The "i made dis" thread

NecroJoe

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Heah, I'mI'm using the metal z-bar "Hang man" hangers. Each one is listed as 155lbs, and I'm using two of them, and each one will hit two studs, and whereever it doesn't hit a stud, I'll also use a Hilti toggler.. I'd say best estimate so far, thiswill weigh less than 100lbs.

I'm thinking I might try to make one tall block removeable (magnetic?), and driving a screw straight into the wall as a sort of "seismic anti-dislodgement pin", so that in the case of a significant "hop", there will be something beyond just gravity holding it tothe french cleat-style bracket.
 

NecroJoe

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A french cleat running the length of that thing to hang it will be more than enough to safely hang it. Not only will it be easy to hang using one, but you get to secure the cleat on the wall across every stud it spans, so the support is more than adequate.

See also these videos from John Heisz which immediately popped into my mind seeing your build. He made a very similar thing but even heavier.


John Heiss is a YouTube treasure. Did you see his recent sandpaper/table saw video?
 

Nabster

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A magnetically attached block hiding a security screw would be a fine method. I'd be tempted to just drill a deep hole from the top next to the wall down through both halves of the cleats and put a long pin or nail down the hole to just hold things together. at that point you'd have to have a seismic event strong enough to knock it straight upward a distance longer than the pin for it to come apart.

John Heiss is a YouTube treasure. Did you see his recent sandpaper/table saw video?
John's a character. He does whatever the hell he wants and doesn't particularly care what other people think. Most of his videos are quite entertaining, but sometimes his stubbornness in doing things in a way the drags it out and over complicates it annoys me- for example the never ending "I'm going to make the ultimate best ever table saw using plywood and old salvaged parts" series. Seriously, Marius Hornberger bought a table saw that has more functionality than whatever John's 'ultimate table saw" will ever be capable of :-D
 

NecroJoe

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About 2 years ago, we startd an art project. After seeing something like this at client's offices, we thought it would something we could make for our living room. Especially once I started seeing how expensive something like this was selling for on Etsy (close to $3k for ones the size we wanted), and especially especially when I found some pre-milled ash 2" x 2" x 30" boards on clearance at a local lumber supplier.

It got inturrupted by a home remodel where we added a master suite to the bck of the house, but we made some progress on this wall art piece a weekend or two ago. i finished cutting all of he perimeter pieces with the appropriate notches, adding the mounting hardware to the back, and started staining using up whatever stains we had sitting around in the garage, some of them almost 20 years old.

Still a little more finish work to do, then adding the pieces around the perimeter to hide the shallow false back. It'll appear about 3" deep ad it's thickest, but only the perimeter is hte full depth. The rest of about 5/8" shallower, so that I had some solid plywood to screw the mounts into, a flat surface to glue everything to, and to reduce weight.

So far nothing's glued down yet, so there won't be any gaps/alignment issues. If i remember right, the total piece will be 30" x 55", and will hang above our sofa in the living room.

in the bottom photo, you can see the plywood sticking out on all sides. i've got pieces with notches cut into their backside so that they wrap around that ledge, making the whole thing look like one huge end grain butcher block. The plywood will also help prevent cracking as everything further dries/expands/contracts with the seasons.



Some progress. After stumbling/struggling with glue last weekend, I got the edge pieces attached. Hoping the glue is strong enough to handle it to hang it above the sofa tomorrow. That will mark the end of project we started January, 2018

 
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