The Aviation Thread [Contains Lots of Awesome Pictures]

They are not going to win the protest, the Bell design far exceeds the Sikorsky-Boeing entry is every metric. Even when the Sikorsky design is close to the Bell, it still is falling short. The range and speed measures alone put Bell in the lead.

The Defiant (Sikorsky) has a sling load of 5,300 lb, the Valor (Bell) is 10,000 lb. Sikorsky trumpeted the 60 degree banked turn, but that doesn't tell you the wing loading or the rate of turn, the angle alone means nothing. The Bell would do 45 degree turns at 200 knots. The Sikorsky can get close to 250 mph, but that's still more than 60 mph off the 300 mph top speed of the Bell. There are also reports of technical problems with the Sikorsky design, specifically the counter-rotating assembly and rotors. Sikorsky claims their solution is "lower risk" than the Bell, but they had to redesign the system last minute because their bearing assemblies couldn't be scaled up from the demonstrator to lift the full weight of the prototype.

As interesting as contrarotating assemblies are, the Bell tiltrotor has better performance pretty much everywhere you look.
 
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"Standby to copy a number..." is not what you want to hear as a pilot.
 
The final Boeing 747 built is on its delivery flight and has made a special detour:


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I'd love to hear the ATC calls and see the flight planning process for that flight...
 

As I've been reading up on GA flying and aircraft, I keep hitting this block in my head - why the hell are so many GA piston engines practically antiques with hand-operated mixture controls, leaded fuel, and icing-prone carburetors? ICE engines have come so far, but for some reason the engines used in GA are stuck 70-80 years in the past.

This guy took an aluminum V8 automotive engine and installed it in a Cessna 172 - and it apparently flies great and doesn't need as much nannying from the pilot as aviation engines thanks to fuel injection and the multiple redundant systems he designed. In fact, it out performs the aviation engines.
 

As I've been reading up on GA flying and aircraft, I keep hitting this block in my head - why the hell are so many GA piston engines practically antiques with hand-operated mixture controls, leaded fuel, and icing-prone carburetors? ICE engines have come so far, but for some reason the engines used in GA are stuck 70-80 years in the past.

This guy took an aluminum V8 automotive engine and installed it in a Cessna 172 - and it apparently flies great and doesn't need as much nannying from the pilot as aviation engines thanks to fuel injection and the multiple redundant systems he designed. In fact, it out performs the aviation engines.


Inertia. Why change things when it works like it was designed?

With that being said, things are changing, but slowly. Newer aircraft have newer engines that are fuel injected.

Also.

 
^ Awesome! - And it's almost baffling in todays Youtube when a impressive thumbnail is actually part of the video :D
 
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