Random Thoughts (Top gear Edition)

LP

Your Brown Banana for Scale
DONOR
Joined
Apr 24, 2006
Messages
7,953
Location
East-Timor, USA
Car(s)
206 HP N/A washing machine
The rip is usually up within an hour or so?
I'll refer you to what I said:
I don't mind waiting for the good quality and very high quality versions after the episode has aired, I have a world of patience when it comes to that. I just wanted to feel like I was watching it live for once.
I don't mind waiting, I just wanted to feel like I was watching it live for once.

Greasemonkey for Firefox used to work for me...dunno why it stopped. Every now and then, it'll let me watch on the BBC site. But not too much anymore. Might be cause I downloaded the latest version of Firefox and changed something...but maybe give it a try?

And Streetfire.net usually has the episodes up pretty quick.
greasemonkey eh? Narf provided me with a link to watch but it's kinda slow. Greasemonkey might be faster I assume.
 
Last edited:

narf

Sgt. Maj. Buzzkill
DONOR
Joined
Feb 1, 2008
Messages
18,175
Location
Kiel/Wherever, Germany
Car(s)
'19 BMW M240i
Narf provided me with a link to watch but it's kinda slow. Greasemonkey might be faster I assume.
There should not be a GM way of doing this because you would have to change the way the flash works, not just fiddle around with the DOM tree. The only way is to get a ticket request through from a British IP.
 

Sock

Member
Joined
Jun 12, 2010
Messages
93
Again, I really want Jeremy to work with Michael Bay. Make it a tv ad challenge or something. The presenters would work with directors to advertise something. Top Gear always done great when matching the guys up.
 

GreenBullet

Active Member
Joined
Feb 23, 2010
Messages
308
Location
Non-Ukania
Car(s)
Subaru WRX
I was wondering if anyone had a copy of Jeremy's current Sun column? Apparently, he comes to Rupert Murdoch's defence re: the phone hacking scandal...
I've been curious if Clarkson would bring up the subject in his column since Murdoch owns the Times.

From todays' Guardian:
Despite having his private life frequently splashed across the Mirror newspaper, Topgear presenter Jeremy Clarkson today comes to the defence of the tabloid press, writes Lisa O'Carroll:

Jeremy Clarkson warns "we may well end up with a press that can't expose a thing" if reform of newspaper regulation is left to MPs.

In his column in the Sun, he says: "Of course I 'don't like being photographed looking fat. Of course I don't want my private life splashed all over the Mirror" but that allowing politicians "a bunch of people who are still smarting from the way journalists exposed their expenses fraud" to drive the debate will be a mistake he says.

He describes himself as one of Rebekah Brooks' 'closest friends' and laments the loss of the News of the World but says it would be worse if Rupert Murdoch sold his remaining titles, the Sun, The Sunday Times and the Times.

"I urge you all to remember that while Rupert Murdoch is being presented right now as the devil and even if you believe that, he is at least the devil you know.
 

shellygrrl

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 29, 2008
Messages
3,678
Location
Maine
Jeremy's entire page in the Sun is devoted to the phone hacking scandal. (Usually, there's a main column and some little snippets about other things.)
 

GreenBullet

Active Member
Joined
Feb 23, 2010
Messages
308
Location
Non-Ukania
Car(s)
Subaru WRX
And it should be good:
He may call me a 'hideous toad' but I must, through gritted teeth, admit that Jeremy Clarkson's column in The Sun today is excellent. by @piersmorgan.
One billion thanks to anyone with the scan.
:p
 

Hive

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 21, 2011
Messages
983
Location
Hong Kong
Car(s)
MTR
thanks Whitevanwoman!

Can someone tell me what this means: "...worked on a red top..." ?
 
Last edited:

narf

Sgt. Maj. Buzzkill
DONOR
Joined
Feb 1, 2008
Messages
18,175
Location
Kiel/Wherever, Germany
Car(s)
'19 BMW M240i
Wikipedia said:
Red top
This section includes a list of references, related reading or external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks inline citations. Please improve this article by introducing more precise citations where appropriate. (March 2011)
Look up red top in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

Collectively called the "tabloid press", tabloid newspapers in Britain tend to be simply and sensationally written, and to give more prominence than broadsheets to celebrities, sports, crime stories and even hoaxes; they also more readily take a political position (either left-wing or right-wing) on news stories, ridiculing politicians, demanding resignations and predicting election results. The term "red tops" [1] refers to tabloids with red nameplates, such as The Sun, the Daily Star, the Daily Mirror and the Daily Sport,[2] and distinguishes them from the Daily Express and Daily Mail. Red top newspapers are usually simpler in writing style, dominated by pictures, and directed at the more sensational end of the market.

A recent British survey alleged "journalists on newspapers such as The Sun, Mirror or Daily Star" to be considerably less trustworthy than both politicians and estate agents, with fewer than 10% of people trusting them to reliably report the truth.

In the United Kingdom, "red tops" are newspapers that have a red masthead, and which share an emphasis on entertainment news, celebrities, sports and political scandals. The red tops are all printed in the tabloid format, and include The Sun, the Daily Mirror and the Daily Star, along with various local and regional newspapers.

The term distinguishes the traditional, sensationalist tabloids from former broadsheet newspapers, such as middle-market newspapers the Daily Mail and Daily Express, and more recent converts The Times and The Independent, who in recent years have switched to the tabloid or compact format, whilst maintaining their emphasis on political and financial news and commentary.
^ that.
 

Mr. Nice

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 6, 2007
Messages
2,422
I have serious doubts that Woodward and Bernstein would have hacked a cell phone, had that been a possibility. That's really an offensive thought. US newspapers tend to have higher standards than UK tabloids. Our tabloids contain very little, if any, real information. There are exceptions, but they're papers like the New York Post (coincidentally, a Murdoch owned paper).

Quote from Wiki:

Murdoch imported the sensationalist "tabloid journalism" style of many of his Australian and British newspapers, such as The Sun (the highest selling daily newspaper in the UK). This style was typified by Post's famous headlines such as ?Headless body in topless bar? (shown on the right). In its 35th-anniversary edition, New York Magazine listed this as one of the greatest headlines ever. It also has five other Post headlines in its "Greatest Tabloid Headlines" list.[25]
It really disgusts me that any newspaper like that is kept in business in this country, as it is downright unAmerican to mix tabloid trash with real news. That's not to say that it never happened before in this country, we did have William Randolph Hearst and Yellow Journalism

Another Quote from Wiki:

Hearst was a leading Democrat who promoted William Jennings Bryan for president in 1896 and 1900. He later ran for mayor and governor and even sought the presidential nomination, but lost much of his personal prestige when outrage exploded in 1901 after columnist Ambrose Bierce and editor Arthur Brisbane published separate columns months apart that suggested the assassination of William McKinley. When McKinley was shot on September 6, 1901, critics accused Hearst's Yellow Journalism of driving Leon Czolgosz to the deed. Hearst did not know of Bierce's column, and claimed to have pulled Brisbane's after it ran in a first edition, but the incident would haunt him for the rest of his life, and all but destroyed his presidential ambitions.[25]

Pulitzer, haunted by his "yellow sins,"[26] returned the World to its crusading roots as the new century dawned. By the time of his death in 1911, the World was a widely respected publication, and would remain a leading progressive paper until its demise in 1931. Its name lived on in the Scripps-Howard New York World-Telegram, and then later the New York World-Telegram and Sun in 1950, and finally was last used by the New York World-Journal-Tribune from September 1966 to May 1967. At that point, only one broadsheet newspaper was left in New York City.
That's basically, from a historical standpoint, why that type of journalism leaves a bad taste in the mouths of Americans. While I don't know for certain that Woodward and Bernstein would not have engaged in illegal activities to get information on Nixon, I utterly and sincerely doubt it.

Mr. Clarkson, please, provide us with some substance to back up such an inflammatory allegation. :puke:
 
Last edited:
Top