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narf

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Mz non-graphing Casio probably lasted around thirteen years, got it in 7th ish, and it survived through 13th and 5 years of university... died a while ago, no replacement.
 

IceBone

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I should also say that we weren't allowed graphing calculators, cause that was considering cheating. Not to mention we couldn't afford one.
 

calvinhobbes

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I've had mine since 9th grade, 1998, standard non-graphing of course. And it died recently... new batteries didn't help.
 

the Interceptor

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I've had my non-graphical Ti30 since 5th grade or so, that was 1988. It still works fine to this day, I'm not even sure if I ever had to change the batteries.
 

eizbaer

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still have my 1998 ti30 as well, but haven't used it since 2005. since then i've been using some casio, because screw school regulations on what calculator to use! :p
 

SpitfireMK461

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I got a Ti-83 in 8th grade, so 2002, and it last into college, probably 2008. I think it got damaged somehow. Then I bought a Ti-84 to replace it and it still works good as new.
 

Heathrow

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BBC TV -The Science Of Doctor Who

BBC TV said:
For one night only, Professor Brian Cox explores the universe of the world?s favourite Timelord, Doctor Who.


Brian takes an audience, with the help of celebrity guests, on a journey into the wonderful universe of The Doctor, in a specially recorded programme from the lecture theatre of the Royal Institution of Great Britain.

Brian reveals the science behind the spectacle and explains the physics that allows Doctor Who to travel through space and time. Fun, but filled with real science, it?s a special night for Who fans as well anyone with a thirst for understanding.

Brian is in the unique position of knowing The Doctor?s universe inside out as well as the reality behind the drama. When the TARDIS travels through time and space, Brian understands the physics involved. And when it comes to life on other planets, Brian knows the real science that could prove extra-terrestrial life might just really exist in our galaxy.
Thursday 14 November 9.00-10.00pm BBC TWO

The Prof. is always watchable and interesting, hope it's not too Geeky! :lol:

(Also posted in the Entertainment Thread.)
 

chaos386

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Is The Universe A Hologram? Physicists Say It's Possible

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/12/11/universe-hologram-physicists_n_4428359.html?ncid=txtlnkusaolp00000592

The headline intrigued me. Perhaps someone can translate it into English for me....because I really can't see how they are getting this hologram stuff :blink:
Not hologram as in "fake", hologram as in "3D information in something that's actually 2D" (but with 10D and 9D instead of 3D and 2D). This is based on a pair of papers where a ten-dimensional string theory model (9 space + 1 time) produced the same final result for some physical properties of a black hole as a nine-dimensional one that ignores gravity.
 

chaos386

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Time is a spatial dimenion, damn it! >_<
I'm not a theoretical physicist, so I was just basing it off this Nature article (emphasis mine):

Nature said:
In 1997, theoretical physicist Juan Maldacena proposed1 that an audacious model of the Universe in which gravity arises from infinitesimally thin, vibrating strings could be reinterpreted in terms of well-established physics. The mathematically intricate world of strings, which exist in nine dimensions of space plus one of time, would be merely a hologram: the real action would play out in a simpler, flatter cosmos where there is no gravity.
 

IceBone

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Yes, but that's 16 years old already. Just ask LP, in the world of science, 1 month can mean something is out of date already.
 

chaos386

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Yes, but that's 16 years old already. Just ask LP, in the world of science, 1 month can mean something is out of date already.
The papers related to it were published much more recently (the article I'm linking to is two days old), and I watched the video you linked. I'm finding it very suspect, since the man is not a scientist and I couldn't find if his project has any scientific advisors.
 

IceBone

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Well, I feel like an idiot now. I never researched much on this guy, stuff he says just kinda made sense to me, but yeah, doesn't seem like he has any scientific backing to his "interpretations".
 

Firecat

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This is a video that I watched ages ago, found it interesting. So what are the reasons for measuring such an experiment that would cause a wave function to collapse.

 

MadCat360

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This is a video that I watched ages ago, found it interesting. So what are the reasons for measuring such an experiment that would cause a wave function to collapse.
Any time you reduce a probability to a (more or less) definitive point you collapse the probability wave. By reducing the probability of a photon entering either slit from 50/50 to 100% certainty on either side, you remove a large portion of uncertainty from the experiment (that being the distance and subsequent propagation from the laser to the slits).

A really cool (and much more advanced) version of the double slit experiment is called the delayed choice quantum eraser which not only shows that the universe conducts physical interactions with both "imaginary" and "real" interactions, but it also is not time dependent.
 
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