heavy online meetings with hundreds of participants, so I see no point in going wired (even aside from the faff that comes with it)

So my question is : why do you overcomplicate things for yourself?
 
So my question is : why do you overcomplicate things for yourself?
Overcomplicate? There's nothing simpler than getting a device out of the box and bunging a cable into it. You plug it in and it works. No security complications, no interference, band switching or range issues. In my case the cables are all in the places where the stuff is and there is more than one device in each place to warrant having a wire run to that area, the most inconvenience was getting a gigabit switch with more ports for my desk. Where they don't reach or the device needs to be portable, well those are the devices on wireless.

Now my server has SSDs in it I've even considered getting a switch with a couple of 2.5Gbit ports, my newest machine has 2.5Gbit on the motherboard and an equivalent card for the server is cheap. I don't particularly need all that speed though, as nice as it would be when it comes to backup time.

It could change, this motherboard came with a large external antenna that probably gets a great signal. I might find out one day, the wired network has so far been so reliable I haven't needed to. I fully expect my cable internet to become 5G/6G at some point, but I'll keep the internal wired network for as long as I can. I deal with too many shitty wireless issues at work, where people just have awful home internet setups.

I'm certainly not trying to sell it, it doesn't make sense if you don't need it, but the next time my ISP sends me a new router I only have to update a few devices and the rest just continue to work like magic. The TV STBs were crap sharing recordings between themselves over wireless, but that could be because they're shonky Tivo boxes.
 
So my question is : why do you overcomplicate things for yourself?
Because some devices have hot garbage wifi and it’s not actually complicated (in my particular case, I will admit).
4 of my wired devices live directly next to my router. There are 8 Ethernet ports wired throughout the house (many may argue way too little) that all go to a central basement room. Plus: Mesh wifi does suffer without a wired backhaul, so I’m happy to make use of that option.*
Other wired stuff: rpi, inverter (both in the same basement room with the main switch), Sonos and Apple TV (both 1m from Ethernet and the Sonos experience / latency actually improves a lot from that, don’t ask me why). Also wife’s pc doesn’t have wifi (because lazy/not needed, again 2m from the port).
… to be fair I actually chose to have the ports exactly where they are when we renovated the place and we knew (broadly) what was going to go where.

* to expand on that: yes I could buy an AP where this is less of an issue for double the money. The cable is cheaper 🤷‍♂️
 
Family of 6, but children between 4 and 10, so they don't have or need there own smartphones or computers yet):
1x desktop
2x laptop
1x chromebook (wife's work)
2x Android tablet (1x work)
1x windows tablet (work)
3x Smartphone (1x work)
1x smart tv
1x Android tv box for the dumb tv in the bedroom
1x dishwasher (I couldn't care, but my wife wanted to connect it to the wifi just because it can)
1x Xbox (although I guess it's a wired connection, can't remember)
1x Nintendo Switch
1x network printer/scanner

And I guess 3x mesh clients, but they are our wifi network so I don't really count them as connected to our wifi network.

I can live with that list for our situation.
 
Give me ethernet or give me death! Wired for the win!
When we renovated our house I made sure to add ethernet wall plugs to every room and it's proven to be useful in many cases. At first for connecting stuff with bad or no wifi receivers and most recently for installing a wifi mesh kit. I could simply plug them in in every room to test how I got the best coverage in and around the entire house. Using a wired connection for that also means they can all operate at full speed instead of sharing bandwidth.

I connected those network ports through a managed switch, which means I have pretty much full control over what and when every/any device can access on the internet. It doesn't work for mobile phones off course, but all the other devices connected to the internet can be limited or disconnected in an instant. That does prove to be helpful from time to time with kids 😂 .
 
Holy shit is Roku's product line confusing.

All of these are just streaming devices that you control with an included remote, plug into a TV's HDMI port (either directly or with a cable), and are currently available at Walmart:
  • Roku Express
  • Roku Express HD
  • Roku Express (2022)
  • Roku Express 4K
  • Roku Express 4K+
  • Roku Streaming Stick 4K
  • Roku Ultra
  • Roku Ultra LT
  • Roku Ultra LT (2019)
  • Roku Premier in a silver box for $19
  • Roku Premier in a purple box for $32
  • Roku LE
And that doesn't include apparently some "Black Friday Exclusive" variants which have less ram and/or a stepped-down remote.
 
How can there be so many variants of a product that is arguably defunct when every modern TV has all the apps built in?

I still have a Roku XS from my days of using Plex, it was always a bit rubbish. The last time I used it was to connect to an old CRT, thats when I found out that the device sold in the UK apparently doesn’t support PAL.
 
How can there be so many variants of a product that is arguably defunct when every modern TV has all the apps built in?
Same could be true for e.g. an AppleTV - which is at the same time also rather expensive! And I still own one!
Because a) I have a 10yo LG TV with garbage smarts and probably compromised security and 2. the stupid fire tv I ditched for it was an ad-infested hellscape that felt like it was running a 66MHz 486 CPU.
 
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