Flooring It: bad for the car?

LeVeL

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cold car - don't floor it
warm car - WOT is perfectly fine

/thread
 

_HighVoltage_

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How many miles does it have on it? It is a general tip to avoid full throttle starts in the first 5,000 miles.

But anyways - it's not a very good thing to floor a car. It is physics after all - you cause more stress on all the components and therefore shorten their lives. (That's not to say that your car will die after 2 years, but some components might need more frequent replacement)
 

Lupul

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Flooring it is bad because it is a forced action. If you are however a bit rev'd, push it down vividly and keep it floored that is ok as the car will encounter less stress. When i say it is bad i mean it will generate wear'n'tear faster than normal but it is not such a big concern when modern engines are involved.

Flooring it once in a while isn't good for the engine itself as it is good however for auxiliaries, helps with muffler clog issues, injector tip cleansing and so on.

As your car is a pretty recent version yet more than a year old it's probably gone well out of the "wear in" stages so it will tolerate most revs quite nicely but you have to take into account that kicking the pedal all the way to the road when doing about 1500 revs is not something it will eat up easily.
 

AarheadC

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A couple of you commented about it being good for the car and that it cleans out the carbon.
As this may have been true with older cars, this isn't the case now that cars are fuel-injected.

The carbon build-up, AFAIK, was due to the rich fuel mixture that carburated engines received.
 

tigger

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cold car - don't floor it
warm car - WOT is perfectly fine

/thread
Exactly. Your vehicle was designed to handle it's engines output. I'm not saying you should smash out everywhere you go, but it should be just fine every once in a while.

The carbon build-up, AFAIK, was due to the rich fuel mixture that carburated engines received.
Rotaries still require an 'Italian tune-up' every so often to blow the carbon out. *Insert rotary failure joke here*.
 

LeVeL

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A couple of you commented about it being good for the car and that it cleans out the carbon.
As this may have been true with older cars, this isn't the case now that cars are fuel-injected.

The carbon build-up, AFAIK, was due to the rich fuel mixture that carburated engines received.
WOT does clean out your injectors.
Also, if you want to be really picky, suddently mashing the throttle is not good. You should roll into it gradually, as opposed to going to the floor as fast as your foot can.
 

Spectre

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Rotaries still require an 'Italian tune-up' every so often to blow the carbon out. *Insert rotary failure joke here*.
Correct, if you don't blow the carbon out on a regular basis the engine may fail and your "replace engine now" light may come on.

If you DO blow the carbon out on a regular basis, the engine may fail and your "replace engine now" light may come on anyway. :lol::mrgreen:
 

idk

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It's not bad for the engine... But it's bad for the whole drive train when it has to handle an abrupt force... I try to get a photo of a worn hardy disc... I don't know how to describe it... Well if you intentionally want to break something you will bend it around abruptly. Or let's say jump on a board will break it... But step gently on it won't break it even when 3 people stand on it. It's the same thing.

In designing the mechanical components the engineers have to calculate and lay-up all dynamically stressed parts by certain criteria. In almost every material there is a certain endurance strength.

This factor in a material says how many stress cycles a material can take without breaking. This number of cycles decreases when the stress increases. Cars are designed to take much higher stress peaks once in a time then they are supposed to. But if that is done on a regular basis it will significantly reduce its life span. There is nothing to argue against that fact.

On a manual car you can see the gearstick moving around a little bit on alternation of load. When you put your hand on the leaver you also can feel it... You can also "feel" that it isn't that good for the components...
 
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Spectre

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It's not bad for the engine... But it's bad for the whole drive train when it has to handle an abrupt force... I try to get a photo of a worn hardy disc...
Yeah, but most RWD cars *don't* have a driveshaft damper, driveshaft rag joint, or "hardy disc". The only people I've seen use them on a regular basis is BMW and Mercedes. Jaguar didn't use them because those discs (while generally reliable) do have an alarming failure mode.
 

Eunos_Cosmo

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Correct, if you don't blow the carbon out on a regular basis the engine may fail and your "replace engine now" light may come on.

If you DO blow the carbon out on a regular basis, the engine may fail and your "replace engine now" light may come on anyway. :lol::mrgreen:
Are you referring to apex seals here? :lol:
 
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