TSA now conducting random vehicle inspections on highway / The TSA Thread

CraigB

Ich bin ein Kartoffel
DONOR
Joined
Feb 14, 2007
Messages
13,409
Location
SWMO
Car(s)
Mustang SVO - Nissan Frontier Pro-4X & Altima
If I wanted to skip the search I would not be let on the ferry for 24 hours.
 

93Flareside

Döner Kebab enthusiast
DONOR
Joined
Jul 20, 2009
Messages
17,804
Location
42 miles outside of Chicago
Car(s)
‘18 VW Golf GTI, '87 Mercury Colony Park
On my regular travels on i294, i290 and i65 interstates, I've seen white F150's sporting US Customs and Boarder control speeding past me.
 

Blind_Io

"Be The Match" Registered
DONOR
Joined
Apr 5, 2006
Messages
22,422
Location
Utah, USA
Car(s)
06 XTerra, '00 VFR800, '07 ST1300, '11 Multistrada
No, they don't. TSA is not law enforcement, no matter what they think. They cannot detain you, they cannot arrest you, they cannot file criminal charges against you. They can call a real police officer to do all of the above.

Also, you don't have the right to refuse contact at an "administrative checkpoint", including those at airports. You are not being detained as part of a criminal investigation, but you cannot gain access to the secure area without passing through the check point. The same logic is used for the agricultural checkpoints along highways leading into California, DUI checkpoints, and Border Patrol internal checkpoints. The courts have ruled that these checkpoints are a violation of the 4th Amendment, but that these violations are permissible because they are of little inconvenience (U.S. vs Davis, 1973; United States v Marinez-Fuente, 1976; Michigan Dept. of State Police v. Sitz, 1990).
 

LeVeL

Forum Addict
Joined
Jun 16, 2007
Messages
13,265
Also, you don't have the right to refuse contact at an "administrative checkpoint", including those at airports. You are not being detained as part of a criminal investigation, but you cannot gain access to the secure area without passing through the check point.
I would argue that a ferry does not qualify as a "secure area". This is especially the case since Craig was staying within the US so it wasn't a border crossing.


The same logic is used for the agricultural checkpoints along highways leading into California, DUI checkpoints, and Border Patrol internal checkpoints. The courts have ruled that these checkpoints are a violation of the 4th Amendment, but that these violations are permissible because they are of little inconvenience (U.S. vs Davis, 1973; United States v Marinez-Fuente, 1976; Michigan Dept. of State Police v. Sitz, 1990).
You can absolutely refuse to answer any questions at a DUI checkpoint. Without reasonable suspicion that you've been drinking, they have to let you be on your way.
 

GRtak

Forum Addict
Joined
Sep 6, 2008
Messages
20,341
Location
Michigan USA
Polaneczky: Innocent frequent flier detained after run-in with TSA


APPARENTLY, working as a supervisor for the Transportation Security Administration at Philadelphia International Airport comes with a perk: You get to throw people in jail for no good reason and still keep your job.

If that's not the case, why is Charles Kieser still employed by the TSA?

Roger Vanderklok had the misfortune of going through Kieser's security-screening area at 8 a.m. Jan. 26, 2013, in Terminal B.

Vanderklok, 57, is a Philly architect who runs half-marathons. Twice a month, he flies around the country for weekend races.


On this day, he was headed to Miami. In his carry-on bag was a packet of PowerBars and a heart-monitoring watch. When the bag went through the X-ray scanner, the items looked suspicious to a TSA agent whom Kieser supervises.

For the next 30 minutes, screeners checked the bag several times. Vanderklok told them that a tube-shaped case in the bag contained his watch. Then he was asked if his bag contained "organic matter." Vanderklok said no, as he thought "organic matter" meant fruits or vegetables.

PowerBars, which contain milk, grain and sugar, are considered "organic matter" and can resemble a common explosive. Terrorists often use a small electronic device, like a watch, to detonate the explosive. Hence the agent's concern.

Once the items were deemed harmless, Vanderklok says, he told Kieser that if someone had only told him what "organic matter" meant, he could have saved everyone a lot of trouble. Kieser then became confrontational. Vanderklok says he calmly asked to file a complaint. He then waited while someone was supposedly retrieving the proper form.

Instead, Kieser summoned the Philadelphia Police. Vanderklok was taken to an airport holding cell, and his personal belongings - including his phone - were confiscated while police "investigated" him.

Vanderklok was detained for three hours in the holding cell, missing his plane. Then he was handcuffed, taken to the 18th District at 55th and Pine and placed in another cell.

He says that no one - neither the police officers at the airport nor the detectives at the 18th - told him why he was there. He didn't find out until he was arraigned at 2 a.m. that he was being charged with "threatening the placement of a bomb" and making "terroristic threats."

Vanderklok's Kafkaesque odyssey finally ended at 4 a.m., when his wife paid 10 percent of his $40,000 bail.

When I heard this story, my first thought was that Vanderklok had to have said or done something outrageous for others to respond with such alarm. In fact, Kieser said as much at Vanderklok's trial on April 8, 2013.

Under oath, Kieser told the court that he had been monitoring Vanderklok's interaction with the bag screener because "I saw a passenger becoming agitated. Hands were in the air. And it's something we deal with regularly. But I don't let it go on on my checkpoint."

Kieser intervened, he said, and that's when Vanderklok complained that the screening was "delaying him." While he said this, he "had both hands with fingers extended up toward the ceiling up in the air at the time and shaking them."

Vanderklok also "put his finger in my face. And he said, 'Let me tell you something. I'll bring a bomb through here any day I want.' And he said you'll never find it."

Vanderklok repeated the aggressive finger-pointing two more times, Kieser testified.

But here's the thing: Airport surveillance videos show nothing of the sort.

Throughout the search, Vanderklok appears calm. His laptop computer is tucked under his arms and his hands are clasped in front of him the entire time. Without any fuss, he follows TSA agents when they move from one part of the screening area to another. He even smiles a little.

Not once does he raise his hands. Not once does he point a finger in Kieser's face. If anyone is becoming agitated, the video shows, it is Kieser.

Neither Kieser nor his colleagues appear alarmed about the bomb threat Vanderklok has allegedly made. They chat and laugh with one another behind a desk, check their cellphones. One sips a soda, another wanders around the area, straightening bins. Two more assist an elderly couple with their wheelchairs.

They do not summon the FBI, clear passengers from the area, don protective gear or appear to do anything suggesting there's looming danger.

And here's another thing: Kieser alleged that Vanderklok told him, "I'll bring a bomb through here any day I want. And . . . you'll never find it." But that's not what Kieser told police, according to the report taken by the responding officer. The report reads that Vanderklok, frustrated, told Kieser, "Anybody could bring a bomb in here and nobody would know."

The first statement is a threat, forbidden by law. The second is an opinion, protected by it.

Vanderklok says he made neither statement. Yet he was treated like the Shoe Bomber.

Even talking about it now, two years later, rattles him.

"I was scared to death. I have never been arrested in my life, never had handcuffs put on," he says. "Throughout the night, I was in a dark place; no one knew where I was. I thought, 'I could fall off the face of the earth right now, and no one would know it.' "

While Vanderklok was worrying, so was his wife, Eleanor. When her husband travels, his routine is to call her when he boards the plane, when he lands and when he arrives at his hotel. This time, no calls. Nor did he respond to the increasingly panicked messages she left him.

She called his Miami hotel. He'd never checked in. She called the airline. He'd never boarded the plane. She called the city's hospitals. He wasn't in any of them. Finally, she called 9-1-1.

"I was so scared. I didn't know what to do with myself," says Eleanor Vanderklok. "A million scenarios go through your head."

She was waiting for an officer to arrive at the couple's Center City home to take her report when the phone rang. A police officer told her that her husband had been arrested and was awaiting arraignment. When she learned why, she was shocked.

"My husband has been on planes hundreds of times," she says. "Not once was there a problem. This was out of the blue."

At trial, Kieser was the first and only witness to testify. Municipal Judge Felice Stack acquitted Vanderklok of all charges within minutes of hearing Kieser's testimony. Vanderklok's lawyer, Thomas Malone, didn't get a chance to question the Philadelphia police officers and detectives who were involved in Vanderklok's arrest. Nor did he get to show the surveillance video that contradicted Kieser.

"The police at the airport never even questioned Mr. Vanderklok. They just detained him," says Malone. "The detectives at the 18th [District] also never spoke with him. He was charged based on a single allegation by one TSA employee."

Last week, Malone filed a suit on Vanderklok's behalf against the TSA, the Philadelphia Police Department and the Department of Homeland Security, alleging that Vanderklok was willfully deprived of his liberty because he had the gall to say that he wanted to file a complaint.

The city and the TSA declined to comment on the case. So allow me to.

Vanderklok's arrest reeks of payback from a TSA supervisor who - to give him the benefit of the doubt - was perhaps having a bad day on Jan. 26, 2013.

But that same supervisor's behavior on April 8, when he swore under oath to things that were not true, is not evidence of a bad day. It's evidence of someone who will stick to his story even if it means an innocent man may go to jail.

I don't know if that makes Kieser a bad man. But it sure doesn't make him a very good TSA employee.

It's unbelievable that he still has his job.
 

LeVeL

Forum Addict
Joined
Jun 16, 2007
Messages
13,265
That punk had a Glock 7. You know what that is? It's a porcelain gun made in Germany. It doesn't show up on airport X-ray machines and it costs more than what a TSA agent makes in a month!



TSA has yet to catch a single terrorist. Security theater at its finest.
 

tquattro

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 18, 2008
Messages
1,089
Location
Transylvania
Car(s)
Audi A3 1.8T
That punk had a Glock 7. You know what that is? It's a porcelain gun made in Germany. It doesn't show up on airport X-ray machines and it costs more than what a TSA agent makes in a month!
:lol: ...no rep button :(
 

LeVeL

Forum Addict
Joined
Jun 16, 2007
Messages
13,265
Four Passengers Removed From Spirit Airlines Flight Because of 'Suspicious Activity'

Law enforcement officers removed four passengers from a flight scheduled to leave Baltimore-Washington International Airport for Chicago O?Hare International Airport this morning, according to a statement from Spirit Airlines.

Spirit Airlines flight 969 was taxiing to the runway for its 6 a.m. ET departure when a passenger alerted a flight attendant to another passenger?s ?suspicious activity? on board the flight, the airline said.

The flight attendant notified the captain, who decided to return the plane to the gate.

A Maryland Transportation Authority (MTA) Police spokesperson told ABC News that law enforcement escorted three males and one female off the plane. They were then taken into custody at the airport.

All four of the passengers were "very cooperative," according to the MTA spokesperson, and charges are not expected to be filed. The spokesman said the "suspicious activity" involved one of the male passengers viewing a news report on his smartphone.

TSA Spokesman Mike England said TSA re-screened all carry-on and checked bags, and found no safety threats.

The incident remains under investigation by local authorities and the FBI.

According to FlightAware.com, Spirit Airlines flight 969 eventually departed the Maryland airport at 9:27 a.m. ET and landed in Chicago at 10:05 a.m. CT.
Reading the news is serious business. What a maniac!
 

Blind_Io

"Be The Match" Registered
DONOR
Joined
Apr 5, 2006
Messages
22,422
Location
Utah, USA
Car(s)
06 XTerra, '00 VFR800, '07 ST1300, '11 Multistrada
It's been a while since TSA really properly embarrassed themselves.

http://www.rawstory.com/2016/07/dis...g-confused-and-afraid-at-security-checkpoint/

This time they decided to beat a partially deaf, partially blind, paralyzed teen with a brain tumor after preventing her parent and caretaker from helping her.



A disabled woman was beaten bloody by federal agents during an airport security screening while on her way to undergo treatment for a brain tumor.

Hannah Cohen set off the metal detector at a security checkpoint at the Memphis International Airport, and she was led away for additional screening, reported WREG-TV.

?They wanted to do further scanning, (but) she was reluctant ? she didn?t understand what they were about to do,? said her mother, Shirley Cohen.

Cohen said she tried to tell agents with the Transportation Security Administration that her 19-year-old daughter is partially deaf, blind in one eye, paralyzed and easily confused ? but she said police kept her away from the security agents.

The confused and terrified young woman tried to run away, her mother said, and agents violently took her to the ground.

?She?s trying to get away from them, but in the next instant, one of them had her down on the ground and hit her head on the floor,? Cohen said. ?There was blood everywhere.?

The young woman, who was returning home after finishing treatment for the brain tumor at St. Jude Hospital, was arrested and booked into jail.

Authorities eventually threw out the charges against Hannah Cohen, but her family has filed a lawsuit against Memphis police, airport police and the TSA.

Neither police department commented on the suit, but a spokesperson for the TSA said passengers should notify agents ahead of time if they have special needs.

?Passengers can call ahead of time to learn more about the screening process for their particular needs or medical situation,? said TSA spokesperson Sari Koshetz.
 

CraigB

Ich bin ein Kartoffel
DONOR
Joined
Feb 14, 2007
Messages
13,409
Location
SWMO
Car(s)
Mustang SVO - Nissan Frontier Pro-4X & Altima
Has anyone ever equated TSA agents to mall cops with too much power?
 
Top