The Aviation Thread [Contains Lots of Awesome Pictures]

mpicco

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Still so far away from electric airplanes, battery power density has to grow in magnitudes before we see electric airliners. Baby steps I guess.
 

bone

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Well they better come up with alternatives then. Should we walk the 500 miles? And then 500 more? Just to be the one who walked 1000 miles to save some CO2?
they do have reasons, a while ago on the news they interviewed a couple, and they said to only travel inside europe because they don't like spending more than 2 hours on a plane...

i wanted to hit them in the face
 

GRtak

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This was inevitable. I am even a bit surprised it took this long.

This whole episode has shown that there is a need to overhaul the process of certifying new airplanes and modifications to existing airframes, or systems. The FAA has failed in it's job to oversee such things, and Boeing has failed to listen to those within the company that point out potential problems. The former is a case of laziness, although the FAA would argue it is streamlining for efficiency. The later is pure hubris. Sadly, there doesn't seem to be any recognition of this within Boeing.
 

calvinhobbes

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This was inevitable. I am even a bit surprised it took this long.
Yup. I still think they might end up scrapping the entire MAX programme.

As for hubris, that’s a very good description. When Boeing didn’t take the A320neo series seriously and their beancounters decided that another warmed-over 737 was all they needed to stay competitive, they created a flawed aircraft that hopefully won’t kill even more people.

Concerning the FAA, its current state is what we get from the “small government” types. IIRC, the FAA even railroaded its European counterpart EASA into adopting the initial certification of the MAX, to the tune of “you either shut up and accept our verdict or we’ll end reciprocal certification”.
 
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CrzRsn

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their beancounters decided that another warmed-over 737 was all they needed to stay competitive
My understanding was that it wasn't just internal bean counters, but that American Airlines bullied them into developing the plane when they announced an order for an as-of-then unannounced and unplanned variant of the 737.

 

calvinhobbes

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My understanding was that it wasn't just internal bean counters, but that American Airlines bullied them into developing the plane when they announced an order for an as-of-then unannounced and unplanned variant of the 737.

I’ll have a look at the video when I have decent WiFi again, but it’s true that at least one airline did put pressure on Boeing to deliver a new 737 variant that didn’t require a new type rating different from that for the 737NG. Namely, Southwest Airlines.
 

CrzRsn

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I’ll have a look at the video when I have decent WiFi again, but it’s true that at least one airline did put pressure on Boeing to deliver a new 737 variant that didn’t require a new type rating different from that for the 737NG. Namely, Southwest Airlines.
In typical Wendover fashion, its an excellent aviation industry video. He didn't mention Southwest, but the pilot type rating was mentioned regarding AA.
 
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