The General Motorbikers Discussion Thread

Karoug

Techno Viking
Joined
Apr 5, 2006
Messages
6,466
Location
Sweden
Car(s)
Scooter power!!
^So you are saying that one of the best stuntriders in the world should do balance drills? :blink: If you look close you'll see that there's ice/frost on the road...
 

Derek

Is Über
Joined
Dec 7, 2004
Messages
2,495
Location
?ire
Car(s)
We're finally gonna need a car where we're going.
Nice video, but it's still too much off-roader for me. :p

If I'm quite honoust with you:
[youtube]http://youtube.com/watch?v=M4ftw_WJZcA[/youtube]
This is a CB500 (unlimited I'm guessing but still) helluvafast already! :p

I don't want to be overdoing it.
 

Blind_Io

"Be The Match" Registered
DONOR
Joined
Apr 5, 2006
Messages
21,638
Location
Utah, USA
Car(s)
06 Nissan XTerra Off Road, 00 VFR800, 07 ST1300
^So you are saying that one of the best stuntriders in the world should do balance drills? :blink: If you look close you'll see that there's ice/frost on the road...
I didn't notice the frost when he was making that left past the camera, he just looked a little shaky about the same time his wheels passed the bottom of the frame.

I retract my statement - I now think he's crazy for riding in the snow/frost.
 

BlaRo

Little Nudger
Joined
Aug 18, 2005
Messages
18,181
Location
New England
Car(s)
Moto Guzzi V7 Special, Fiat 500 1957 Edition
Chopper:

Tiny pic but it illustrates my point nicely. Choppers are modified bikes with basically anything extraneous cut off. Typically hardtails. That bike pictured is pretty much my dream bike :mrgreen:.

Was it that bad? I've been looking at '70s Yamaha and Honda 500s-750s to replace my enduro, but I need something that can manage at least state highway speeds and possibly stick to a corner respectably. Mostly I'm looking at the CB and XS bikes; the Suzukis of that era seem a little porkier. Any tips?
Technically, that's a bobber because the rear fender is cut short, or "bobbed", and it's on a stock frame, with most other features (such as the forks and tank) as stock. Bobbers with their shortened fenders and solo seats were relatively simple modifications to old bikes such as Triumphs, that could be taken dirt-track racing just as easily. Anything that wasn't directly related to turning, going, or stopping was hacked off (or "chopped" according to the early definition of the term).

Choppers, however, took this further by "chopping" and welding stock frames into grotesque hardtail configurations, and especially by introducing longer forks and larger rakes as early bike customizers in the 50s realized that longer front ends allowed for further straight-line stability, perfect for cruising the boulevards and desert highways of postwar America. Tall "ape hangers" are also more commonly seen as choppers for more comfortable highway riding. Style took a precedence over racing performance, much like lowriders vs. hot rods. Today's choppers are noticeably different than the above bike with their huge front forks, gleaming chrome, and extreme riding angle. I personally love bobbers like the one above due to their simplicity and lack of flashiness.

The terms have been interchanged over the years, so I'm just being needlessly pedantic. :D

And if you're a real man, you build your own chopper or bobber. :p

Oh, and my bike still isn't done yet.
 

Blind_Io

"Be The Match" Registered
DONOR
Joined
Apr 5, 2006
Messages
21,638
Location
Utah, USA
Car(s)
06 Nissan XTerra Off Road, 00 VFR800, 07 ST1300
EDIT: I think I would like a combination of these two. The above bike's seat, rear fender and tank on this bike's chassis, tires and springer front end.

Yes, an old bobber:




and the bobber's grandkid, the streetfighter:


The best known chopper of them all, Captain America:
 
Last edited:

Labcoatguy

Forum Addict
Joined
Mar 27, 2005
Messages
13,774
Location
Boston, MA, USA
Car(s)
#Jaguar #XKR, #Saab #9-3, #Toyota #MR2 #2ZZ
Just the kind of thing to hop on and beat up some sissy-ass mods on a stuffy night by the seaside!

EDIT:Woo, 1200 posts!
 

Luca

is meh.
Joined
Dec 12, 2006
Messages
630
Location
Vienna, ?sterreich
^ the rider seemed a bit wobbly on some of those slower turns. He should stop riding on stairs and work on balance drills.
This is a clip cut from Ghost Rider 5, if it is the same rider it could be explained by the fact that he usually rides superbikes.
 

Blind_Io

"Be The Match" Registered
DONOR
Joined
Apr 5, 2006
Messages
21,638
Location
Utah, USA
Car(s)
06 Nissan XTerra Off Road, 00 VFR800, 07 ST1300
That might explain it, a Supermotard has a very different suspension set-up from a sportbike.
 

Karoug

Techno Viking
Joined
Apr 5, 2006
Messages
6,466
Location
Sweden
Car(s)
Scooter power!!
I didn't notice the frost when he was making that left past the camera, he just looked a little shaky about the same time his wheels passed the bottom of the frame.

I retract my statement - I now think he's crazy for riding in the snow/frost.
Well he wouldn't be the worlds most infamous rider if he had any sanity.. :p
This is the same guy
[YOUTUBE]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z2V8vCnkJu0&feature=related[/YOUTUBE]
 

Blind_Io

"Be The Match" Registered
DONOR
Joined
Apr 5, 2006
Messages
21,638
Location
Utah, USA
Car(s)
06 Nissan XTerra Off Road, 00 VFR800, 07 ST1300
From what the guys on BARF were saying, he was told he had an inoperable tumor or something so he started doing this because he didn't care if he died on the bike or not - which he eventually did.
 

hansvonaxion

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 8, 2005
Messages
2,839
Location
Tokyo
Car(s)
Legacy GT-B
I think the Bandit is the bike you might wanna keep when you are allowed to take the 25kw limiter off.. it's a good allround bike.

And the KTM isn't an offroader, it's a supermotard.
But it's impossible to go for a "nice" ride on one of those.. :cool:
[/YOUTUBE]
I was thinking the same thing, if you think you'll want to keep it and de-restrict it the bandit might be the way to go. But really, any bike will be fun. :) Honda CB's are great, much prefer the looks of the older ones though.

Supermotards are actually great city bikes. The riding position is more upright and higher (more comfortable and better visibility), they're manouverable and the big single means great responsiveness, they're also usually geared for acceleration. Just not everyone's cup of tea.

And yes, the Ghostrider is certifiable! :? I was impressed at his all-round ability in the last movie, high speed, stunts, jumps etc.
 

tigger

Forum Addict
Joined
Dec 11, 2006
Messages
5,737
Car(s)
'88 Vic Wagon, '92 Honda VFR
On another, yet not any less important note, clothing. Do we have any tips about that?
Like Blind said, good steel-toe boots are critical. It always makes me laugh when I see some idiot on a liter bike with sandals on; that's a good way to lose a toe. Or a foot. I've got a pair of Wolverine brand boots that I've found to be very robust and plenty comfy for walking around all day in. I've also got an excellent pair of dirtbike gloves. That's probably the only decent safety equipment I have though. My leather jacket is tough, but it's probably bigger than it should be (got it second hand, so meh.) And I just wear a lid and goggles, but I think that Blind and some of these other guys have sold me on a full face number.

BlaRo said:
Technically, that's a bobber because the rear fender is cut short, or "bobbed", and it's on a stock frame, with most other features (such as the forks and tank) as stock. Bobbers with their shortened fenders and solo seats were relatively simple modifications to old bikes such as Triumphs, that could be taken dirt-track racing just as easily. Anything that wasn't directly related to turning, going, or stopping was hacked off (or "chopped" according to the early definition of the term).
When I think bobber, I think springer front end, pre-unit Triumph or Knuckle/Flathead engine, soft-tail, 40s-50s inspired etc etc. The bike I posted, I'd just consider a simple Honda chopper.

BlaRo said:
Today's choppers are noticeably different than the above bike with their huge front forks, gleaming chrome, and extreme riding angle. I personally love bobbers like the one above due to their simplicity and lack of flashiness.
I tend to call those simply 'customs'. Adding a hundred pounds of chrome and giving a bike suspension geometry that makes it unrideable doesn't make it a chopper to me.

BlaRo said:
The terms have been interchanged over the years, so I'm just being needlessly pedantic. :D
Nothing wrong with that. Who doesn't love a good argument over semantics? :lol: Maybe my definitions are based on more 'old school' conceptions, thats what I get for listening to a bunch of old farts when it comes to bikes.
 

Anthony

Member
Joined
Jan 25, 2006
Messages
66
Location
Sydney Australia
Textile gear is fine, however it does not do as well in a crash. If you do go down plan on replacing all your gear. Leathers will do better and may not need replacing in all but the worst crashes.

Gear is good, rashing is bad. Really bad road rash may result in bad scarring and skin grafts. Denim is not abrasion resistant!

Armor. Rash is bad, but impacts are what break bones and shatter joints. Be sure to get full armor including knees, shoulders, elbows, back, and if you are going to be really aggressive you should get armored hip pads and specialized motorcycle track boots. Now, I don't ride with hip pads or track boots and much of the time I don't wear knee armor. My bike is also my workhorse commuter so I need to be presentable during the day. Also, armored gloves are a must. All armor is not created equal, just because it says "CE" doesn't make it the best. I like the armor with a hard plastic shell lined with padding, I think it does a better job spreading out the force of going down than the dual-density armor. I have had both and I feel much better with hard armor.

Pants: I have a pair of Draggin' Jeans with kevlar in the knees and ass. I have never gone down in them and I hope I never do. The kevlar helps with abrasion resistance but it's not as good as leather. My problem is that I can't find leather pants that fit, and most the time I don't want to sit in class wearing leather gear. The Draggin' Jeans are better than the Icon in my opinion because of the kevlar in the ass. Icon and other brands just have it in the knees, but in a crash you will probably end up on your ass most of the slide. For longer rides I wear leather chaps to cut the wind and provide added protection against stones and other road debris that can be kicked up. If you get the Draggin Jeans, I suggest you get hard-shell knee armor to wear under them. I don't recommend the armor that hooks inside the pants, as it would move too much in a crash. Get some armor from your local shop that straps to your leg.

Helmet: Full-face helmet. Period. More impacts happen on the face guard of a helmet than on any other part of the shell. Without a face guard even a minor crash will result in months of expensive reconstructive surgery and eating liquefied Salisbury steak. Full face helmet, all the time.

Boots: if you don't get track-style boots go with something heavy with a hard sole. I ride in OSHA steel-toe work boots but I have some Red Wing riding boots on order. My steel toes have saved me twice, once when I went down and my bike landed on my foot, another time (just two weeks ago) a piece of metal debris blew into my path and I hit it with my foot at 60 mph. My boots have a dent in the front of the sole and a slice in the leather, but my foot was fine.

Jackets: A regular leather jacket is not adequate. I thought it was until I crashed at 30 mph in one and the pavement rashed right through it. You need a good leather jacket with the fit and leather specifically made to protect you in a crash.

Last thoughts
Be sure to budget for gear with your bike. While it's important to be comfortable when you ride, remember the gear is designed to fit tightly. This prevents it from moving around during a crash and it will keep you safer. Don't be fooled by motorcycle-brand street clothing, it's not riding gear. If you want it, wear it when you're not on your bike.

Although I am a relatively inexperienced rider, in the short time I have been riding I have seen one fatal crash, one crash that was near fatal and one where the person lost around 30% of movement in his wrist. The latter 2 were my best mates, the former an acquaintence.

Full faced FTW...when my best mate came off a couple of months ago, he slid for aroudn 2-3 metres on his face. I'd hate to think what would have happened if he wasn't wearing a full facer. He was also wearing a normal leather jacket...big fucking no-no. The jacket didnt tear, but the road rash was till pretty bad.

I havent bought a bike as of yet, am looking at a CBR 250RR...usually just bludge my mates GPX when I get the itch...I do ride my mates R1 on occasion. That's better than sex. With restrictions though the quickest thing I can get would be a 250rr or a ZX2R...not really worth the money though. And the debate continues haha.
 

Karoug

Techno Viking
Joined
Apr 5, 2006
Messages
6,466
Location
Sweden
Car(s)
Scooter power!!
From what the guys on BARF were saying, he was told he had an inoperable tumor or something so he started doing this because he didn't care if he died on the bike or not - which he eventually did.
They are confusing him with that guy that did his train thing.. :p
Ghostrider is very much alive... The only thing he suffers from is a lack of brain..
 

KaJuN

Disco Inferno
Joined
Jul 31, 2006
Messages
9,745
Location
Dayton, Ohio
Car(s)
Mini Cooper S, Landy Series III, Vulcan 900 Custom
Yay Derek is joining the motorcycle brigade! :banana: Whatever bike you end up choosing I'd recommend staying away from anything with 4 carburetors. That's what mine has and they're a real pain in the ass to get working properly. They're still not adjusted right and I'll probably end up biting the bullet and taking it into a shop.
 

hansvonaxion

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 8, 2005
Messages
2,839
Location
Tokyo
Car(s)
Legacy GT-B
Yay Derek is joining the motorcycle brigade! :banana: Whatever bike you end up choosing I'd recommend staying away from anything with 4 carburetors. That's what mine has and they're a real pain in the ass to get working properly. They're still not adjusted right and I'll probably end up biting the bullet and taking it into a shop.
Apparently, you need some jam jars, some flexible plastic tubing and a screwdriver. ;)
 

KaJuN

Disco Inferno
Joined
Jul 31, 2006
Messages
9,745
Location
Dayton, Ohio
Car(s)
Mini Cooper S, Landy Series III, Vulcan 900 Custom
If we weren't talking about troublesome carburetors that would freak me out. :lol: But I'm intrigued. Can I use those MacGuyver-esque supplies to sort things out?
 

BerserkerCatSplat

Hormone Induced
Joined
Jun 21, 2005
Messages
9,512
Location
Alberta, Canada
Car(s)
The Jeep of Theseus, Angry Wagon
From what the guys on BARF were saying, he was told he had an inoperable tumor or something so he started doing this because he didn't care if he died on the bike or not - which he eventually did.
You must be thinking of a different guy, Ghostrider was anything but dead last time I checked. :p
 
Top